Dental Tips Blog

Aug
7

Try a Crown in a Day!

Posted in Crowns

Gone are the days of waiting for weeks to get your new dental crown. Many dental offices are providing these restorations within a single visit. Is a same day crown right for you?

Crown In A Day – How?

CAD/CAM (Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Manufacturing) technology is an up-and-coming field in dentistry.

Dental practices are investing in technology that allows dentists to scan a tooth, virtually design a restoration, and mill it out in an on-site machine. All of this can happen in a single appointment.

In lieu of taking a messy impression of your prepared tooth, your dentist will simply take a picture with a special camera. The resulting virtual image becomes the template for designing your crown.

The milling machine hews a strong crown or bridge right out of a solid piece of ceramic. Your dentist will add the finishing touches, check the fit, and cement in place right then and there. No need for messing with a temporary!

Keep In Mind . . .

A single-visit crown is a great invention because of how much time you save. However, it tends to lack the handmade look of traditional porcelain crowns. That’s because the classic method allows master dental lab technicians to fine-tune the details. They know how to make a false tooth look just like a real one and they prepare it differently from the way the machine does.

You may prefer to have a crown for a front tooth designed the old-fashioned way, such as if it’s a tooth that will always be visible when you smile.

But bridges and crowns for your back teeth are no problem with CAD-CAM!

Talk with your dentist to find out what restorative options are right for your smile.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Jul
31

A Crown in a Day is Possible!

Posted in Crowns

There are a lot of things that hold people back from getting dental work done:

  • Cost
  • Fear of pain
  • Shortage of time

Fortunately, there are advances being made all over the dental healthcare system which are alleviating these common patient concerns.

For example, new technology has made it feasible for folks to get a new dental crown (from start to finish) in a single appointment.

The main reason you would ordinarily have to wait weeks to get your crown is because it’s crafted in an off-site dental lab. This option is still quite viable because of the high quality of restorations produced in labs.

But in the interest of saving time, a lot of dentists have turned to installing an in-office milling machine and computer system that complete the project in one step.

Here’s how it works:

If you need a crown, your dentist will let you know and then schedule the appointment. At this visit, the tooth is prepared (damaged parts are cleaned away) so that a crown can fit over it.

Next, he or she scans your tooth and its neighbors with a special camera. This step eliminates the need for messy impressions. The scan zips off to a computer where your dentist can digitally manipulate it to design the most precise restoration possible.

Finally, these plans go to the on-site machine which hews your new crown out of a solid block of ceramic. You’ll try it on right then and there for a secure fit.

No more fussing with a temporary crown or waiting weeks for lab-made adjustments. You only have to take one afternoon off to get a new crown.

If this process interests you, ask your dentist about the options available in your area.

Posted on behalf of:
Rolling Hills Dentistry
53 North Street
Danbury, CT 06810
(203) 743-0783

Jul
25

Do Dental Crowns Hurt?

Posted in Crowns

When you worry about dental crowns “hurting,” you might have these three areas in mind:

  • Dental crown placement procedure
  • Post-procedure recovery
  • Living with a dental crown

We’ll break these down one-by-one to clear up confusion and put your mind at ease regarding your first dental crown.

Is Getting A Crown Painful?

Not at all. It’s no more uncomfortable than a standard filling. You’ll get a numbing shot so that you don’t feel a thing the entire time.

Post-Placement Sensitivity

It’s possible to experience a little sensitivity for some time after you get a crown. This is because your tooth has to adjust to losing a big part of its outer layer. With time, it will get more tolerant of temperature change. This sensitivity is nothing compared to the pain you could experience if you didn’t get the crown. Sensitivity toothpaste can also help, if you have a small area of recession.

Life With A Dental Crown

Once you’re used to a crown, you probably won’t pay much attention to it, at all.

As long as the crown material you have is compatible with the teeth that will be biting down on it, you shouldn’t have any problems. On occasion, some crowns will be too hard for the natural teeth. That can cause some premature wear and sensitivity.

Your dentist will help you avoid this by recommending a material that’s right for your smile.

Just care for your crown the same way you do for your other teeth. Regular brushing and flossing and not biting down on ridiculously hard objects will keep it strong and comfortable for years to come.

Talk with your dentist about any other concerns you have about dental crowns.

Posted on behalf of:
Northampton Dental
24036 Kuykendahl Rd Suite 300
Tomball, TX 77375
(832) 639-6350

Jul
18

Is Your Dental Crown Wobbly? What This Means For You

Posted in Crowns

Sometimes, a dental crown comes loose soon after placement because the cement didn’t cure right.

But what if it’s been months or years since you got the crown?

Quite possibly, you have a habit of grinding and clenching your teeth. This would put a lot more force on a crown that it was designed to take. Over time, the restoration could just pop right off.

The most likely reason for a loose crown is decay that has worked its way underneath.

Whatever the reason, what should you do when your dental crown feels loose?

What To Do When Your Crown Is Loose

Carefully pinch your crown between two fingers and pull to see if you can pry it off. If it’s not budging, don’t force it. Just don’t chew on that tooth and get to the dentist’s as soon as possible. You don’t want to accidentally swallow it!

