Dental Tips Blog

Sep
29

When Will My Child’s Teeth Fall Out?

Like many other processes in a growing body, teeth fall out on their very own schedule. Kids are often unique in terms of smile development. By understanding a few keystone principles, you’ll know when your son or daughter’s teeth are ready “exfoliate.”

Follow The Leader

Baby teeth tend to fall out in the same order as they one they came in at. For most kids, this usually means that their central bottom front teeth will be the first to get loose. Soon to follow are the upper front teeth, and so on.

When the adult teeth start developing within the bone, they’ll push on the baby tooth roots, triggering them to dissolve. Once the roots are gone, the tooth will loose to make way for the emerging replacement.

Other Factors

Do you have a little girl or boy? That can make a difference. Biologically, females tend to develop a bit faster than males.

If your child naturally loses their first tooth by age 4, that’s not necessarily a cause for concern. Neither is it worrisome if your kid is 8 and hasn’t yet lost any teeth.

What You Should Know

Never force a tooth to come out before it’s ready. Pulling it too soon can result in pain and even an infection. Encourage your child to gently wiggle a loose tooth with their finger or tongue until the tooth is ready to come out. Nature will take its course!

If a baby tooth is lost too soon because of decay or injury or you’re worried about late development, bring your child to your family dentist for an exam.

Posted on behalf of:
Moores Chapel Dentistry
9115 Samlen Lane #105
Charlotte, NC 28214
(704) 389-9299

Sep
29

Will Crooked Teeth Straighten Out on Their Own?

Posted in Braces

The short answer is no, but of course there’s always more to it!

Teeth naturally move forward in the mouth. Whether they’re crowded because of a lack of space or because of wisdom teeth budging in, there is nowhere else for them to go. Teeth don’t move backwards.

Kids And Crooked Teeth

Some crowding is normal in little kids’ mouths. It’s typical for teeth to get all jumbled, sometimes doubling up like “shark teeth” when there’s a mix of adult and baby teeth. In this situation, you might expect the tooth alignment to calm down as your child gets older.

Even still, it’s important to monitor tooth development for any signs that there’s something worse going on. Most dentists recommend that children see an orthodontist by age 7. A specialist can look at your child’s mouth to assess their tooth alignment.

If treatment is indicated, early intervention can limit the amount of time your child would have to spend in braces.

What If You’re An Adult?

The good news is that if your teeth and jaws are done growing, your teeth like to stay where they are (as long as you don’t have extra open spaces, such as those caused by an extraction.) But if a certain habit or anatomical feature is putting constant pressure on your teeth, then the situation will likely only get worse with time.

In either case, the teeth won’t correct themselves. Even in adults, crooked teeth can lead to problems like:

  • Premature wear
  • Gum recession
  • TMJ strain
  • Headaches
  • Increased risk of decay and gum disease

It’s always worth it to get a little help in straightening out your smile! There several effective options for straightening adult teeth ranging from traditional wire braces to clear dental aligners. Talk with your dentist to find out which orthodontic options are right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Dona Prince, DDS
4220 Sergeant Rd #100
Sioux City, IA 51106
(712) 274-2228

Sep
29

Do These 5 Things to Quickly Recover from a Tooth Extraction

You might not look forward to having a wisdom tooth or other tooth extracted, but you’ll probably find that the experience is more comfortable than you might think. Here are a few tips to help you bounce right back after a tooth extraction.

  1. Stay Away From Straws

Suction of any kind will put tension on the blood clot forming at the extraction site. Disturbing that clot will only cause more bleeding and delay the healing process.

If your mouth is swollen and sore after oral surgery, it may be tempting to use a straw. But it’s better to just sip carefully.

  1. No Smoking!

Smoking is another activity that creates suction in the mouth. But not only that, it constricts blood vessels throughout the body which slows down the delivery of nutrients to your gums. Avoid smoking after any type of oral surgery.

