Dental Tips Blog

Mar
30

How Does a Dental Implant Work?

Posted in Dental Implants

By design, dental implants are essentially an “artificial root” that is inserted into the jaw, where a missing tooth once stood. This titanium rod fuses with your bone and supports the desired fixed prosthesis (“false tooth.”)

Implants are able to support a variety of restorations, including fixed crowns and bridges. Alternatively, one or more implants can be used to secure a denture. While the implant stays put, the denture may be permanently affixed or removable. Implants themselves are not removable.

Phases of Implant Treatment

In a straightforward outpatient procedure, the dentist makes an incision in the gums and carefully inserts the implant in the bone underneath.

Next comes a healing period. The gums have to close over the implant to give it time to fuse (osseointegrate) with the bone. This usually takes 3-6 months to complete.

Once the metal implant takes to the bone, it’s strong enough to go to work. The dentist then removes the protective covering to place the restoration of choice. This is usually a crown that looks and feels like a natural tooth.

Dental implants don’t feel much different from real teeth. But if you get one, you’d still need to keep it clean in order to avoid getting an infection that could cause it to fail.

An Alternative Option to Replace Missing Teeth

Due to their predictability and longevity, implants offer a convenient advantage over traditional dentures and fixed bridges.

What are benefits to getting an implant?

  • Easy cleaning and care
  • Smiling and laughing with confidence
  • Cosmetic enhancement in addition to the medical benefits
  • No diet limitations

Contact your dentist today to learn more about implants and whether you’re a candidate for one.

Posted on behalf of:
Grateful Dental
2000 Powers Ferry Rd SE #1
Marietta, GA 30067
(678) 593-2979

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