Dental Tips Blog


Think Your Dental Crown is Too Big? What You Can Do

Posted in Crowns

Your dentist will always check the fit of a crown before cementing it in place. Take this opportunity to let him or her know whether you feel the cap looks too big.

You’d quickly notice whether a front tooth with a crown looks bigger than the rest.

But it can take a while for you to realize that a back tooth crown feels larger than it should. Once the anesthetic and sensitivity wear off, your crown may become more noticeable.

Why It Happens

Sometimes, it has to do with the way the crown was placed. If the cap isn’t properly positioned on the tooth, it can feel higher than the other teeth. You might sense that the capped tooth is the first one that you bite down on.

Alternatively, the crown itself may have a ridge or peak on the chewing surface that’s too high.

Why It’s Bad

You’ll be able to tell if something doesn’t fit right. In fact, your tongue may get tired from feeling it all day.

But it’s also bad news for your teeth. A poorly-fitted crown can wear down the opposing tooth it bites against. It can also stress the core and root of the tooth it’s covering. An uneven bite can tax your jaw, causing TMJ issues.

What to Do

Go see your dentist for an adjustment. If the crown is really off, then he or she may be able to reposition it.

The most common fix, however, is simply polishing down the high points on the crown. The dentist will use a special drill piece to remove areas that feel too big when you bite down.

Better yet, see a dentist who works closely with their lab and uses careful tools to assess the fit of your crown from the very get go!

Posted on behalf of:
Dental Care Center At Kennestone
129 Marble Mill Rd NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 424-4565


Why Do I Need a Crown if My Tooth Doesn’t Hurt?

Posted in Crowns

When a dentist recommends removing the outer layer of your tooth to make room for a costly crown, he or she has a good reason for doing so.

But your tooth isn’t bothering you, so why bother with a dental cap at all? 

Before it strikes a nerve

A tooth starts to hurt when the nerve deep inside is exposed to air or bacteria. Fracture and decay are the most common causes. It can take time for the damage to reach the nerve, however.

But therein lies the key: time.

These things don’t always happen overnight.

The damage can be well underway but you won’t realize it until it’s too late to save the tooth. By the time your it hurts, that could mean that the nerve is so damaged that you’re left with two options: extraction or root canal.

A dental crown is the way your dentist saves your tooth and protects the sensitive nerve within. This will buy you several more years to hold onto your natural tooth.

Need more proof?

Most dental offices are equipped with tools to detect problems and make them easier to avoid. Your dentist can use the following technology to show you where your situation lands in terms of seriousness:

  • X-rays
  • Photographs with an intraoral camera
  • Models and diagrams

Serious dental problems can take root long before you feel any symptoms. It’s scary news, but it’s the kind you can’t ignore.

Don’t let a fracture or abscess throw off your busy schedule and interfere with your life. Stay on top of your oral health by visiting your local dentist for regular dental checkups.

Posted on behalf of:
Soft Touch Dentistry
1214 Paragon Dr
O’Fallon, IL 62269
(618) 622-5050


What If You Don’t Have Time to Get a Dental Cap?

Posted in Crowns

One of the biggest reasons people put off dental treatment is because it can be inconvenient to a busy schedule.

Getting a dental crown, for example, can be a two-visit process. If there’s a holdup, then you may have to come in for a few additional appointments.

You just can’t afford to take that kind of time off from work.

Happily, more and more dental offices are turning to technology that cuts a huge chunk of time out of the crown-making process. This saves both you and your dentist a lot of time and money.

Dental Crowns in A Day

When technology makes advancements, dentistry is never far behind. Many dental practices now feature an on-site machine that manufactures dental crowns and other restorations right there in the office.

Additionally, these machines are often connected to computers with specialized design software. Instead of taking a messy impression of your tooth, the dentist simply scans it with an intraoral camera. The 3D image goes straight to the computer where your dentist can create the pattern.

The design goes right to the on-site milling machine which neatly carves the final restoration out of a solid piece of ceramic.

The best part? All of this can be done in just one visit.

Is A Single-Visit Crown Right For You?

These in-office one-appointment dental caps have been a lifesaver for many patients who are short on time. But keep in mind that this process has some limitations depending on what material or type of restoration is best for your tooth.

So, the next time you need a crown, ask your dentist whether this single-appointment crown technology is available near you.

Posted on behalf of:
Gold Hill Dentistry
2848 Pleasant Road #104
Fort Mill,  South Carolina 29708
(803) 566-8055


Will a Metal Crown Set Off an Airport Metal Detector?

Posted in Crowns

Getting through strict airport security can be a stressful event.

Everyone wants to make it calmly and quickly onto their plane. So if you accidentally set off a metal detector, you may feel a bit embarrassed, confused, and frustrated.

Dental restorations often include some sort of metal since many metals are strong, easy to shape, and accepted by our bodies.

One common dental concern people have when they get a new metal crown is: will my crown set off an airport metal detector?

What’s In a Metal Crown?

