Dental Tips Blog

Sep
8

Will Dental Bonding Be Enough?

Posted in Bonding

When you chip a front tooth, you’re probably worried about getting it fixed as fast as possible!

Not many people care to be seen with a goofy little gap in their smile. If that describes you, then you will want to find the restorative solution that’s fast, beautiful, and durable.

Have you given any thought to dental bonding? Bonding is known for being fast and enhancing the look of a fractured tooth in a very natural way.

Sometimes, however, dental bonding just won’t quite cut it.

How Bonding Works

When your dentist bonds a chipped tooth, he or she applies a tooth-colored material to the gap, shapes it, cures it, and polishes it. The process is very fast, but the restoration is only a patch on an old quilt. Bonding is not meant to bear up under the heavy weight of a bite.

Although bonding will work on most front teeth, it’s also good for shallow repairs. If your tooth suffered damage close to the nerve chamber or bears a lot of weight during chewing, then bonding won’t be enough.

What Are Your Options?

If a front tooth is damaged enough, it needs a crown to stay together. A crown will seal off the entire tooth from threat of decay. Additionally, a crown provides the structural support that bonding does not.

A crown isn’t the answer for every case! If you have a chipped tooth but damage isn’t too deep, you might even go ahead and smooth out the entire tooth with a dental veneer.

Is bonding, a veneer, or a crown right for you? Contact your dentist today to find out!

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Aug
10

How Am I Supposed to Floss While Wearing Braces?

Posted in Bonding

“Floss, floss, floss” may be all you hear at every single dental appointment!

But how do you floss when the spaces between your teeth are blocked off with a wire?

It may take a little more effort, but with the right tools and a little determination, you can successfully floss your way to a healthier smile. Even while in braces! In fact, flossing is especially important while you’re in braces.

Floss Threaders

Floss threaders are slim, flexible, plastic, needle-like aids. They have a large eye, or loop, at one end through which you thread regular floss. Use the needle part to pull the regular floss in behind the wire. Now you should be able to use the floss as usual, gently moving it up and down against the side of each tooth.

Orthodontic Flosser

One company makes a unique disposable flosser. This plastic pick has an end that scoots right under the wire so you can move the flosser around to clean. This eliminates messy strings and threading!

Water Flosser

A device that uses water to clean is becoming more popular among those who wear braces as well as those who don’t. The flosser cuts out the need to buy floss often and get you hands tangled up in floss. It’s also fantastic for blasting sticky plaque away from around the brackets.

The best flossing device is the one you’ll use! If you’re wearing braces right now, go ahead and experiment with a variety of flossing aids. The one that you find easiest and most comfortable will encourage you to get your daily flossing in. Great hygiene while wearing braces will make sure your smile shines when they come off. At your next appointment, ask your dentist for more suggestions!

Posted on behalf of:
Springfield Lorton Dental Group
5419-C Backlick Rd
Springfield, VA 22151
(703) 256-8554

Jul
31

I’ve Chipped My Front Tooth! What Should I Do?

Posted in Bonding

Front tooth injuries are very common. This is especially true for very active people like kids and athletes. But accidents can happen to anyone! It’s embarrassing to have a chipped tooth. What are your options for restoring it?

How Bad Is It?

See your dentist right away. If the fracture is deep enough, it could have damaged the sensitive nerve chamber within your tooth. In this case, you would definitely need a crown and even a root canal to save what is left of the tooth.

Your dentist will take an x-ray of the tooth to assess how far the damage has gone. He or she will also help you manage any accompanying discomfort. Next, you’ll discuss restorative options.

Veneer

A dental veneer erases any shallow chips on the edge of a front tooth. Veneers are typically thin porcelain shells that fit over the entire front surface of the tooth. If the chip isn’t too big, a veneer can make your tooth look normal again. However, it doesn’t provide much structural support.

Crown

As mentioned earlier, a crown may be necessary in serious cases. A full crown will help give your tooth a uniform appearance and is the best choice for restoring strength to your bite.