  1. Eat Healthy

Vitamin C is essential to healing as is protein. Make sure you stick to very soft food for the first couple days, however. Enjoy minimal-chewing-required meals of:

  • Applesauce
  • Yogurt
  • Soup
  • Soft pasta
  • Pudding
  • Scrambled eggs
  1. Get Lots Of Rest

Strenuous physical activity that gets the heart pumping raises blood pressure. That will only put more tension on the healing site and disrupt the blood clot. Take a break from hard work and physical exercise for a couple days.

  1. Put Off Brushing

Yes, you get to skip tooth brushing immediately after your surgery. On the following day, you can start gently brushing your other teeth. Just make sure to avoid the extraction site. Also, don’t swish your mouth with water or mouthwash too vigorously, since that can disrupt healing.

Follow your dentist’s other instructions for a fast and successful recovery!

Posted on behalf of:
Gastonia Family Dentistry
2557 Pembroke Rd
Gastonia, NC 28054
(704) 854-8887

Sep
29

Will I Need a Root Canal if I Have My Crown Re-done?

Posted in Root Canals

Maybe your dentist suggested that you update your crown. Or, perhaps you want to change it out because you’re unhappy with the look.

Dental crowns are wonderful things. They protect a tooth from all angles and restore its strength that may have been lost to decay or a fracture. But anytime a tooth is capped, it loses a bit of its structure. That’s just the way it is in order to properly fit a crown.

Whenever an old crown is replaced, there is a small chance that the tooth may need root canal (endodontic therapy). Root canals are separate (though often related) procedures in relation to crowns. You need a crown after getting a root canal, but you don’t always need endodontic therapy when getting a dental crown.

A root canal is a procedure in which your dentist removes the nerve from inside the roots of your tooth. Root canals sound scary, but they aren’t that bad. If anything, they usually bring relief to a tooth in pain.

There are three main reasons you may need root canal treatment after having an old crown removed:

  1. There is advanced decay infecting the tooth under the crown
  2. The tooth’s nerve chamber is breached during the process of getting a new crown
  3. There is so little tooth structure left that breaching the nerve chamber is virtually inevitable

If any of those situations apply to you, there’s little you can do to anticipate it. You’ll have to visit your dentist for x-rays and an exam to see how your current crown is holding up.

Posted on behalf of:
Memorial Park Dental Spa
6010 Washington Ave Suite D
Houston, TX 77007
(713) 336-8478

Sep
29

What Are Permanent Dentures? Are They Right for You?

Posted in Dentures

“Permanent dentures” is not a real thing in dentistry. Most people Googling the term are just searching for a tooth replacement option that they don’t have to worry about falling out. A set-it-and-forget-it kind of deal.

If you’re looking for something a little more secure than traditional dentures, then you may be interested in either:

An implant supported overdenture

–or–

A fixed hybrid denture/extended bridge

Overdentures And Fixed Bridges – What’s The Difference?

Both of these options use dental implants for support. Both can replace a full arch of teeth.

But the main difference is that an overdenture is basically a regular denture with attachments that snap onto implants while the fixed hybrid/extended bridge is far more conservative and you can’t remove it.

Implant overdentures are usually made of acrylic. They have wide borders that provide more facial support and cover the gums. An upper overdenture will cover the palate. If you had one of these, you would still have to take it out at night and clean it daily, like any other denture.

Fixed implant bridges or hybrid dentures are made from metal and porcelain and may not cover the gums. They are screwed in place by your dentist and are only removed by your dentist for maintenance. You continue to brush just as if you had natural teeth.

Why Go Permanent?

Either of these options will keep your teeth from putting pressure on your gums. The implants will actually help to preserve the shape of the bone you have left. Both will give you a secure bite.