If you are able to slip the crown off with ease, then that’s fine. Check the inside of it for any signs that your tooth broke off with it. Clean it out with water and see if you can fit it back over your tooth.

Don’t try chewing on a tooth that’s lost a crown. Pick up a dental cement at your local drugstore to secure the cap. This will protect your tooth and the crown until you can see your dentist.

Is Your Crown Making You Nervous?

Sometimes, your crown might just feel a bit off without being loose.

Whether your crown needs to be readjusted, re-cemented, or replaced, your dentist will know best. Call your local dental office to schedule a visit as soon as possible.

Posted on behalf of:
Smile Avenue Family Dentistry
9212 Fry Rd #120
Cypress, TX 77433
(281) 656-1503

Jul
17

Make Your Teeth Strong and Beautiful!

Posted in Crowns

Sick of seeing those brittle, chipped, or deeply stained teeth in the mirror? Dental crowns could be your secret to a more beautiful and stronger smile.

How A Crown Could Improve Your Smile

If you have a tooth with severe decay or a deep fracture, then a filling might not be enough to patch it up. That’s where a crown comes in.

A crown replaces the outermost layer of enamel and covers all visible surfaces of your tooth. Made of gorgeous, durable materials like porcelain and ceramic, today’s crowns look just like natural teeth.

Your crown doesn’t just protect your damaged tooth. It also reinforces the tooth so that you can keep using it for as long as possible. Additionally, crowns are a great way to close the gaps between teeth and cover up other hard-to-fix imperfections.

Is A Crown Right For You?

If your tooth has only shallow aesthetic flaws, then a dental veneer may be enough to give it a face-lift.

The only way to find out for sure whether you need a crown is to have your dentist examine your tooth. Using x-rays and other diagnostic techniques, he or she will evaluate the amount and integrity of the tooth structure you have.

A crown often ends up being the best long-term cosmetic solution.

Your days of suffering with weak teeth or an unsightly smile are almost over! If you’re ready for a change, then the first step is only one dental consultation away.

Call your local dentist to schedule a visit where you’ll find out which restorative option will help your tooth the most.

Posted on behalf of:
Sycamore Hills Dentistry
10082 Illinois Rd
Fort Wayne, IN 46804
(260) 213-4400

Jun
20

Why You Should Get a Crown: 4 Reasons

Posted in Crowns

No one really ever wants to get another dental crown. But there are some good reasons why you should seriously consider your dentist’s recommendation.

  1. Give Your Tooth A Few More Years

Crowning a tooth buys you more time than a filling would. This is especially true if you have a deep cavity. Getting a filling could be a real gamble – you don’t know for sure if it will keep the decay out. A dental crown, on the other hand, is a much neater and more complete solution. It could even allow you to put off the need for a root canal.

  1. Change Your Smile’s Entire Look

Sometimes, a crown is simply a good way to change the look of a front tooth that is:

  • Deeply stained
  • Misshapen
  • Chipped
  • Rough-textured

It’s usually a great idea to just crown a tooth with extensive cosmetic damage.

  1. Prevent Wear From Grinding And Clenching

A habit of grinding and clenching your teeth at night is a sure way to wear down tooth enamel. Crowning a tooth or two might be the best way you can prevent severe fractures.

It’s also a good idea to look into devices (such as splints or night guards) that will prevent your grinding tendency from damaging teeth and restorations.

  1. Fill In An Empty Space

How does a crown do that?

Crowning a couple otherwise healthy teeth could allow you to connect the gap between them with a dental bridge. That’s because these dental crowns play a key role in supporting fixed each end of a bridge.

How else can a crown benefit your smile and dental health in general? Ask your dentist by scheduling a visit.

Posted on behalf of:
Meadowbrook Family Dental
8848 Calvine Rd #120
Elk Grove, CA 95828
(916) 912-4126

Jun
20

Will a Filling Be Enough for My Chipped Tooth?

Posted in Crowns

If you’ve recently chipped your tooth, you probably want it fixed yesterday.

Not every dental problem can be fixed with a simple filling. What are your options?

Dental Bonding For A Cosmetic Fix

Are you worried about how a chipped front tooth looks? Dental bonding is your most helpful solution.

Bonding is when your dentist uses a little putty-like resin to reshape the missing part of your tooth. He or she chooses a color that matches your tooth, cures the material after shaping it, and polishes it for a seamless finish.

Cosmetically bonded teeth are not very strong, so this fix is best for front teeth that don’t experience a lot of chewing force.

Filling-Crown Hybrid For Strength

Onlays and inlays are considered “indirect fillings.”

That means they are created outside the mouth and then cemented into your tooth like a piece in a puzzle. They are sometimes called partial crowns for this reason, as well.

Although they don’t cover the entire tooth the way a crown does, indirect fillings will provide more support for teeth like molars that are missing a big chunk of their structure.

When Damage Runs Deep

Do you know how badly your tooth is fractured?

