Dental Tips Blog

Mar
6

Why a Dental Implant Isn’t a Good Idea for Your Child

Posted in Dental Implants

You wouldn’t be the first parent to ask if it’s okay for kids to get dental implants.

An implant is often ideal for filling in smile gaps. If your child has a permanently damaged or knocked-out adult tooth, then a dental implant can seem like the perfect remedy.

But your dentist may suggest otherwise.

A few reasons include:

  • Implants take a lot of time to heal
  • Kids aren’t always compliant with basic oral hygiene, so they may have a harder time keeping an implant healthy
  • Implant placement can be an intense procedure for a child

Most importantly, however, your child’s developing mouth is just too dynamic for an implant.

Even after adult teeth come in your child’s mouth keeps growing. The jawbone gets larger to make more space for incoming molars. This growth action is not the best environment for an implant to heal into.

Implants need solid bone to fit securely. But if that bone is steadily expanding over the months of healing, the implant won’t find a secure hold.

It would end up being a waste of money to put an implant in your child’s smile. Worse still, you could put your son or daughter through unnecessary discomfort.

So what can you do when your child loses a permanent tooth?

Happily, an implant could still be an option . . . down the road. Once physical growth in the jaw stops, you and your child can discuss together the pros and cons of getting a dental implant.

In the meantime, ask your dentist about temporary tooth replacements for kids. A removable bridge, flipper, or space maintainer is usually appropriate. Schedule a smile reconstruction consultation soon after your child loses an adult tooth.

Posted on behalf of:
Dream Dentist
1646 W U.S. 50
O’Fallon, IL 62269
(618) 726-2699

Mar
6

What Can I Eat After Having Oral Surgery?

Whether you have sutures in your gums or your wisdom teeth extracted, you may be experiencing a bit of mild discomfort. This can affect your ability to chew as well as your appetite. What can you eat for the next few days after oral surgery?

Use the following suggestions to plan your meals for the week after your next oral surgical procedure:

Oatmeal or Cream of Wheat

Want to start off your day with something substantial? Warm cereal is a good way to go.

Soup

Warm soup is a comforting way to get your body the nutrients it needs. Just don’t eat it while it’s too hot. That definitely won’t feel good if you accidentally burn yourself.

Macaroni and Cheese

You don’t want your pasta al dente for this dish! Make sure the noodles are cooked until very soft and that there’s enough cheese sauce to make them easy to swallow. This is another great option for getting protein and a full belly with minimal chewing.

Mashed Potatoes

Whether you go for sweet or regular potatoes, mashing them is a good way to get fiber. Use an electric mixer to ensure that the potatoes don’t have any chunks that need chewing.

Dessert

Yes, your dentist approves sweets in this case! Cool, soft, and easy-to-swallow desserts are a good way to soothe sore gums and give your jaw a break. They can even boost your morale. Choose from soft-serve ice cream, pudding, and Jell-O.

The key is to avoid foods that require a lot of chewing. Anything you can gently sip from a glass or spoon is fair game! Talk with your dentist for more ideas on safe foods during recovery from oral surgery.

Posted on behalf of:
Dental Care of Acworth
5552 Robin Road Suite A
Acworth GA 30103
678-888-1554

Mar
6

Think Your Dental Crown is Too Big? What You Can Do

Posted in Crowns

Your dentist will always check the fit of a crown before cementing it in place. Take this opportunity to let him or her know whether you feel the cap looks too big.

You’d quickly notice whether a front tooth with a crown looks bigger than the rest.

But it can take a while for you to realize that a back tooth crown feels larger than it should. Once the anesthetic and sensitivity wear off, your crown may become more noticeable.

Why It Happens

Sometimes, it has to do with the way the crown was placed. If the cap isn’t properly positioned on the tooth, it can feel higher than the other teeth. You might sense that the capped tooth is the first one that you bite down on.

Alternatively, the crown itself may have a ridge or peak on the chewing surface that’s too high.

Why It’s Bad

You’ll be able to tell if something doesn’t fit right. In fact, your tongue may get tired from feeling it all day.