Bonding

Dental bonding is the most common method of touching up a chipped tooth. First, the dentist applies a special filling material to the edge of the fracture to even it out. The material is light-cured and then polished. Bonding won’t give your tooth the strength that a crown will because it’s just a patch-up, but it’s quicker and less invasive than a veneer.

The next time you experience a chipped-tooth emergency, contact your dentist immediately!

Posted on behalf of:
Brentwood Dental Group
2440 S Brentwood Blvd
St. Louis, MO 63144
(314) 962-6643

 

Mar
6

Improving Your Smile: Dental Bonding vs. Veneers

Posted in Bonding

When you glance in the mirror, do you feel self-conscious about your smile? There are many options that can help to change that.  Two of the most popular are veneers and dental bonding, but which is the better choice for you?

Beautiful Porcelain Veneers

Veneers require more preparation of the tooth, but result in a dramatic smile transformation.  Veneers are very thin shells of porcelain covering the teeth, hiding your crooked, misshapen or stained enamel and even gaps between them.

Veneers are custom made to fit your smile.  The process begins with your dentist reshaping your concerned teeth to allow the veneers to be placed, without adding unwanted thickness.  Your veneers are then created in a dental lab, custom made to match the color and shape of your personal preference.  About two weeks later, they are bonded permanently to your teeth. Imagine, a perfect smile in just a few appointments!

Quick and Easy Dental Bonding

Like veneers, dental bonding masks imperfections in your smile.  Bonding uses the same composite resin used for tooth fillings. The resin material is color matched to your existing teeth and then applied by your dentist.  It can be molded and shaped, in office, and then bonded to the tooth with a special ultraviolet light that cures the resin.  This cosmetic therapy can fill gaps, hide cracked or misshapen teeth, brighten teeth or reshape them to be more pleasing. It is ideal for smaller, more localized concerns.

Which Option Is Right For Your Smile?

Dental bonding and veneers are both excellent options for creating an aesthetically pleasing smile, easily and quickly.  If you’re considering a smile makeover, call your dentist today and discuss which option is best for you!

Posted on behalf of:
Modern Family Dental Care
8505 Davis Lake Pkwy, Suite AB-3
Charlotte, NC 28269
(980) 248-2083

Jan
25

How Composite Bonding Can Make a Big Impact

Posted in Bonding

Bonding a tooth-colored material to your teeth to enhance your smile is a simple and fast way to correct your tooth’s appearance.  It’s an excellent way to compliment your smile makeover, or to address one or two problematic teeth.

Some common conditions for dental bonding include:

  • Closing gaps between front teeth
  • Creating evenly shaped teeth
  • An alternative restoration to metal fillings
  • Placed over roots for protection when gums have receded
  • Improve appearance for teeth that are discolored

What are the typical steps for a bonding procedure?

First, your dentist will carefully match the color of the bonding to your natural teeth. Unless the purpose for bonding is to restore a decayed tooth, dental numbing medicine is usually unnecessary. The tooth surface will be conditioned to open up the pores, so that the bonding material will adequately adhere to the tooth. Then, a tooth-colored putty is placed and formed to the desired tooth shape. Your dentist will use an ultraviolet light to harden the bonding permanently into place. Once cured, your dentist will trim and polish the bonding to the desired texture. The entire procedure usually takes 30 minutes to an hour to complete.

What are some benefits of dental bonding, besides restoring teeth and an attractive smile?

Dental bonding is less expensive than veneers.  It also has instant results as opposed to other restorations.  Also, bonding is reversible since very little (if any) tooth structure is removed during the procedure.

Do you have front teeth that need to be reshaped to improve your smile?  Are you considering dental bonding?  If you answered yes, call your dentist today!

Posted on behalf of:
Linda King, DDS MAGD
4146 Georgia 42
Locust Grove, GA 30248
(770) 898-8872

Sep
10

What Are Tooth Abfractions?

Posted in Bonding

Have you ever noticed a small, dark, wedge- or crescent-shaped notch carved into the base of one or more teeth?

That notch may, in fact, be an abfraction.

