Dental Tips Blog

Jan
7

How Mouth Breathing Affects Your Smile

Posted in Bad Breath

There is an unfortunate stigma attached to the habit of breathing through your mouth. But rather than being a gauge of intelligence and/or a sign of a social failure, mouth breathing is an indicator that something is interfering with the way your body normally breathes.

Mouth breathing can be caused by:

  • Nasal obstruction
  • Large tonsils
  • Inflammation
  • Common cold
  • Allergies
  • Sinus infection

Even the way the lips and/or tongue are attached to the mouth can cause mouth breathing. If these are positioned uncomfortably, it can be hard for the lips to stay closed together naturally, and if the mouth is open, air will pass through.

The Effects on the Mouth

Why is mouth breathing bad? The air is filtered differently when you breath constantly through your mouth. The byproduct tends to increase the acidity of your blood and saliva. This results in your teeth swimming in a more acidic environment, putting them at risk for cavities.

But the “swimming” may not happen much, at all.

Mouth breathing also tends to dry out the oral tissues. A dry environment will make your gums uncomfortable, while increasing your risk for tooth decay and gum disease. Dry mouth also leads to halitosis (stinky breath).

What to Do

There’s often not much you can do if your body is already anatomically predisposed to mouth breathing. But, your dentist can provide you with tooth-strengthening treatments to combat increased cavity risk. A minor surgery could even correct the position of your lips or tongue. It’s also a good idea to see your doctor about any chronic sinus issues or enlarged tonsils.

Schedule a visit to your dentist today for help controlling the effects of mouth breathing.

Posted on behalf of:
Red Oak Family Dentistry
5345 W University Dr #200
McKinney, TX 75071
(469) 209-4279

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