To find out whether these more “permanent” denture solutions are right for your smile, plan a visit to your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Marvin Village Dentistry
8161 Ardrey Kell Road
Suite 101
Charlotte, NC 28277
(704) 579-5513

Sep
29

4 Uses for Old Toothbrushes

Posted in Fillings

Regular brushing with a fresh toothbrush is part of a good oral hygiene routine that will help prevent tooth decay and reduce the need for dental fillings, crowns, and other tooth restorations. Most dentists recommend replacing your toothbrush every three to four months or sooner if the bristles have become frayed or if you have been sick.   Before you throw that old toothbrush away, why don’t you see if you can put your brush to use in one of these areas?

  1. Scrubbing Tile Grout

There’s nothing like a toothbrush to loosen grime trapped between tiles or even around the sink faucet. It’s especially effective when used with a cleaning solution of baking soda and vinegar.

  1. Cleaning Jewelry

Toothbrush bristles are the ideal way to add some shine to your jewelry. Their small size makes them perfect for scrubbing the hard-to-reach inside of rings where dirt can accumulate. Use a jewelry cleaning chemical to treat your favorite treasures and then loosen debris with your old brush.

  1. Pre-Treating Stains On Clothes

Need a way to dab just a little pre-treat laundry soap on your favorite blouse? Your old toothbrush makes the perfect applicator. It’s also good for scrubbing out isolated stains.

  1. Unclogging Filters

Lots of household appliances come with filters that you probably overlook more often than not. A good cleaning will keep your refrigerator or clothes dryer running smoothly. A toothbrush can not only nab gunk stuck in the screen of the filter, but it’s perfect for reaching the angles at the corners of the filter.

Naturally, you can’t retire your toothbrush without having another at the ready to take its place. Use this opportunity to find a brush you’ll love even more. Schedule a dental appointment and ask your dentist for some tips on selecting a new toothbrush that suits your smile care needs.

Posted on behalf of:
The Newport Beach Dentist
1901 Westcliff Drive #6
Newport Beach, CA 92660
(949) 646-2481

Sep
29

How Long Does Dental Sedation Last?

Are you curious how long dental sedation will “knock you out?” For starters, which kind of dental sedation do you plan on having? The human body responds differently to each kind.

Nitrous Oxide

Better known as laughing gas, nitrogen is administered via a hose that you breathe in from. It’s mixed with oxygen and delivered slowly until it achieves the optimum effect on you. Then, trained dental staff closely monitor you and maintain that level of comfort with the inhaled gas.

As soon as your treatment is done, the dentist or assistant will switch you back to oxygen until the gas mixture has left your system. Within a matter of minutes, you’re back to normal.

Oral Sedation

Some dental offices will give you a medication to take about an hour before treatment. That’s how long it takes for the sedative to kick in. The drug will stay in your system for nearly 24 hours, but it is only fully effective for about two to four hours until it starts wearing off.

Even if you feel back to your usual self soon after your dental sedation appointment, it’s still advised to avoid driving for the rest of the day.

IV Sedation

Much like nitrous oxide, IV-administered sedation is kept at a constant level for as long as treatment lasts. This kind is best for lengthy procedures since it can be delivered continuously without worry of it wearing off. Once your treatment is done, the IV is stopped.

The effects of IV sedation begin to fade almost immediately, but you will feel woozy for some time. You should have a companion escort you home after treatment and keep an eye on you for some time.

Ask your dentist which dental sedation method is best for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Dental Care Center At Kennestone
129 Marble Mill Rd NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 424-4565

Sep
29

Play It Safe With A Customized Mouthguard

Posted in Mouth Guards

Do you have a sports enthusiast in the family? When you’re suiting up to hit the court or the field, protective equipment is a must. It might surprise you, but adequate dental protection is often overlooked – and it’s just as important. How? An athletic mouthguard can…

  • Prevent tooth loss, damage or dislocation
  • Act as a protective buffer for the gum, lips and tongue
  • Minimize your risk of concussion

… and it’s much cheaper than a dental emergency!

You Get What You Pay For

While an over-the-counter athletic guard may seem like an economical and convenient alternative, it’s not. You’re unique, and so is your smile. A “one size fits all” appliance, and even popular “boil and bite” options, are bulky and fit poorly. When it comes to athletic mouthguards, a snug, precise fit is important to best protect the teeth in case of injury.