Metal crowns are often made from a mix of metals containing gold, which is not magnetic. In fact, most metals used in dental restorations are not magnetic.

Traditionally, metal detectors in airports scan for a magnetic response. So you’re more likely to set if off if you forget you’re wearing a metallic headband or belt buckle rather than because of having a dental crown!

However, most of today’s airports use body image scanners that are better at ignoring a small and non-threatening amount of metal, such as in a dental crown inside of your mouth.

Whether you have braces, a denture with metal clasps, fillings, an implant, or a metal crown, you should be perfectly fine going through airport security!

Why Switch to a White Dental Crown?

Metal crowns may be durable. But more patients are leaning towards getting tooth-colored restorations, anyway, for a couple reasons:

  • X-rays of all ceramic or porcelain crowns can show more of what’s going on around a tooth. Metal crowns aren’t see-through on x-rays so they can hide problems for a long time.
  • White crowns look better

Thinking of updating your metal crown? Talk with your local dentist to learn more.

Posted on behalf of:
Gilreath Dental Associates
200 White St NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 514-1224


Could Your Dental Crown Be Trying to Tell You Something?

Posted in Crowns

Dental crowns are meant to provide protection and structural support to weakened teeth. When it’s doing its job properly, a cap should be so comfortable that you don’t even know it’s there.

So if you notice any of these signs of premature wear on your crown, then it could be time to see your dentist about extending its mileage.

Your Crown Is Flattening

Is your crown looking a little less tooth-like these days? Dental crowns can wear down similarly to how teeth do if you have a habit of grinding your teeth. This shows up clearly on porcelain-covered metal crowns. Areas of heavy wear will show through as dark metal spots on the chewing surface.

Your Crown Shifts Around

A loose crown is a sign that the cement bond isn’t secure, if it was recently placed. Otherwise, it could mean that you have a cavity destroying the tooth beneath the cap.

The Crowned Tooth Is Getting More Sensitive

A little sensitivity is typical after getting a new crown. Your tooth needs time to adjust. But if your crown is only recently getting more sensitive, then that could mean there is a leak at the margin letting acids and bacteria sneak in.

Gums Around The Crowned Tooth Are Receding

Receded gums are fairly common with crowned teeth. But too much recession could indicate that your current cap is irritating the gum tissue. Sometimes, an open margin on the crown or excess cement underneath it could be to blame.

If your capped tooth is starting to feel a little strange, plan a visit to your dentist to get it looked at.

Posted on behalf of:
Buford Family Dental
4700 Nelson Grogdon Blvd. NE #210
Buford, GA 30518


What Happens When You Get a Dental Crown

Posted in Crowns

The famous gold teeth of dental lore are the forerunners to today’s sleek and comfortable dental caps. While dental crowns can still be made out of gold, most patients seek out restorations made from more life-like materials like porcelain.

But you’ve probably wondered more than once: how is a crown placed?

First of all, you visit your dentist to find out if a crown is even the best option for your tooth. He or she will help you decide on a material that best suits the needs of your smile.

Appointment #1

To get started, the tooth is numbed with anesthetic and reshaped so it will fit under a “cap.” Next, a series of impressions is taken to make a mold for the crown and to get an idea of how your teeth fit together when you bite. This ensures your restoration feels natural when you chew on it. Afterwards, your dentist will place a temporary crown to protect the exposed tooth.

The whole first appointment usually takes less than an hour. Within two weeks, the dental lab will have finished up your final crown and your dentist will call you in to have it placed.

Appointment #2

This appointment should be even shorter than the first. Your dentist will lift off the temporary crown, check the fit of the new one, and then cement it in place. Once it’s bonded, the fit will be checked and adjusted again.

You’ll leave with some instructions for special care in the early days of getting a crown. Make sure to ask your dentist for suggestions on making your crown last as long as possible.

Posted on behalf of:
River Ranch Dental
203 George Hopper Rd #100
Midlothian, TX 76065
(469) 672-4245


What A Dental Cap is and Why You Need One

Posted in Crowns

How useful is a hardhat, bike helmet, or football helmet if it has a crack in it? It’s basically pointless to wear a damaged piece of safety equipment.

Your tooth has a very similar setup. The outer layer of strong enamel is a covering that protects your tooth from the forces of biting and chewing.

Once that tough outer shell is compromised, however, you may need an entirely new “helmet.” This is wear a dental cap, or crown, comes into play.

Why Not Just Get A Filling?

A filling is often a great option for repairing tooth damage – if that damage is small enough. Fractures or cavities that compromise more than about 25% of the tooth’s structure could significantly undermine its strength.

This is where you would need to restore your tooth with a more solid option that can withstand heavier use.

Reasons You Might Need A Crown

Without a professional dental exam, it can be hard to know for sure whether you need a dental crown. Here are some of the reasons your dentist may suggest one.

