Dental Tips Blog

Oct
9

Basic Denture Do’s and Don’ts

Posted in Dentures

It’s easy to slack off when it comes to proper denture use and care. Hey, we all need reminders from time to time, and especially when we get into bad habits. Denture care is no exception. Keep your mouth healthy and your denture strong for as long as possible with these simple tips.

DO soak your denture anytime it’s not in use to prevent stain and keep it moist.

DON’T ever soak your denture in bleach to attempt lightening tooth color!

DO clean your denture with a denture brush to remove debris daily.

DON’T use any household tools to attempt to chip away tartar or stain.

DO use warm water with an effervescent denture cleaner tablet.

DON’T place your denture in hot water which can warp the acrylic.

DO use a denture adhesive to enhance the security of the fit.

DON’T use a denture adhesive to compensate for an ill-fitting denture.

DO use a gentle hand soap or dish liquid to cleanse your denture, if needed.

DON’T reach for any abrasive household scrubbing products!

DO give your gums time to “breathe” each day.

DON’T sleep in your denture since this promotes infection and dry mouth.

DO clean your mouth and gums daily with gauze or a soft toothbrush.

DON’T ever attempt to clean your dentures with denture chemicals while wearing them.

To make sure your denture is still fitting comfortably and that your current denture care routine is working, see your local dentist. Your dentist will also keep you updated on any changes in the tissues of your mouth.

Don’t procrastinate – do schedule your visit today!

Posted on behalf of:
ABQ Dentures
2010 Wyoming Blvd NE
Albuquerque, NM 87112
(505) 933-7794

Sep
29

What Are Permanent Dentures? Are They Right for You?

Posted in Dentures

“Permanent dentures” is not a real thing in dentistry. Most people Googling the term are just searching for a tooth replacement option that they don’t have to worry about falling out. A set-it-and-forget-it kind of deal.

If you’re looking for something a little more secure than traditional dentures, then you may be interested in either:

An implant supported overdenture

–or–

A fixed hybrid denture/extended bridge

Overdentures And Fixed Bridges – What’s The Difference?

Both of these options use dental implants for support. Both can replace a full arch of teeth.

But the main difference is that an overdenture is basically a regular denture with attachments that snap onto implants while the fixed hybrid/extended bridge is far more conservative and you can’t remove it.

Implant overdentures are usually made of acrylic. They have wide borders that provide more facial support and cover the gums. An upper overdenture will cover the palate. If you had one of these, you would still have to take it out at night and clean it daily, like any other denture.

Fixed implant bridges or hybrid dentures are made from metal and porcelain and may not cover the gums. They are screwed in place by your dentist and are only removed by your dentist for maintenance. You continue to brush just as if you had natural teeth.

Why Go Permanent?

Either of these options will keep your teeth from putting pressure on your gums. The implants will actually help to preserve the shape of the bone you have left. Both will give you a secure bite.

To find out whether these more “permanent” denture solutions are right for your smile, plan a visit to your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Marvin Village Dentistry
8161 Ardrey Kell Road
Suite 101
Charlotte, NC 28277
(704) 579-5513

Sep
27

The Best Possible Denture Cleaning Routine

Posted in Dentures

Regular denture maintenance is key to keeping your oral appliance functional and comfortable. You can minimize costly accidents, repairs, and treatments associated with dental health by making sure your denture is always as clean as possible.

Here’s what you can do to keep your denture comfortable, beautiful, and strong:

Rinse after eating – every time.

Don’t wait until it’s time to scrub your dentures. You should give them a brief rinse every time you eat. This is especially important after eating foods that could leave deep stains on your denture.

Clean your mouth.

A clean denture in itself isn’t enough. Germs and food debris left in your mouth can transfer back to your denture. Carefully brush and floss remaining teeth daily. If there are no teeth left, remember to clean your tongue, wipe your gums, and freshen up with a rinse before putting your false teeth back in place.

Brush your denture.