But it’s also bad news for your teeth. A poorly-fitted crown can wear down the opposing tooth it bites against. It can also stress the core and root of the tooth it’s covering. An uneven bite can tax your jaw, causing TMJ issues.

What to Do

Go see your dentist for an adjustment. If the crown is really off, then he or she may be able to reposition it.

The most common fix, however, is simply polishing down the high points on the crown. The dentist will use a special drill piece to remove areas that feel too big when you bite down.

Better yet, see a dentist who works closely with their lab and uses careful tools to assess the fit of your crown from the very get go!

Posted on behalf of:
Dental Care Center At Kennestone
129 Marble Mill Rd NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 424-4565

Mar
6

How Immediate Are Immediate Dentures?

Posted in Dentures

What’s the appeal of immediate dentures? They mean you don’t have to go without teeth while you transition to your first denture. You get your existing teeth extracted and a new denture delivered on the very same visit.

So, yes, an immediate denture is just that. But the process takes much more than a day.

How It Works

You’ll go through a series of appointments to get your mouth ready for the procedure. The dentist will spend some time planning and designing your denture so that it will be ready to go. It’s also recommended on occasion to have some back teeth extracted early on.

The day you get your denture you’ll have the last teeth removed. Your new denture will go in and help your gums heal. You can go home with your completed smile, but the journey doesn’t end there.

A follow-up appointment within 24-48 hours is necessary to ensure everything is healing properly. As your gums heal, your denture will eventually need some adjustments.

As with any denture, getting used to your new prosthesis will take time and practice.

Is An Immediate Denture Right For You?

Getting a new smile in a day sounds great. But before you go for an immediate denture, think about these considerations:

  • It can be more expensive than a traditional denture
  • You may need to have a second denture made later on
  • Pre-existing health conditions could make it inadvisable for you to get an immediate denture

Discuss your options with your dentist before choosing an immediate denture. With a little careful planning, you can be sure of getting a smile you’ll love!

Posted on behalf of:
Georgia Denture and Implant Specialists
203 Woodpark Pl #102
Woodstock, GA 30188
(770) 926-0021

Mar
6

Get Your Dental Anxiety Under Control For Good!

Dental anxiety can be crippling. At the least, it makes every trip to the dentist’s a stressful endeavor. At its worst, it prevents people from getting needed dental care.

Do you suffer from fear of the dentist? These tips can help you get a handle on your emotions when it comes to dental treatment.

Talk it out with someone who cares.

Try discussing your anxiety with a doctor, therapist, or close friend. Even better, try talking with someone you trust who has knowledge of the dental field. Giving voice to your anxiety can prepare you to tackle it.

An empathetic dentist would be willing to meet with you away from a dental chair to sit down and calmly discuss your concerns.

Ask for sedation

Almost all dental offices have techniques for reducing anxiety. But there are likely some near you that specialize in treating folks with extreme dental fear. Those clinics will be equipped with safe dental sedation that can work wonders – you could end up dozing your way through nerve-wracking nervousness!

Create positive memories.

Most dental fears are embedded in a bad experience. No matter what happened in the past, it’s difficult to erase the negative emotions.

Fight back by creating and dwelling on positive dental experiences. One nice visit to the dentist’s makes it easier to schedule another, then another, and so on.

Start small by scheduling a simple dental examination. If you do need treatment, break it up over multiple visits so that you can gradually build up your courage.

With a little help and honest self-examination, you’ll find that it’s easy to get a handle on dental anxiety. Get more tips by calling a dental office near you.

Posted on behalf of:
Crabapple Dental
12670 Crabapple Rd #110
Alpharetta, GA 30004
(678) 319-0123

Mar
6

Get Rid of Gingivitis At Home with These 4 Easy Steps

Posted in Gum Disease

Gingivitis is inflammation of your gums. It’s a very common condition affecting people of all ages. If you’re dealing with it now, then you want to know how to get rid of it before it turns into something worse.