  • Enamel is worn down by acid
  • Tooth structure has been lost due to excessive grinding
  • You have a large cavity
  • There are already too many old, large fillings in the tooth
  • Fractures/injuries
  • You want to improve the look of your tooth
  • You’ve just had a root canal and need to protect the tooth

Talk with your dentist if you think you might need a cap. You might be surprised to learn what other options you have. Schedule a consultation with your local office to find out which solution will help you hold onto your tooth for years to come.

Posted on behalf of:
The Newport Beach Dentist
1901 Westcliff Drive #6
Newport Beach, CA 92660
(949) 646-2481


Can’t You Just Fill It? Why Do I Need a Crown?

Posted in Crowns

With dental crowns costing more in terms of time and money, no one is ever thrilled to get a cap in lieu of a filling.

But why is your dentist pushing the crown over a filling?

It’s not the money-making scheme it may look like. There are legitimate reasons your tooth would do better with a crown than with a regular filling.

Crowns Vs. Fillings: Structural Differences

A crown isn’t a fancier version of a filling. A crown is to a filling what a skin graft is to a Band-Aid. Fillings merely patch up holes in a tooth. But when the damage goes beyond what a filling can repair, you’ll need a cap to preserve the structural integrity of your tooth.

Fillings are commonly made from a composite material that’s molded into a tooth. A crown is a restoration carved outside the mouth from a solid piece of material.

What Happened To Your Tooth?

The next logical point to consider is this: what does your tooth really need?

From your perspective, it might not look like there’s much going on with your tooth. But an x-ray could tell a very different story.

Dental imaging helps your dentist see beyond the surface to potential complications with bone, nerves, and blood vessels. An examination may reveal that your tooth is on the verge of developing an abscess or severe fracture and a crown could be just the ticket to buy you another five or ten years before needing a root canal.

So don’t wait too much longer! Get back to your dentist to find out more about the condition your tooth is in and what your best restorative options are.

Posted on behalf of:
Timber Springs Dental
5444 Atascocita Road Suite 100
Humble, TX 77346
(713) 244-8929


How Long Will a Cap on My Front Tooth Last?

Posted in Crowns

You can expect a cap on a front tooth to last as long as any other. Dental crowns have an average life expectancy of ten years. Some hold out for fifteen years or even longer.

Reasons for a crown to fail include:

  • Teeth-grinding habit
  • Decay
  • Trauma
  • Poor oral hygiene
  • Wear-and-tear

How To Make A Dental Cap Last

Dental crowns, like any other teeth, require regular cleaning to stay strong and beautiful. It may be a “permanent” cap and your tooth may feel nice and safe, but there is still a tiny margin where bacteria can sneak in. Don’t overlook your crown when it comes to brushing and flossing. Good hygiene can help your crown last at least a decade.

Disclaimers About Front Tooth Crowns

Crowning a tooth that shows when you smile typically takes more time than other crowns. This is because more detail and effort go into making it look nice. After all, it’s right there in the smile-zone where everyone will be looking!

That being the case, you’re going to want to be extra careful with your cap so that you don’t have to go through the process again. Every time you redo a crown, not only does it cost money, but it weakens your tooth.

It’s tempting to use teeth to open things like bags and packages and to tear off tags from clothing. Fight the inclination to use your teeth as tools! A crown could be damaged even more easily than a natural tooth.

Posted on behalf of:
Dr. David Kurtzman D.D.S.
611 Campbell Hill St. NW #101
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 980-6336


I Just Got a Crown. How Should I Care for It?

Posted in Crowns

Keeping your new dental crown clean is the best way to get the most out of it. In addition to having your teeth cleaned at the dentist’s office, you also need to clean it carefully at home.

Brushing and flossing are crucial to maintaining your crown long-term. Crowns tend to trap more plaque and calculus at their margins than natural teeth. It’s completely safe and highly recommended to brush thoroughly. You can’t scratch them with soft bristles.

If sugars and bacteria are left uncleaned and leak under the crown edges, the tooth will likely end up with a cavity – which is no easy fix. The dentist either has to “patch” the tooth with a filling or replace the crown all together (which we all know is expensive).

Don’t Be Afraid of it Falling Off

That simply won’t happen. It’s been attached with permanent cement that has bonded with the tubules within your natural tooth. It’s not going anywhere!

It’s understandable that you’re nervous. After all, you saw the dentist prep your tooth for a crown, and you know that the natural tooth underneath is a little smaller than those surrounding. It would be embarrassing if anyone could ever see that.

Just know how unlikely that is to ever happen. Dental cement does not have an easy bond to break. Crowns have an extremely tight fit to keep materials from leaking underneath and causing decay.

Long Term Maintenance

Keep your crown clean. Visit your dentist for regular check-ups at least every six months. Treat your crowns like you would your natural teeth or maybe even a little bit better. It was, after all, an investment. Invest a little time for excellent homecare, and you’re likely to be pleased with your purchase for years to come.

Posted on behalf of:
Wayne G. Suway, DDS, MAGD
1820 The Exchange SE #600
Atlanta, GA 30339
(770) 953-1752

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