Even if it looks like only a small piece broke off, you should still get it x-rayed. An x-ray is the only way to see inside your tooth to find out whether the fracture is endangering the nerve chamber.

If the nerve, or pulp, of your tooth is compromised, your dentist may recommend a root canal and dental crown.

Clearly, a filling isn’t always the fix your tooth needs! For all of your dental restoration questions and concerns, contact your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Definition Dental
12850 SW Canyon Rd
Beaverton, OR 97005
(503) 644-8900

Jun
4

Why Is My Crowned Tooth So Sensitive?

Posted in Crowns

It’s not unusual to complain of a sensitive dental crown. Take a look at the following common explanations to see if any of them fits your situation:

Newly Crowned Teeth

A lot of teeth are a bit sensitive for some time after getting a dental crown. The tooth isn’t exactly used to having its enamel replaced with a foreign material. Give your tooth a week or two to settle down and see if it adjusts.

What Is Your Crown Made Of?

Some materials are not so great at insulating your tooth. Crowns made of metal can quickly zap your tooth when you drink hot coffee or take a bite of ice cream. With time, your tooth can adjust to this, as well.

Check The Fit

If the dental cap slips a bit while it’s setting or has too much cement under it, this will affect your bite. Your tooth will probably be sensitive as a result and the dentist will have to adjust it for an even bite.

Extent Of Damage

Teeth that lost a lot of their natural structure are simply more exposed to the environment. If your tooth had decay very close to its core, the nerves there will be much more sensitive. If this sensitivity worsens, you may end up needing a root canal.

Recession Around Your Crown

It might not even be the crown at all that’s causing you problems.

If your gum line is receding or rolling away from the crown, then the tooth’s root surface will be exposed. That’s a very sensitive part of your tooth!

See your dentist as soon as possible if you experience any new symptoms or if your sensitivity gets worse.

Posted on behalf of:
Gwinnett Family Dental Care
3455 Lawrenceville Hwy
Lawrenceville, GA 30044
(770) 921-1115

May
25

Are You Paying Too Much for Your Dental Crown?

Posted in Crowns

You were quite proud of your lovely new crown. . . until a friend from across the country told you they paid a fraction of what you did for their own restoration.

What’s going on here? Is this dental extortion?

There are a lot of different factors affecting the cost of a crown.

Geographic Location

Prices at a particular practice are set based on the needs of that office. In the local economy, dental materials, lab services, utilities, and rent could be very steep. That will affect how high the dentist has to price his or her dental crowns.

If you need to find something that suits your budget a little better, it doesn’t hurt to shop around at offices outside of where you live.

Location in Your Mouth

Did you need to cap a front tooth that shows when you smile? Was your crown restoring a back molar? Crowning a dental implant?

The kind of support your tooth needs determines which type of dental crown you need. There is no one-size-fits-all crown.

More Than a Crown

You’re not responsible for just the cost of the crown, alone. As with any other procedure, you’ll have the quoted price and then the total price which adds in all the lab fees, exam fees, diagnostic fees, and such.

How Much Should You Pay?

Fees without insurance vary widely, but rough averages for here in the United States when you’re paying out of pocket usually cost around the following amounts:

  • Porcelain – $1,400
  • Porcelain-fused-to-metal – $1,000
  • Metal – $1,300

Insurance benefits could help out a lot in defraying costs. Even if you don’t have insurance, ask your dental office about any savings options or provisions for financing your treatment.

Posted on behalf of:
Touchstone Dentistry
2441 FM 646 W Suite A
Dickinson, TX 77539
(832) 769-5202

May
3

Are Metal Crowns Going Out of Style?

Posted in Crowns

A combination of gold and other metals have been used to restore teeth for a long time. But few people these days appreciate the look of metal teeth. Dentistry today has the multi-purpose aim of being conservative, durable, and cosmetic.

That’s why tooth-colored dental crowns came into the picture.

Why More People Are Avoiding Metal Crowns

Not only can metal crowns be visually unappealing, but there are other reasons to choose an alternative.

First of all, metal gives you zero visibility in x-rays. Metal shows up as bright white on radiographs because the radiation energy can’t pass through it. This prevents your tooth from showing up on the image. Any part covered by metal is impossible to see without physically removing the crown.

What if a cavity grows in the tooth under the crown? Tough luck. You might not notice it until it’s quite large. White dental caps on the other hand, let your dentist check more of the tooth for signs of decay before it advances.

When a Metal Crown is a Good Choice

For some folks, having a gold tooth is their cosmetic preference. Additionally, metal caps tend to withstand wear longer than ceramic ones. If you already have a gold crown, it’s a good idea to crown an opposing tooth with the same material.

Ultimately, it’s up to you and your dentist to decide which kind of crown is best for your smile. There’s no one solution that works for everyone! While more techniques are coming out for restoring teeth, a gold crown is still a viable option. Talk with your dentist to find out more.

Posted on behalf of:
Springfield Lorton Dental Group
5419-C Backlick Rd
Springfield, VA 22151
(703) 256-8554

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