Dental Tips Blog

May
20

How to Use Temporary Dental Cement to Replace a Crown

Posted in Crowns

Many people have lost dental crowns at inconvenient times. A dentist isn’t always around to make repairs immediately, especially if you’re on a business trip, vacation, or it’s 2am on a Saturday.

Here’s how to properly use the temporary dental cement if you wind up losing a dental restoration.

Check Your Tooth

If your tooth is in excruciating pain or there is some unusual swelling going on, call your dentist for advice. He or she may even recommend an emergency room visit if the office isn’t open.

Once you’re certain you’re okay, make sure your tooth is cleaned of debris. Check the inside of a crown to ensure it’s free of broken tooth pieces. If a lot of your tooth has shattered, just protect the spot (such as with a piece of sugar-free chewing gum) and wait for the dentist to address it. Otherwise, rinse out your mouth with warm water, pick up a dental cement, and get to work!

Cement Safely

In addition to the cement, you will need:

  • Mirror
  • Clean water
  • Towel
  • Floss
  • Toothpick
  • Toothbrush
  • Paperclip

Brush and floss your tooth clean. Use the paperclip to remove excess cement from the crown. Check the fit of the crown without placing any cement. Bite down lightly to make sure everything lines up. If it’s not fitting, try going in at different angles or cleaning the crown again.

Once you’re able to find the right fit, fill the crown with the cement. Place it securely on the tooth, let it set for longer than the instructions say, and use the toothpick and floss to clean up the excess. Brush your teeth afterwards, and you’re all set.

A temporary cement can help you keep on living your life until you’re able to see your dentist the next business day.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Apr
22

Why Are Dental Crowns So Expensive?

Posted in Crowns

Dental “caps” seem so small that most people wonder why they tend to cost three digits or more.

Are crowns really worth it? Why do they cost more than a filling?

A Crown Costs the Dentist, Too

Small though they are, dental crowns require a lot of behind-the-scenes work and support. Your dentist has to pay up front and help fund expenses such as:

  • Crown materials
  • Lab fees
  • Sterilization and other clinical equipment
  • Salaries for office staff
  • Rent/building expenses

Which Kind of Crown?

Varying crown materials and manufacturing techniques affect the price tag. Usually, the cheaper you go, the lower the quality. Crowns made from pure porcelain tend to cost more, but they look and feel the best.

What kind of crown you select doesn’t just depend on your budget, however.

You’ll need to make a decision based upon what’s best for your teeth. A poor choice made in haste because it’s the cheapest could end up costing you far more down the road to fix it.

How to Afford Your Next Dental Crown

With excellent oral care, hopefully you can put off getting a crown for a long time.

But if you end up needing one for your next cavity, you want to be prepared. Your local dental office can help you out here.

Your dentist will explain which restorative options are right for you. Then you can weigh your options in terms of cost versus quality. Whether you have insurance or not, the dental office staff will help you work out a payment plan that suits your circumstances.

Crowns may seem expensive, but a good quality one is a wise investment. Ask your dentist about other ways to afford a vital dental crown to save your smile.

Posted on behalf of:
Crabapple Dental
12670 Crabapple Rd #110
Alpharetta, GA 30004
(678) 319-0123

Mar
31

Does it Hurt to Get Your Tooth Crowned?

Posted in Crowns

Crowns add strength, security, and beauty to a smile by protecting teeth damaged by fracture or decay. Getting a dental crown is a very common procedure, but if you’ve never had it done before, it can be scary to contemplate.

What Happens in a Crown Procedure

The dentist trims away damaged parts of the tooth and shapes it, to leave a strong and solid core. He or she then takes an impression or scan to create a mold of the prepared tooth. This step also captures the layout of the opposite teeth’s chewing surface to make sure top of crown fits naturally in the bite.

None of has to hurt at all! Getting a dental crown feels about the same as getting a filling. Local anesthetic is placed around the tooth being worked on, so it’s perfectly numb. You may feel a little pressure on your tooth as the dentist works, but no pain.

Placing the Crown

Many dentists offer same day crowns.  These crowns are made right in the office while you wait and the entire process can be completed in a singe appointment.  If your dentist does not offer same day crowns, he or she will place a temporary crown to protect your tooth while you wait for your permanent crown to be made. Avoid chewing on your temporary and stay away from very hot or cold beverages.

Your dentist may or may not numb you up at the next appointment to remove the temporary crown. He or she will clean the tooth and tries on the permanent restoration. If it looks and feels good, it’s cemented in place.

You may experience some sensitivity as your tooth gets used to crown. This could take some weeks, but you shouldn’t feel any pain.

Contact your dentist if you have any questions about new or existing dental work.

Posted on behalf of:
Mundo Dentistry
3463 US-21 #101
Fort Mill, SC 29715
(704) 825-2018

Mar
27

Does Your Root Canal Really Need a Crown?

Posted in Crowns

You just put all that time and money into getting a root canal. What’s the point of putting a crown on it? The tooth feels just fine. It doesn’t hurt. You know that the nerve inside is long gone.

