Dental Tips Blog

May
25

6 Signs You Should Pick a Denture Alternative

Posted in Dentures

Are you ready to upgrade your denture? These six signs may say yes.

  1. Sore Spots

An ill-fitting denture can be more trouble to wear than it’s worth. If you have a hard time getting any denture to fit no matter how much you adjust it, then it could be time to consider an implant-supported option.

  1. Difficulty Chewing

Dentures do take some time to get used to. With practice, you can handle almost any food. But they’ll never compare to the security of an implant-anchored option. Dental implants won’t go anywhere so they’ll help keep your denture in place when you eat.

  1. Too Embarrassed to Laugh

No one should ever be too ashamed of their smile to show it off in laughter! If insecurity over your grin has turned your mood sour, then it’s definitely time to think about why you deserve a more confident smile restoration.

  1. Constantly Misplacing Your Denture

Most implant-secured teeth are not removable. You brush them just as you would regular teeth. This non-removable option is ideal if you have a habit of always losing your current ones.

  1. You Don’t Want Others to Know You Have a Denture

Even young people may lose all of their teeth. This can make it very difficult for them to have a busy social life. Implant-anchored teeth can let you live your life worry-free.

  1. Jawbone is Shrinking

If your denture is getting looser, that means your jaw has shrunk a bit. Implant therapy will help to strengthen your bone and prevent future wear.

Is implant therapy the right option for you? Ask your dentist for an opinion tailored to your needs.

Posted on behalf of:
Gwinnett Family Dental Care
3455 Lawrenceville Hwy
Lawrenceville, GA 30044
(770) 921-1115

May
25

Get a Whiter Smile at Home in 4 Steps

Posted in Teeth Whitening

Who doesn’t want a brighter, healthier-looking smile?

Better yet would be to get this gorgeous new look from the comfort of your own home. Here are a few tips to get you started.

  1. Cut Out Staining Foods

The first step is to stop soaking your teeth in the stuff that will only layer on more stain. Some popular foods and drinks that stain teeth include:

– Coffee

– Tea

– Soda

– Sports drinks

– Red wine

– Curry

– Tomato sauces

You don’t have to give up these foods forever – just cut back a bit and reach for lighter-colored options.

  1. Try a Whitening Toothpaste

Teeth-whitening toothpastes don’t actually bleach your teeth. They do contain small abrasive particles which can help to scrub away some surface stain. One common ingredient is baking soda. Whether you choose a toothpaste or just use baking soda by itself, proceed with caution – it can irritate gum tissue.

  1. Home Bleaching Trays

Most dental offices can provide their patients with a custom-fitted teeth whitening tray. You take this tray home along with some professional-strength whitening gel. By wearing the tray with the gel for an hour or so each day (depending on the strength of the formula), you’ll gradually whiten your smile until you reach the shade you’re happy with.

  1. Maintain the Shine with a Rinse

Once you’ve gotten that beautiful white smile, you’ll want to keep it that way. Whitening rinses that contain small amounts of hydrogen peroxide will help keep new stain from settling into your enamel.

Want more tips on keeping your smile young and vibrant? Schedule a smile consultation with your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Red Oak Family Dentistry
5345 W University Dr #200
McKinney, TX 75071
(469) 209-4279

May
25

Am I Too Old for a Dental Implant?

Posted in Dental Implants

As long as you are healthy, there is no age limit for getting a dental implant.

Adult patients across a wide spectrum of ages have benefited from dental implants for years. The fact that you’re considering the possibility of implant therapy shows that it’s probably not too late for you.

Dental implants are one of the most predictably successful treatments out there. Even still, there are a few important considerations everyone needs to keep in mind before getting an implant.

Will Your Jaw Support an Implant?

Implants are metal screws that need plenty of bone to anchor into. After years of wearing a denture in your mouth, the bone under your gums will have shrunk a bit. You may need bone grafting to rebuild your jaw. A graft procedure means an extra investment of more surgery and recovery time.

Can You Care for Your Implant?

You need to be diligent about thoroughly cleaning your implant daily with a toothbrush and gentle floss. If you would have difficulty doing that, then a removable option that someone else can clean might be better for you.

Are You Ready to Invest Some Time and Risk?

Placing a dental implant in a healthy body is a very safe procedure. However, like any other surgery, there is always possibility something could go wrong. There is also the fact that implants take months to properly heal.

If you don’t want to put your body through all that at this point in your life, then your dentist will help you find another option. But if you’re interested in what an implant could do for you, bring the topic up for discussion with your family and local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Marbella Dentistry
791 FM 1103 #119
Cibolo, TX 78108
(210) 504-2655

May
25

How Much Time Do You Spend on Your Oral Hygiene Routine?

Good oral hygiene between routine dental exams and cleanings will help your teeth and gums stay healthy.  It’s actually not enough to just scrub a brush in some toothpaste bubbles for a few seconds. You need to invest a little more time in your routine to get the full benefit.

Is Your Brushing Worth Your Time?

Dentists generally agree that you should be brushing a solid two minutes to get any real benefit from the activity.

Dental plaque is made up of bacteria that coat themselves in a protective slime layer. This means that they can’t be killed off with toothpaste or mouthwash the way hand sanitizer kills germs on our hands.

It takes a little time to physically displace these germs which cause bad breath, gum disease, and cavities. A toothbrush is your best tool for removing the majority of bacteria.

