Dental Tips Blog

Apr
17

Four Signs You’re Losing Your Enamel

Posted in Mouth Guards

Enamel erosion is an ongoing and insidious process. It’s downright deadly to teeth if you don’t stop it in time.

What is enamel erosion? It’s physical wear to the outer layer of your tooth structure. This process commonly happens as a result of acid exposure, but it can also be due to mechanical causes, such as bruxism or brushing too aggressively. If you’re alert to the following signs, you can take action before it’s too late.

  1. Teeth Look Brittle

Enamel is clear, but it looks pretty white against the dark yellow part of your tooth’s dentin layer. If the enamel starts to thin out, the layers on the edge of your tooth that don’t have dentin under them will look thin and glassy. Your teeth might look like they’d chip very easily.

  1. Smile Getting Yellow

When you lose enamel, that yellow dentin shows through a lot more. Our enamel wears down with age. As our teeth get older, they tend to look darker than years past.

  1. Flatter Teeth

A teeth grinding and clenching habit will quickly shave off lots of enamel. Your teeth might look flat, stubby, or square if you’re subconsciously chewing off your own enamel.  A custom dental nightguard can protect your tooth enamel from further damage.

  1. Increased Sensitivity

Your enamel helps to insulate the nerves in your teeth from changes in temperature and acidity. As enamel wears away, the nerves become more exposed to things that bother them. If your smile is getting unusually more sensitive, it could be a sign that your teeth are in jeopardy.

Have you noticed any of the signs described above? Contact your dentist right away to find out how to save your smile.

Posted on behalf of:
Springhurst Hills Dentistry
10494 Westport Rd Suite 107
Louisville, KY 40241
(502) 791-8358

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