Fortunately, you can take measures here and now to start reducing the inflammation.

  1. Change Your Brush

It’s as simple as getting a more effective toothbrush. Look for one with soft bristles and a head that’s small enough to access all of your teeth. Many people with gingivitis like a powered brush because it’s good at removing the bacterial plaque that causes inflammation.

  1. Floss Daily

Flossing is good for preventing cavities. But it’s also essential for removing the plaque in between teeth that trigger gum inflammation. Flossing every day should eventually help your gums to bleed less.

  1. Antimicrobial Rinse

Look for an ADA-approved mouthwash that claims to kill bacteria. When used along with brushing and flossing, a rinse can prevent plaque buildup from recurring for long periods throughout the day.

  1. Vitamin C

Your gums can benefit a lot from just a little extra vitamin C in your diet. A strong immune system empowers your gums to fight off bacterial infections. Get lots of this water-soluble vitamin in strawberries, oranges, red peppers, kale, and other vegetables.

Fighting gingivitis is important because it can advance to periodontitis, a more serious form of gum disease. Periodontitis attacks the bone and ligaments that keep your teeth in place. It can also increase your risk of developing other health problems.

After doing what you can at home, make sure to schedule a checkup with your local dentist. Professional dental cleanings will help you maintain the best gum health possible.

Posted on behalf of:
Buford Family Dental
4700 Nelson Grogdon Blvd. NE #210
Buford, GA 30518
678.730.2005

Mar
6

Can Crooked Teeth Cause TMJ Disorder?

Posted in TMJ Therpy

Your TMJ (temporomandibular joint) is the hinge-like joint that is your jaw. When that joint malfunctions or gets inflamed, the condition is called TMJD, TMD, or temporomandibular joint disorder.

Is there any connection between having crooked teeth and developing a painful jaw dysfunction?

Tooth Alignment Matters

Tooth alignment involves more than looks alone. The positioning of your teeth impacts the health of your entire mouth.

For example, cavity-causing bacteria can hide out in the tight spaces between overlapping teeth.

But the problems don’t stop there.

“Natural” tooth alignment isn’t something an orthodontist just made up. When teeth come in nice and straight, this allows them to equally interact in the chewing process. Straight teeth improve the function and balance of your bite.

How is Your TMJ Involved?

If crooked teeth are experiencing uneven pressure during biting and chewing, then this means that the joint moving those teeth is also affected.

Sometimes, a tooth out of alignment may meet the opposing teeth sooner than its neighbors. This can mean that the jaw is closing sooner on one side than on the other.

To illustrate, imagine what it would feel like to chew on just one side of your mouth all the time.

That’s what can happen to your jaw if crooked teeth are throwing your bite out of balance. One side gets worked harder than the other. Over time, the stress can lead to major problems.

What should you do?

If you suspect that you have any symptoms of TMD like pain, stiffness, or limited jaw opening, contact your dentist. Find out how your bite may be affecting your TMJ. Your dentist or orthodontist can use braces to correct bite problems that cause or aggravate TMD.  Orthodontic treatment could be the ticket to a more comfortable smile.

Posted on behalf of:
Broad Street Braces
2010 South Juniper Street
Philadelphia, PA 19148
213-234-3030

Mar
6

6 Ways Dental Veneers Will Perfect Your Smile

Posted in Veneers

Celebrities, actors, and many others in the spotlight have gorgeous smiles. It’s not that they were born with teeth any better than ours – they’ve just had a lot of little imperfections covered up.

Often, this is all thanks to dental veneers.

Here’s how porcelain veneers could work wonders for you, as well:

  1. Close Gaps

By making the veneers just a little bigger than the teeth, your dentist can span a considerable gap between teeth.

This function of veneers makes them a potential alternative to braces.

  1. Whiten Teeth Instantly

Stubborn stain that won’t go away with bleaching can be masked over with a porcelain veneer.

  1. Cover Up Chipped Teeth

If you’re tired of a chip in your tooth making you look childish or unprofessional, then get it fixed with a veneer (which is less invasive than a crown.)

