Dental Tips Blog

Aug
10

How Teeth Grinding Affects Dental Crowns

Are you aware of having a habit of grinding your teeth? Perhaps you have what is known as bruxism: an unconscious habit of grinding and clenching your jaws together. This most commonly happens while you’re sleeping.

Bruxism can cause a lot of problems – such as gum recession, wear on your teeth, and stress to your TMJ. If you have a dental crown or are planning to have one placed sometime soon, then you should know that a teeth grinding habit also poses a risk to your valuable dental restorations.

The Danger to Crowns

Your teeth take a lot of wear! Everyday forces help you to chew food thoroughly, but when it’s applied against your teeth for an extended length of time on a regular basis, this will cause problems. Dental crowns will also feel the crunch!

Crowns could potentially be loosened over time. They also face the threat of fracturing altogether. Not only this, but one crowned tooth can damage the uncrowned tooth right above it.

Stronger Restorations

One solution is to update existing porcelain crowns with even stronger bruxism-resistant materials. It’s also a good idea to protect teeth with extensive enamel wear by crowning opposing teeth. That way, crown meets crown when your teeth come together.

Protect Your Restorations

If you have a problem with bruxism, then a custom-made mouth guard may be in order. A guard will keep your teeth from totally closing together while you sleep. This way, your teeth will be spared all that extra force you put on them. A guard is the best way you can protect your existing dental restorations. At your next dental appointment, ask your dentist to check for signs to find out if you could be grinding your teeth.

Posted on behalf of:
Mitzi Morris, DMD, PC
1295 Hembree Rd B202
Roswell, GA 30076
(770) 475-6767

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