Just dunking your hands in water is no way to wash them. Similarly, your denture needs more than a quick rinse. Scrub your denture at least daily with a soft denture-safe brush. This will minimize stain and tartar.

Soak your denture.

When not in use, especially overnight, your denture needs to soak in a denture solution or plain water. The acrylic will stay supple and you’ll maintain the proper-fitting shape longer.

Handle with care.

It’s easy to drop a slippery and delicate denture while trying to clean it. When handling your appliance, avoid pressing on metal parts or scrubbing hard. Always clean it over a surface cushioned with a towel.

For more tips on extending the life and function of your denture, contact your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Short Pump Family Dentistry
201 Towne Center West Blvd
Suite 709
Richmond, VA 23233
804-332-5505

Sep
22

Dentures: How They’re Made

Posted in Dentures

Wondering how people get such realistic-looking “false teeth?”

Long gone are the days of using outdated materials or even natural wood/bone as they did in centuries prior to ours. Today’s denture process results in smiles that are as beautiful as they are functional.

Measuring Your Mouth

The first step in denture fabrication is determining your mouth’s shape so that a denture is the right size. A dentist starts by taking an impression with a putty material. Once the impression sets, it serves as the base for creating a cast model.

Stone models are then set up on an articulator, or frame, which helps the denture designers to determine at which point the teeth should meet.

Creating the Denture

Typically, the dentist sends the models and measurements to a dental lab for designing the actual denture. Some dentists are able to do it themselves.

Either way, the next step is placing wax over the model’s “gums.” Then, false teeth selected to match the shape you want are placed into the wax wherever teeth are needed.

Once the whole layout looks correct, the model gets put in liquid stone which holds the teeth in place when it hardens. After that sets, the wax in the model is boiled away and acrylic is poured in, to fill out the gums and palate.

The denture comes out ready for try-on.

Interested in a Denture?

Dentures are great substitutes for teeth that have been lost to decay, trauma, or gum disease.

But having a quality denture made can take a little time, what with all the adjusting and sending back-and-forth. Your new teeth could take around five separate appointments to have made.

So if you’re thinking about getting a denture, then contact your dentist soon to set up a consultation.

Posted on behalf of:
Marvin Village Dentistry
8161 Ardrey Kell Road
Suite 101
Charlotte, NC 28277
(704) 579-5513

Sep
19

Signs You May Have Oral Thrush

Posted in Dentures

Thrush is a fungal infection that can cause some considerable discomfort in your mouth. People at risk for getting oral thrush include those who:

  • Wear dentures
  • Smoke cigarettes
  • Are taking antibiotics or corticosteroids
  • Are having treatment for cancer

Thrush is most common among babies and infants and tends to affect those with a weakened immune system.

If you struggle with a condition such as diabetes or HIV infection, then your body is prone to an imbalance in natural bacteria. Couple that with weak immunity, and a fungal infection can take off with little trouble.

What to Look For

Some of the main signs of a thrush infection include:

White bumps or coating. A pale coating on the tongue, gums, cheeks, and throat is a pretty sure sign of a fungal infection.

Pain and dryness. Cracks at the corners of the mouth may make it painful to eat.

Difficulty swallowing.

Bleeding. If the white patches in your mouth bleed when you bump them (like with a toothbrush), then that’s almost a giveaway for thrush.

In babies, thrush may cause irritability and affect the child’s ability to eat.

Keep in mind that these symptoms may only show up once your case advances. Early stages of thrush can be hard to identify on your own.

How To Avoid A Thrush Infection

Add some probiotics into your diet any time you take an antibiotic. If you use an inhaler that contains corticosteroids, make sure that you rinse your mouth well afterwards. Above all, great oral hygiene is the biggest key to preventing a thrush infection. This involves daily brushing and flossing and removing/cleaning your denture every night.