Abfractions look similar to the wear caused on teeth by aggressive tooth brushing but are caused by something else entirely. An abfraction is the result of a tooth flexing under excessive pressure over time. This pressure is often due to a tooth’s being out of proper alignment. When one or more teeth are even a little off-set, this opens them up to an unequal distribution of the bite force. Even teeth that are well-aligned can experience abfraction if regularly subjected to the excessive force of a grinding/clenching habit.

Abfractions typically only affect the enamel, which is the protective outer layer of the tooth. This means that abfractions generally do not cause discomfort. In severe cases, abfractions can extend into the deeper layers of the tooth and cause sensitivity. Although found more commonly on the back teeth, the lesion can also be found on the front teeth.

Abfractions jeopardize teeth by wearing away at their structure, undermining their strength. Teeth can break if the abfraction continues.

Unfortunately, there is no way to reverse an abfraction.

Abfractions are irreversible as natural tooth structure will not grow back. Some of the causative factors can be addressed by adjusting the bite, correcting tooth-alignment, and preventing excessive stress through use of a bite guard. Abfractions may worsen over time or not change, at all.

It is possible to reinforce an affected tooth with a simple filling. You might actually prefer to have one or more teeth filled to improve their appearance. Visit your dentist to learn more about how to enhance your smile by correcting abfractions.

Posted on behalf of:
Group Health Dental
230 W 41st St
New York, NY 10036
(212) 398-9690

May
29

Smoothing Uneven Tooth Edges

Posted in Bonding

Natural or not, uneven tooth edges can make your nearly perfect smile look like there’s something wrong. Thankfully, creating even edges on your teeth isn’t difficult at all. Tooth recontouring can be done using two different methods to create a smile that looks even from one side to the other. It’s ideal for teeth that look uneven, rough, or simply don’t fit in with the appearance of other teeth in your mouth.

Cosmetic Tooth Bonding

Using tooth colored cosmetic materials, your dentist can add shape and texture to the edges of teeth that are chipped, short, or broken. Composite bonding matches your tooth color, so the end results are essentially invisible. The process takes less than an hour to complete and provides you with long-lasting results that can be combined with other types of cosmetic treatments.

Tooth Recontouring

Adjusting the natural contour of your tooth can be done if there is excess enamel on one or a few teeth. Using a small instrument, the tooth is slightly adjusted to reduce its length. This can be done without any anesthesia at all. It’s a perfect choice for teeth that have bumpy edges or individual teeth that are slightly longer than the others. Recontouring is extremely safe and gives you permanent results in just a few minutes.

Tooth reshaping is one of the least invasive ways to enhance the overall appearance of your teeth. In just a few minutes you can experience dramatic results that change everything about the way you look. Ask your dentist if tooth recontouring is an option or can be used in conjunction with your other cosmetic dental treatments.

Posted on behalf of:
Toothmasters
139 Aliant Pkwy
Alexander City, AL 35010
(256) 329-8401

Dec
31

Tooth Recontouring and Bonding

Posted in Bonding

You have a healthy smile, healthy gums, but you still aren’t happy with how your teeth look. Maybe they’re uneven or have minor irregularities that make you feel self-conscious about their appearance. Thankfully, there’s something you can do to fix all of that without costly or time-consuming treatments that aren’t even in your budget. How? With minimally invasive, comfortable tooth recontouring and bonding.

Recontouring Reshapes Minor Irregularities

The recontouring process is used to smooth areas that are rough, uneven, or jagged. It can be used to help create a more uniform appearance from one side of your smile to the other; allowing teeth to look even and appropriately sized when compared side-by-side. Recontouring is often paired with other procedures like bonding or gingival recontouring for the best overall effect. However, it can also be used on just one or two teeth that may be of a concern.   

Bonding Fills in Broken, Chipped, or Gapped Areas

Tooth colored bonding is an excellent way to repair, rebuild, and reshape teeth with composite material. Composite bonding fuses directly to your tooth enamel, allowing the area of concern to be “rebuilt” so that the tooth appears whole once again. Bonding is an excellent choice for chipped teeth or to fill in spaces so that the tooth looks fuller. It can be combined with other types of treatments such as whitening, recontouring, crowns or veneers. 

