Dental Tips Blog

Mar
27

Does It Hurt to Get Your Teeth Cleaned? These Tips Can Help

It’s time for your 2 o’clock dental visit and you can’t shake that familiar feeling of dread.

You’re scheduled for a teeth cleaning and you already know how it’s going to go: the pain, the sensitivity, the doubt that the torture will ever end.

If you’re tired of each routine dental cleaning going this way, then the following tips are just what you need.

  1. Ask for Anesthetic.

Sensitive gums may be where your discomfort originates. The hygienist can apply a thin layer of topical numbing jelly to help them relax for your cleaning session. You can even as for laughing gas if you want!

  1. Use Desensitizing Toothpaste.

Most patients have sensitive teeth right after a cleaning. Use a dab of desensitizing paste like a conditioner for your teeth every time after brushing. Do this on a regular basis to strengthen your enamel before your next dental visit.

  1. Lose Yourself.

Sometimes, you just mentally have to go to your safe place. If you don’t focus on the work that’s going on in your mouth, it will be easier to endure the necessary evil.

Bring an audiobook or favorite calming playlist to listen to through headphones and let yourself just drift away.

  1. Switch Cleaning Tools.

Some patients are very sensitive to the ultrasonic instruments that work the fastest for removing tartar. If your hygienist is using an automated tool to clean your teeth and it hurts, you can ask him or her to switch to the hand tools for a while to give your teeth a break. For some people it’s the other way around.

A little honest communication and preparation are all that’s needed to make a dental cleaning more comfortable. Contact your dental office for more help in surviving your next trip!

Posted on behalf of:
Dunwoody Family & Cosmetic Dentistry
1816 Independence Square, Suite B
Dunwoody, GA 30338
(770) 399-9199

Feb
11

How to Fight Tooth Decay with Diet

You’ve heard that eating a lot of sugar leads to cavities. But you may not realize how big of a role your overall diet plays in determining your cavity risk.

Here are a few changes you might make to your family’s eating habits:

Drink More Water

Beverages are a major source of the sugars that contribute to tooth decay. They literally soak the teeth in sugar for minutes at a time. Sweet drinks provide fuel for cavity-causing bacteria and they also impact the acidity of the mouth, which is what causes enamel erosion.

Cut back on sweetened drinks by encouraging your family to switch to water. This will keep the mouth hydrated and your teeth cleaner.

Eat Fresh

Fresh fruits and veggies are great sources of water (which helps clean teeth) and fiber. The fiber is good for your digestive health, but it also does your teeth a favor. Natural fibers in plants help scrub away cavity-causing plaque and sugar while you chew.

Who knew an apple a day could keep the dentist away?

Get More Fiber

Speaking of fiber, you can get similar dental health benefits by upgrading your processed carbs to high-fiber whole grains. The hearty texture can wick away bacteria and slows down plaque-formation, unlike simpler carbohydrates.

Say Cheese!

Dairy is the perfect snack for strong tooth enamel. Minerals found in dairy products such as calcium are necessary for remineralizing the structure of weak teeth. Cheese in particular is good for preventing decay since its tangy flavor stimulates saliva flow. Your teeth rely on saliva to stay clean and to soak up more minerals!

Modest changes in your diet along with routine dental exams and checkups can help fight tooth decay and prevent cavities. Want more tips on keeping your smile healthy, naturally? Visit your dentist or hygienist to learn more.

Posted on behalf of:
Group Health Dental
230 W 41st St
New York, NY 10036
(212) 398-9690

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