Find out more about oral fungal infections by scheduling a consultation with your dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Ambler Dental Care
602 S Bethlehem Pike C-2
Ambler, PA 19002
(215) 643-1122

Aug
30

4 Reasons You Should Be Soaking Your Dentures Every Night

Posted in Dentures

You’ve heard it over and over before: take your denture out every night and soak it.

It’s easy to get a little lazy in this matter. Can you really help it if you accidentally fall asleep with your denture in? Even still, these four reasons can help you to see the light and remember to take your dentures out as your dentist directs.

  1. Decrease In Saliva

Saliva is essential to digestion and keeping your mouth comfortable. It also strengthens remaining teeth against decay. Additionally, saliva fights bacteria that cause bad breath and disease.

Whether due to aging, medication, or simply the presence of the denture itself, your saliva production may be slowing down. This is a bad thing in the wake of an increase of bacteria your mouth sees as you get older.

It’s good to take your denture out for a while so that the germs can’t multiply as quickly.

  1. Dentures Provide The Perfect Bacteria Hideout

Most dentures are made of acrylic which is loaded with tiny pores you can’t easily see. These pores pack in with bacteria throughout the course of the day. Soaking is the best way to lower the microbe count and thoroughly clean your denture.

  1. Soaking Lifts Stain

A stain-lifting denture solution is the best way to keep your dentures sparkling. Soaking your denture makes it easier for you to brush residue away the next morning.

  1. Your Gums Need A Break!

Constant pressure and friction from a denture can irritate the gums and make the bone resorb faster. Cut that wear time in half by soaking your dentures at night.

Talk with your dentist for more expert tips on denture care.

Posted on behalf of:
Avalon Dental Group P.C.
2205 Williams Trace Blvd #108
Sugar Land, TX 77478
(281) 240-5559

Aug
29

Can You Whiten Your Denture Teeth?

Posted in Dentures

It only adds insult to injury when your replacement teeth start to stain and darken.

Even though you’re anxious to try anything to whiten your dentures, caution is needed.

The most common temptation is to use household cleaning chemicals to bleach false teeth or even to use denture products more than/longer than directed. But doing so can permanently damage your dentures or irritate your mouth.

The Best Way To Whiten Dentures

Start out by just giving your denture a thorough scrubbing. Use a denture brush and a mild hand soap or denture cleaner. Use firm but gently pressure when you scrub. Handle your appliance over a cushioned surface so that it won’t break if it slips out of your hand.

For some, all their dentures needed was a decent scrubbing. How does yours look now?

If you want even brighter results, soak your denture overnight in a specially formulated denture cleaner. There are products on the market specifically for lifting stain from dentures. At most, you’ll probably only need to soak your teeth in this once a week.

Need Something Stronger?

As an additional or supplementary step, try an at-home ultrasonic denture cleaner. This tends to be the most thorough way you can clean your denture, anyway. It’s the same technology used at your dental office and is the best and safest way to whiten your denture.

Keep your dentures bright by avoiding dark-colored foods, cleaning them regularly, and not using tobacco. Over time, stain buildup may prompt you to get a new set altogether. Talk with your dentist about your options for enjoying a whiter smile with dentures.

Posted on behalf of:
Heritage Dental
23945 Franz Rd Suite A
Katy, TX 77493
(832) 709-2429

Aug
7

What to Do When Your Lower Denture Won’t Stay in Place

Posted in Dentures

When a denture doesn’t fit right, it’s usually because of a problem with the lower jaw.

The lower half of your mouth is a tough spot to fit.

This could be due to any combination of reasons:

  • Atrophied (lost) bone
  • Jawbone ridge is too narrow to support a denture
  • There’s too much loose tissue around the jaw that moves around
  • You can’t get suction the way you do on the palate
  • Your lower jaw experiences more movement than the upper half

Is there anything you can do to fight back? Let’s start with the simplest solution and work our way up.

Try a denture adhesive. Even a well-fitting lower denture may feel unstable. Using a small amount of paste may give you all the reassurance you need.