Why wait another day when correcting your smile is something that can easily be done in just one visit? Talk to your dentist about scheduling a consult to find out how to have a smile that changes the way you feel every day.

Posted on behalf of:
Wayne G. Suway, DDS, MAGD
1820 The Exchange SE #600
Atlanta, GA 30339

Dec
29

Managing Exposed Root Surfaces

Posted in Bonding

Things like grinding, aggressive brushing, or even tobacco use can cause gum recession and root exposure. Here are a few things to keep in mind when talking to your dentist about managing your situation:

Addressing sensitivity

Exposed roots can create moderate to severe sensitivity problems, due to the nerve endings located in this part of the tooth. A desensitizing agent such as a fluoride varnish can be applied by your dentist for relief that will last up to 3 months. 

Bonding damaged enamel

Placing a composite restoration over the exposed root can restore aesthetics and prevent sensitivity. The material is matched to the shade of the tooth so that it looks as if your crown extends up to the gumline. Bonding is appropriate for mild to moderate recession. 

Preventing damage with a bite splint

Clenching and grinding of the teeth causes flexing of the tooth near the gumlines. Over time this leads to small amounts of enamel chipping away, exposing the roots. Gum recession is also a side effect. Your dentist can evaluate your bite and determine whether or not this is the cause of your condition. If it is, you’ll want to invest in a bite splint. Splints prevent excess wear from happening and also reduce muscle fatigue associated with TMJ disorders. 

Considering grafting

Severe root exposure can jeopardize the stability of the teeth. Gingival grafting can cover these areas again, providing security as well as protection for the exposed roots. An oral surgeon typically performs the grafting procedure. 

Adjusting oral hygiene methods

Over-zealous toothbrushing can cause gums to recede as well as abrasion of the enamel. That’s right – even a toothbrush can abrade enamel away! Always use a soft toothbrush with only a slight amount of pressure – never enough to cause the bristles to splay out.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Dec
5

Benefits of Tooth Recontouring and Bonding

Posted in Bonding

If you thought changing your smile meant you had to have braces, veneers, or crowns – think again. Tooth recontouring and bonding are both extremely simple procedures that can transform the way you smile and improve the way you feel about yourself.

Bonding uses tooth colored filling material to re-shape and re-form irregularly shaped areas of the teeth. These include chipped edges, narrow or short teeth, and even gaps between the teeth. Once the material is applied to the tooth and formed into place, it creates the appearance of a full tooth. It can also be used to cover exposed roots in areas of mild to moderate gum recession.

Recontouring is the gentle adjustment of the shapes and edges of the teeth. Perhaps you have healthy, straight teeth but the edges are uneven. When your dentist recontours the teeth, the edges are smoothed so that they are in line with the other teeth. Gum tissue can also be recontoured in a similar manner by adjusting the gumlines so that teeth are larger and the gumlines are even.

Minimal bonding and recontouring treatments produce dramatic results that can completely change the way you look. Many people opt to whiten their teeth prior to their treatment, so that the bonding can be matched to a whiter smile.

If you have generally healthy teeth but aren’t happy with their appearance, ask your dentist about recontouring and bonding. Just a short examination is all that is needed to determine if they are an option for you. The entire treatment can be completed in just one appointment! Ask your dentist for a customized care plan today.

Posted on behalf of :
Prime Dental Care
417 Wall St
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 651-8618

Most Popular

Tori, Exostosis, and Extra Bone Formation in the Mouth

A fairly common occurrence in the mouth is the existence of extra bone development along the outside or inside of the jawline near the teeth, or in the roof of…

Lingual Frenectomy versus Lingual Frenuloplasty

Lingual frenectomy and lingual frenuloplasty are both dental procedures used to correct a condition called ankyloglossia. Ankylogloassia, more commonly known as ‘tied tongue’, is an abnormality of the lingual frenulum….

Difference Between Conscious and Unconscious Sedation

Sedation dentistry is a wonderful option for many people who would not or cannot tolerate dentistry in a traditional dental setting.   Many people have a fear of visiting the dentist,…