Dental Tips Blog

Feb
16

Why Do I Need a Crown if My Tooth Doesn’t Hurt?

Posted in Crowns

When a dentist recommends removing the outer layer of your tooth to make room for a costly crown, he or she has a good reason for doing so.

But your tooth isn’t bothering you, so why bother with a dental cap at all? 

Before it strikes a nerve

A tooth starts to hurt when the nerve deep inside is exposed to air or bacteria. Fracture and decay are the most common causes. It can take time for the damage to reach the nerve, however.

But therein lies the key: time.

These things don’t always happen overnight.

The damage can be well underway but you won’t realize it until it’s too late to save the tooth. By the time your it hurts, that could mean that the nerve is so damaged that you’re left with two options: extraction or root canal.

A dental crown is the way your dentist saves your tooth and protects the sensitive nerve within. This will buy you several more years to hold onto your natural tooth.

Need more proof?

Most dental offices are equipped with tools to detect problems and make them easier to avoid. Your dentist can use the following technology to show you where your situation lands in terms of seriousness:

  • X-rays
  • Photographs with an intraoral camera
  • Models and diagrams

Serious dental problems can take root long before you feel any symptoms. It’s scary news, but it’s the kind you can’t ignore.

Don’t let a fracture or abscess throw off your busy schedule and interfere with your life. Stay on top of your oral health by visiting your local dentist for regular dental checkups.

Posted on behalf of:
Soft Touch Dentistry
1214 Paragon Dr
O’Fallon, IL 62269
(618) 622-5050

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