  1. Even Out Your Smile

Can’t shake the feeling that one tooth is just a tiny bit longer than the others?

A veneer can erase even the smallest irregularities and create a uniform smile line.

  1. Smooth Enamel

Rough tooth surfaces tend to trap a lot of stain. It goes without saying that your tongue can’t seem to stay away from the odd texture! You’ll feel a lot better about your smile with a smoother surface created by veneers.

  1. Hide Old Fillings

Sick of a patchwork of stained, old, tooth-colored fillings that show on your front teeth? Many times, restoring those teeth with dental crowns is the best option. But you never know; your dentist may find that the fillings are small enough to be covered over by veneers.

Schedule a smile consultation with your local dentist to find out whether veneers are right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Bayshore Dental Center
810 W Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd #2900
Seffner, FL 33584
(813) 330-2006

Mar
6

4 Reasons to Schedule that Dental Check Up Right Now

It’s time to stop putting it off. Here are four reasons to pick up the phone in the next five minutes and call your dentist for a visit.

  1. You Have the Time.

Given the choice, which would you prefer?

A.) Have a routine dental cleaning and checkup at your convenience

B.) Use up a sick day at work to call in for an emergency root canal

Surprisingly, most people somehow make time for option B.

It’s simple, really. Get it over with so that you can stay more in control of your life.

  1. Your Health Depends on It.

Many a routine dental visit has revealed health problems patients never knew they had. Your mouth is connected to the rest of your body. Dentists know what is and isn’t normal in the oral environment. A simple dental examination could uncover early signs that you should see your doctor.

  1. You Can Take Advantage of Your Insurance Benefits.

Insurance benefits usually reset at the start of the new year. If you have a dental checkup now, you can get a good idea of what your oral health priorities are. Your dentist will help you create a to-do list that suits your schedule and budget and lets you strategically maximize your benefits right through the end of December.

  1. You Just Never Know What’s Lurking Beneath the Surface.

A lot of dental issues can be kept manageable (and affordable) just by catching them early enough. Routine x-rays, examinations, screenings, and preventative treatments will keep you on top of your oral health and minimize any unpleasant surprises.

So what are you waiting for? Contact a dental office near you today.

Posted on behalf of:
Wayne G. Suway, DDS, MAGD
1820 The Exchange SE #600
Atlanta, GA 30339
(770) 953-1752

Mar
6

3 Surprising Causes Behind a Toothache

There are no signs of a cavity or infection, so why does your tooth suddenly hurt?

Here are a few reasons for a toothache that most people don’t suspect, at first.

  1. Sinus Problems

Is it an upper molar that’s killing you?

Upper tooth roots can sometimes extend close to the sinuses. If you’re familiar with sinus infections, then you know just how miserable that pressure can make you!

That very same pressure caused by infected sinuses can press on the tooth roots. Voila! Instant toothache.

  1. That Time Your Mouth Got Hit . . . A Long Time Ago!

You were just playing with your kids. You ran into the side of an open door.

Whatever the cause, it’s easy to take an accidental whack to the mouth. Your tooth may hurt for a couple hours, but then it’s fine and you move on.

But the tooth that was “fine” can flare up with pain when you least expect it. If you have an unexpected toothache, it could be a fracture or nerve damage dating back to an event you nearly forgot about more than a decade prior.

  1. Gum Recession

Gums can start to pull away from teeth for a number of reasons:

  • Age
  • Gum disease
  • Aggressive tooth brushing
  • Braces
  • Poor tooth alignment

When they do, they expose the sensitive dentin on the tooth root. This can give your teeth a sharp shock in temperature changes.

Although sensitive teeth don’t seem as serious as a cavity, you should still see your dentist. Exposed tooth roots are quick to develop decay.

Is a toothache ruining your life?

Get relief by discovering the cause of your dental pain. Contact your dentist to schedule a visit.

Posted on behalf of:
Springfield Lorton Dental Group
5419-C Backlick Rd
Springfield, VA 22151
(703) 256-8554

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