Dental Tips Blog

May
20

How to Use Temporary Dental Cement to Replace a Crown

Posted in Crowns

Many people have lost dental crowns at inconvenient times. A dentist isn’t always around to make repairs immediately, especially if you’re on a business trip, vacation, or it’s 2am on a Saturday.

Here’s how to properly use the temporary dental cement if you wind up losing a dental restoration.

Check Your Tooth

If your tooth is in excruciating pain or there is some unusual swelling going on, call your dentist for advice. He or she may even recommend an emergency room visit if the office isn’t open.

Once you’re certain you’re okay, make sure your tooth is cleaned of debris. Check the inside of a crown to ensure it’s free of broken tooth pieces. If a lot of your tooth has shattered, just protect the spot (such as with a piece of sugar-free chewing gum) and wait for the dentist to address it. Otherwise, rinse out your mouth with warm water, pick up a dental cement, and get to work!

Cement Safely

In addition to the cement, you will need:

  • Mirror
  • Clean water
  • Towel
  • Floss
  • Toothpick
  • Toothbrush
  • Paperclip

Brush and floss your tooth clean. Use the paperclip to remove excess cement from the crown. Check the fit of the crown without placing any cement. Bite down lightly to make sure everything lines up. If it’s not fitting, try going in at different angles or cleaning the crown again.

Once you’re able to find the right fit, fill the crown with the cement. Place it securely on the tooth, let it set for longer than the instructions say, and use the toothpick and floss to clean up the excess. Brush your teeth afterwards, and you’re all set.

A temporary cement can help you keep on living your life until you’re able to see your dentist the next business day.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

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