Your dentist isn’t arbitrarily suggesting that you get a dental crown. There are actually a couple of very good reasons that you should do so.

  1. Your tooth is now compromised.

Drilling into a tooth to extract the nerve and clean out any debris is a big event for such a little part of your body. Despite being filled with a strong material, your tooth is now very weak and susceptible to breaking under the pressure of your bite.

This might not happen right away. Some people seem to have gone years with an uncapped root canal and not had any problems. But why take that chance?

If your tooth fractures, it will likely be beyond repair. You’ll have to get the whole thing extracted and all the work for that root canal will have been for nothing.

  1. Your tooth will look much better with a crown.

A tooth that has been extensively cleaned out for a root canal won’t look like it used to. Perhaps a lot of decay discolored your tooth before the treatment. Capping it will help it blend in with the rest of your smile.

When You Don’t Need A Crown

Teeth that don’t experience too much bite pressure can get away with a filling alone after a root canal. These sometimes include front teeth and canines. As long as they didn’t lose too much structure during the endodontic treatment, they can possibly get by without a crown. Talk to your dentist to find out for sure.

Posted on behalf of:
Feather Touch Dental Care
1175 Peachtree St. NW Ste 1204
Atlanta, GA 30361
(404) 892-2097

Mar
6

Think Your Dental Crown is Too Big? What You Can Do

Posted in Crowns

Your dentist will always check the fit of a crown before cementing it in place. Take this opportunity to let him or her know whether you feel the cap looks too big.

You’d quickly notice whether a front tooth with a crown looks bigger than the rest.

But it can take a while for you to realize that a back tooth crown feels larger than it should. Once the anesthetic and sensitivity wear off, your crown may become more noticeable.

Why It Happens

Sometimes, it has to do with the way the crown was placed. If the cap isn’t properly positioned on the tooth, it can feel higher than the other teeth. You might sense that the capped tooth is the first one that you bite down on.

Alternatively, the crown itself may have a ridge or peak on the chewing surface that’s too high.

Why It’s Bad

You’ll be able to tell if something doesn’t fit right. In fact, your tongue may get tired from feeling it all day.

But it’s also bad news for your teeth. A poorly-fitted crown can wear down the opposing tooth it bites against. It can also stress the core and root of the tooth it’s covering. An uneven bite can tax your jaw, causing TMJ issues.

What to Do

Go see your dentist for an adjustment. If the crown is really off, then he or she may be able to reposition it.

The most common fix, however, is simply polishing down the high points on the crown. The dentist will use a special drill piece to remove areas that feel too big when you bite down.

Better yet, see a dentist who works closely with their lab and uses careful tools to assess the fit of your crown from the very get go!

Posted on behalf of:
Dental Care Center At Kennestone
129 Marble Mill Rd NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 424-4565

Feb
16

Why Do I Need a Crown if My Tooth Doesn’t Hurt?

Posted in Crowns

When a dentist recommends removing the outer layer of your tooth to make room for a costly crown, he or she has a good reason for doing so.

But your tooth isn’t bothering you, so why bother with a dental cap at all? 

Before it strikes a nerve

A tooth starts to hurt when the nerve deep inside is exposed to air or bacteria. Fracture and decay are the most common causes. It can take time for the damage to reach the nerve, however.

But therein lies the key: time.

These things don’t always happen overnight.

The damage can be well underway but you won’t realize it until it’s too late to save the tooth. By the time your it hurts, that could mean that the nerve is so damaged that you’re left with two options: extraction or root canal.

A dental crown is the way your dentist saves your tooth and protects the sensitive nerve within. This will buy you several more years to hold onto your natural tooth.

Need more proof?

Most dental offices are equipped with tools to detect problems and make them easier to avoid. Your dentist can use the following technology to show you where your situation lands in terms of seriousness:

  • X-rays
  • Photographs with an intraoral camera
  • Models and diagrams

Serious dental problems can take root long before you feel any symptoms. It’s scary news, but it’s the kind you can’t ignore.

Don’t let a fracture or abscess throw off your busy schedule and interfere with your life. Stay on top of your oral health by visiting your local dentist for regular dental checkups.

Posted on behalf of:
Soft Touch Dentistry
1214 Paragon Dr
O’Fallon, IL 62269
(618) 622-5050

Feb
13

What If You Don’t Have Time to Get a Dental Cap?

Posted in Crowns

One of the biggest reasons people put off dental treatment is because it can be inconvenient to a busy schedule.

Getting a dental crown, for example, can be a two-visit process. If there’s a holdup, then you may have to come in for a few additional appointments.

You just can’t afford to take that kind of time off from work.

Happily, more and more dental offices are turning to technology that cuts a huge chunk of time out of the crown-making process. This saves both you and your dentist a lot of time and money.

Dental Crowns in A Day

When technology makes advancements, dentistry is never far behind. Many dental practices now feature an on-site machine that manufactures dental crowns and other restorations right there in the office.

Additionally, these machines are often connected to computers with specialized design software. Instead of taking a messy impression of your tooth, the dentist simply scans it with an intraoral camera. The 3D image goes straight to the computer where your dentist can create the pattern.

