Dental Tips Blog

Jan
10

Do You Need to Brush Your Dog’s Teeth?

For some of us, our dog is more than our best friend – he or she is family.  We’ll do anything for our cold-nosed companions! True dog lovers will go out of their way to get the perfect food formulas, the perfect accessories, and the perfect hair cut for their pets.

One important element of dog health is dental care. Yes, pooches need that too, and once again, those die-hard dog fans are already all over that.

Caring For Dog’s Teeth: What To Know

Dogs are not very susceptible to cavities. But like us, they can develop the heavy tartar buildup and bad breath that accompany gum disease. If not treated, gum inflammation can lead to serious health problems. Daily brushing is a great way to prevent bacterial buildup in your dog’s mouth.

What You Need

A pet store will have toothbrushes and toothpastes appropriate for dogs. NEVER use human toothpaste! Most of our toothpastes contain fluoride which is great for our teeth, but like chocolate, it’s not meant for dogs. Hard chew toys are good for cleansing dog teeth.

What To Do

Start small. You can ease your dog into brushing by starting when they’re young. Brush only for as long as they’ll tolerate, slowly increasing the brushing time each day. Reward your pooch’s cooperation with a treat.

Don’t forget that you need dental care, too! People need routine dental cleanings and checkups twice a year and daily brushing and flossing. We’re more prone to dental health problems than dogs are. To find out what your teeth need to stay healthy and strong, visit your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Amber Hills Dental
771 E. Horizon Dr
Suite 176-180
Henderson, NV 89015
702-831-4686

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