Get your denture adjusted. It may just be time to get your denture relined. If you’re layering on the adhesive, then it’s time to get your denture some professional help.

Cut off a few ties. Your gums attach to your tongue and lips by thin bands of skin. These bands can affect the way your denture fits. Gently reshaping them free could improve the fit of your denture.

Consider implant support. The surest way to securely anchor your lower denture is to use dental implants. They don’t have to be large or many – a couple short implants may be sufficient. Your denture will get fitted with buttons that snap onto the implants.

Sooner or later, you will need to see your dentist about your loose denture. He or she will help you identify the exact problem and recommend a fitting solution.

Posted on behalf of:
Springfield Lorton Dental Group
5419-C Backlick Rd
Springfield, VA 22151
(703) 256-8554

Jul
31

Caring for Aging Smiles

Posted in Dentures

You may be worried for a loved one who’s going through the aging process. Or perhaps you’re concerned about what the future holds for you, personally.

Either way, the following tips can help ensure a strong, comfortable, and confident smile for years to come. It’s never too late to improve oral hygiene!

Adjust To Mobility Limitations

Conditions like arthritis and Parkinson’s can affect someone’s ability to keep their teeth clean. If you or a loved one suffer from limited mobility, consider switching to a toothbrush with a larger handle for easy grasp. Powered toothbrushes are ideal in this case.

Be Careful With Dentures

Just because dentures replace teeth doesn’t make them any less important. They should be handled with care, cleaned daily, and soaked often. A clean denture is a healthier one. These principles also apply to partial dentures and other appliances that could irritate the mouth.

Be Aware Of Changes In Your Mouth

Medications and just the factor of aging itself can affect the oral environment in surprising ways. Some common problems include:

  • Fungal infections (especially with a denture)
  • Dry mouth
  • Gum recession
  • Sensitive teeth

While these problems may be hard to avoid, there’s still something you can do. Good hygiene is critical to strengthening teeth. Your dentist will have suggestions for products and devices that make oral hygiene easy.

Most importantly, be reasonable in your expectations. Some age-related changes might make it harder to clean teeth. Focus on keeping yourself (or your loved one) comfortable and healthy.

Let your dentist help preserve you and your family’s smiles despite the challenges of aging. Contact your local dental office to schedule a visit.

Posted on behalf of:
Noble Smiles Dentistry
9779 E. 146th St.
Noblesville IN 46060
(317) 893-3992

Jul
25

4 Signs You Should See Your Dentist For a Denture Adjustment or Repair

Posted in Dentures

It’s nice to think that once you get a set of false teeth you’ll never have to worry about them again. On the contrary, although they aren’t the same as natural teeth, you still have a big responsibility on your hands.

Or on your gums, rather.

Getting your denture adjusted and repaired on a regular basis is healthier for your mouth and can even extend the life of your appliance.

  1. Sores On Gums

A loose denture will chafe uncomfortably against soft tissues in your mouth. That’s definitely not normal for a denture. If the fit isn’t improved, those sore spots will only get worse until you can’t bear to wear your denture at all.

  1. Using Lots Of Adhesive

A little denture paste or cream goes a long way. In fact, the better your denture fits, the better the adhesive works. But if you find yourself dabbing on more paste than usual to hold your denture down, it may be time to have it tightened a bit.

  1. Slipping

Is your sandwich just not chewing the way it usually does?

Either the bread is stale, or your dentures don’t have a stable fit anymore. Over time, your jawbone shrinks under the pressure of dentures. Your appliance will need to be adjusted to compensate for those changes.

  1. Small Cracks

If your denture still fits, you might not think a small nick or hairline fracture is a big deal. But it will get bigger the longer it’s left there. It also provides a hideout for smelly bacteria and fungus.

Ask your dentist about the right time to get a denture adjustment.

Posted on behalf of:
Columbine Creek Dentistry
4760 W Mineral Ave #60
Littleton, CO 80128
(720) 636-9010

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