The design goes right to the on-site milling machine which neatly carves the final restoration out of a solid piece of ceramic.

The best part? All of this can be done in just one visit.

Is A Single-Visit Crown Right For You?

These in-office one-appointment dental caps have been a lifesaver for many patients who are short on time. But keep in mind that this process has some limitations depending on what material or type of restoration is best for your tooth.

So, the next time you need a crown, ask your dentist whether this single-appointment crown technology is available near you.

Posted on behalf of:
Gold Hill Dentistry
2848 Pleasant Road #104
Fort Mill,  South Carolina 29708
(803) 566-8055

Feb
11

Will a Metal Crown Set Off an Airport Metal Detector?

Posted in Crowns

Getting through strict airport security can be a stressful event.

Everyone wants to make it calmly and quickly onto their plane. So if you accidentally set off a metal detector, you may feel a bit embarrassed, confused, and frustrated.

Dental restorations often include some sort of metal since many metals are strong, easy to shape, and accepted by our bodies.

One common dental concern people have when they get a new metal crown is: will my crown set off an airport metal detector?

What’s In a Metal Crown?

Metal crowns are often made from a mix of metals containing gold, which is not magnetic. In fact, most metals used in dental restorations are not magnetic.

Traditionally, metal detectors in airports scan for a magnetic response. So you’re more likely to set if off if you forget you’re wearing a metallic headband or belt buckle rather than because of having a dental crown!

However, most of today’s airports use body image scanners that are better at ignoring a small and non-threatening amount of metal, such as in a dental crown inside of your mouth.

Whether you have braces, a denture with metal clasps, fillings, an implant, or a metal crown, you should be perfectly fine going through airport security!

Why Switch to a White Dental Crown?

Metal crowns may be durable. But more patients are leaning towards getting tooth-colored restorations, anyway, for a couple reasons:

  • X-rays of all ceramic or porcelain crowns can show more of what’s going on around a tooth. Metal crowns aren’t see-through on x-rays so they can hide problems for a long time.
  • White crowns look better

Thinking of updating your metal crown? Talk with your local dentist to learn more.

Posted on behalf of:
Gilreath Dental Associates
200 White St NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 514-1224

Jan
29

Could Your Dental Crown Be Trying to Tell You Something?

Posted in Crowns

Dental crowns are meant to provide protection and structural support to weakened teeth. When it’s doing its job properly, a cap should be so comfortable that you don’t even know it’s there.

So if you notice any of these signs of premature wear on your crown, then it could be time to see your dentist about extending its mileage.

Your Crown Is Flattening

Is your crown looking a little less tooth-like these days? Dental crowns can wear down similarly to how teeth do if you have a habit of grinding your teeth. This shows up clearly on porcelain-covered metal crowns. Areas of heavy wear will show through as dark metal spots on the chewing surface.

Your Crown Shifts Around

A loose crown is a sign that the cement bond isn’t secure, if it was recently placed. Otherwise, it could mean that you have a cavity destroying the tooth beneath the cap.

The Crowned Tooth Is Getting More Sensitive

A little sensitivity is typical after getting a new crown. Your tooth needs time to adjust. But if your crown is only recently getting more sensitive, then that could mean there is a leak at the margin letting acids and bacteria sneak in.

Gums Around The Crowned Tooth Are Receding

Receded gums are fairly common with crowned teeth. But too much recession could indicate that your current cap is irritating the gum tissue. Sometimes, an open margin on the crown or excess cement underneath it could be to blame.

If your capped tooth is starting to feel a little strange, plan a visit to your dentist to get it looked at.

Posted on behalf of:
Buford Family Dental
4700 Nelson Grogdon Blvd. NE #210
Buford, GA 30518
678.730.2005

Jan
4

What Happens When You Get a Dental Crown

Posted in Crowns

The famous gold teeth of dental lore are the forerunners to today’s sleek and comfortable dental caps. While dental crowns can still be made out of gold, most patients seek out restorations made from more life-like materials like porcelain.

But you’ve probably wondered more than once: how is a crown placed?

First of all, you visit your dentist to find out if a crown is even the best option for your tooth. He or she will help you decide on a material that best suits the needs of your smile.

Appointment #1

To get started, the tooth is numbed with anesthetic and reshaped so it will fit under a “cap.” Next, a series of impressions is taken to make a mold for the crown and to get an idea of how your teeth fit together when you bite. This ensures your restoration feels natural when you chew on it. Afterwards, your dentist will place a temporary crown to protect the exposed tooth.

The whole first appointment usually takes less than an hour. Within two weeks, the dental lab will have finished up your final crown and your dentist will call you in to have it placed.

Appointment #2

This appointment should be even shorter than the first. Your dentist will lift off the temporary crown, check the fit of the new one, and then cement it in place. Once it’s bonded, the fit will be checked and adjusted again.

You’ll leave with some instructions for special care in the early days of getting a crown. Make sure to ask your dentist for suggestions on making your crown last as long as possible.

Posted on behalf of:
River Ranch Dental
203 George Hopper Rd #100
Midlothian, TX 76065
(469) 672-4245

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