Dental Tips Blog

Dec
27

4 Signs of Bruxism (Teeth Grinding)

Do you clench or grind your teeth? It might happen when you sleep, on your drive home from work, or even when you’re stressed out during the day. Chronic bruxism can cause a lot of problems for your smile.  Here are 4 signs that you might notice if bruxism is a problem for your smile:

Flattened Teeth

It’s easy to see how grinding your teeth could make your teeth flat. Even though tooth enamel is the strongest thing in your entire body, grinding teeth against one another can still make them wear down. You may see flat enamel in the front of your mouth or starting on the cusps of your back teeth.

Enamel Worn Away at the Necks of Your Teeth

As you grind your jaws together, your teeth will flex just a very small amount. This flexion occurs along the necks of your teeth. You may not notice it until a significant amount of grinding has occurred. At first you will see some mild gum recession, but then you will notice large notches in your enamel, almost as if someone was chipping away at your tooth just next to the gumlines.

Broken Restorations

Fillings and crowns will start to break, chip, or crack under too much pressure. Yes, these restorations are made to withstand normal biting and chewing, but if you have bruxism, that’s more pressure than teeth are made to withstand. It could mean you’re having to replace your dental restorations more often than normal. 

Sore Jaws or Headaches

Muscle tension through your jaws and face can mean sore muscles or headaches when you wake up, or later throughout the day.

Wearing a protective splint or guard is a great way to protect your smile from bruxism. Get one from your dentist today!

Posted on behalf of:
Gainesville Dental Group
1026 Thompson Bridge Rd
Gainesville, GA 30501
(770) 297-0401

Most Popular

Tori, Exostosis, and Extra Bone Formation in the Mouth

A fairly common occurrence in the mouth is the existence of extra bone development along the outside or inside of the jawline near the teeth, or in the roof of…

Lingual Frenectomy versus Lingual Frenuloplasty

Lingual frenectomy and lingual frenuloplasty are both dental procedures used to correct a condition called ankyloglossia. Ankylogloassia, more commonly known as ‘tied tongue’, is an abnormality of the lingual frenulum….

Difference Between Conscious and Unconscious Sedation

Sedation dentistry is a wonderful option for many people who would not or cannot tolerate dentistry in a traditional dental setting.   Many people have a fear of visiting the dentist,…