You don’t want a guard that slips down on the job or is so uncomfortable that it distracts you from your game. Not only that, poor fit can interfere with talking and breathing – and nobody wants that in the middle of the game. It can even get knocked out, exposing you to a secondary injury.

It might surprise you to find that a customized athletic mouthguard can improve your game. Often times, our patients gain a boost of confidence, knowing that their smile is protected. After all, having a worry-free smile allows you to put your mind on what’s important – playing harder!

Stay In The Game 

Don’t take an unintended timeout for an unexpected broken tooth. Call your dentist today and ask about protecting your smile with a customized athletic mouthguard!

Posted on behalf of:
Buford Family Dental
4700 Nelson Grogdon Blvd. NE #210
Buford, GA 30518
678.730.2005

Sep
29

I Lost My Tooth Years Ago – Can I Still Get an Implant?

Posted in Dental Implants

Although you’ve known about dental implants for years, you’re only just now starting to consider the option.

Is it too late for you to fill the gap in your smile with an implant?

How much time goes by between losing a tooth and getting an implant isn’t that important. There’s no time limit, no set figure. What does matter is the condition your mouth is in.

How Are Your Bone Levels?

Bone responds to the presence of tooth roots. If there is no tooth in an area, then the bone tissue has nothing to stimulate its rebuilding process. Over time, it shrinks and becomes too shallow to retain an implant.

Even if you have too little bone, implant therapy could still be an option. Smaller implants, bone grafting, and careful planning have made implants a success for many a patient with poor bone levels.

Is There A Tooth In The Way?

You might have a gap in your smile, but it’s possible that neighboring teeth have shifted forward or tipped out of line. This would block the space for an implant to fit into. To make room, you may need orthodontic treatment for a short period of time to open the space back up before you can have an implant placed there.

After Years With Dentures

If you’re just now considering implants after wearing dentures for some time, that’s okay. Your dentist can help you work with what you have to place implants that will anchor your denture for a secure bite.

Contact your dentist to schedule an evaluation and see if dental implants are right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Paul Jang Dentistry
14711 Princeton Avenue, Ste. 12
Moorpark, CA 93021
805-791-2336

Sep
29

10 Ways to Avoid Getting a Cavity

Posted in Fillings

If your history is marked with more dental procedures than any other memory, then it’s a great idea to take steps that lower your cavity risk! Here are ten tips to help prevent tooth decay and avoid the need for fillings, crowns and other tooth restorations

Cut out sweet drinks. Sipping on sugary coffee, soda, or juice on a daily basis is basically soaking your teeth in enamel-eating acids.

Keep your mouth hydrated. A dry mouth is a playground for cavity-causing bacteria. Drink lots of water and chew sugarless gum to keep your saliva flow going strong.

Switch to whole grains. Simple sugars are the main fuel for enamel-eroding bacteria. High-fiber foods and complex carbs are good for your body in general and don’t stick around in the mouth to create sticky plaque.

Eat fresh, whole food snacks. Opt for fresh veggies and fibrous fruits like apples over chips and cookies. These will help to naturally cleanse your mouth.

Fluoride, fluoride, fluoride. Need we say more? Use a rinse daily and take advantage of any professional fluoride treatments your office provides.

Brush/floss even more. No matter how often you brush or floss, try to do it a little more frequently.

Get sealants. They’re not just for kids! Dental sealants prevent decay from starting in the grooves on molars.

Eat dairy. Cheese and milk neutralize acids in the mouth and fortify teeth against decay.

Rinse often. Don’t take any chances – rinse your mouth with water after every meal or snack.

See your dentist regularly. Never skip an appointment. Regular exams and yearly x-rays are key to detecting the signs of decay and stopping it before it can cause too much trouble.

Posted on behalf of:
Garrisonville Dental
481 Garrisonville Rd. #105
Stafford, VA 22554
540-318-1794

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