When brushing, make sure you hit all the important areas:

  • Chewing surfaces
  • Inner gum line
  • Outer gum line
  • Backs of the last teeth in each arch

It takes a little time to make sure your brush is accessing all of these areas for a thorough plaque removal!

That’s Not All, Folks . . .

If your dentist recommends that you use a mouthwash, make sure you do that the right way, too. A strong fluoride rinse usually needs one minute to deliver the most benefit to your teeth. A lot of anti-plaque rinses require a solid 30-second swish.

Don’t forget the flossing! At least once a day make sure you run something between your teeth where a brush can’t reach. The time needed for this will vary from person-to-person, so check with your dentist about the routine that’s right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Pleasant Plains Dental
5850 W Hwy 74 #135
Indian Trail, NC 28079
(704) 815-5513

May
25

What’s the Point of a Temporary Filling?

Posted in Fillings

Temporary fillings will fall out or fall apart usually within a month of being placed. Why not just go straight for the real deal right then?

Why Get a Temporary Restoration

Temporary fillings are very common in emergency situations. It can take time to prepare your tooth to receive a permanent restoration. If you have to make a last-minute emergency trip to the dentist’s, chances are pretty good that your dentist will need to schedule you back to finish treatment. In the meantime, a temporary filling will keep your damaged tooth clean and protected.

You would also get a temporary filling after having a root canal to protect it until it’s ready for a dental crown.

It May Take More Than One Visit

Some dental procedures require more than one appointment to plan them out properly. If you wanted to get your tooth prepared for a gold filling, for example, you would need to wear a temporary for a little while. Such a restoration is also good for cases where the tooth’s pulp isn’t yet stable enough to be capped off.

Another benefit is that temporary filling material contains a substance called eugenol which smells and tastes like cloves. Eugenol is a natural anesthetic which can help soothe and numb a sore tooth.

Taking Care of Temporary Restorations

Even if your tooth feels just fine right now, don’t let that deceive you into thinking you don’t need to go back!

Meanwhile, keep brushing and flossing as you normally would, taking special care around the temporary filling. If your filling falls out, you can find a temporary cement at your local drugstore to tide you over until you can see your dentist again.

Posted on behalf of:
Springhurst Hills Dentistry
10494 Westport Rd Suite 107
Louisville, KY 40241
(502) 791-8358

May
25

Dental Sedation Could Eliminate Your Anxiety

How do you feel when you envision a trip to the dentist’s office?

Like many other people, you might break into a cold sweat and feel your stomach sink into your shoes. Dental fear is more common than you may realize. You might also be surprised to learn that it’s actually pretty easy to deal with.

Sleep Through Treatment

By taking an oral or IV-administered medication, you could doze your way through any dental procedure. Sedation at this level doesn’t render you completely unconscious – you’ll still be able to respond to directions and questions. But you won’t remember much or care about anything that’s going on at the time. It makes it easier to get numbing shots, too.

Who knows? After a few sessions with dental sedation, you could feel so confident about treatment that you’ll never need sedation again.

Take the First Step

Be assured that simply calling a dental office or walking in does not mean that you must sit in a dental chair and have treatment. It’s okay to just have a visit to get familiar with the place and get to know the team. You can have a perfectly relaxing meeting with the dentist to ask all your questions free from the pressure of being in the chair. You’ll learn about sedation options and other techniques for reducing anxiety.

Your dental team is on your side! They want to do everything possible to make you comfortable so that you can get the smile-saving treatment you deserve.

Take that first step by simply calling or emailing your local dental practice for more information.

Posted on behalf of:
Pacific Sky Dental
6433 Mission St
Daly City, CA 94014
(650) 353-3130

May
25

Are You Paying Too Much for Your Dental Crown?

Posted in Crowns

You were quite proud of your lovely new crown. . . until a friend from across the country told you they paid a fraction of what you did for their own restoration.

What’s going on here? Is this dental extortion?

There are a lot of different factors affecting the cost of a crown.

Geographic Location

Prices at a particular practice are set based on the needs of that office. In the local economy, dental materials, lab services, utilities, and rent could be very steep. That will affect how high the dentist has to price his or her dental crowns.

If you need to find something that suits your budget a little better, it doesn’t hurt to shop around at offices outside of where you live.

Location in Your Mouth

Did you need to cap a front tooth that shows when you smile? Was your crown restoring a back molar? Crowning a dental implant?

The kind of support your tooth needs determines which type of dental crown you need. There is no one-size-fits-all crown.

More Than a Crown

You’re not responsible for just the cost of the crown, alone. As with any other procedure, you’ll have the quoted price and then the total price which adds in all the lab fees, exam fees, diagnostic fees, and such.

How Much Should You Pay?

Fees without insurance vary widely, but rough averages for here in the United States when you’re paying out of pocket usually cost around the following amounts:

  • Porcelain – $1,400
  • Porcelain-fused-to-metal – $1,000
  • Metal – $1,300

Insurance benefits could help out a lot in defraying costs. Even if you don’t have insurance, ask your dental office about any savings options or provisions for financing your treatment.

Posted on behalf of:
Touchstone Dentistry
2441 FM 646 W Suite A
Dickinson, TX 77539
(832) 769-5202

May
25

How Much Do Invisible Braces Cost?

Posted in Braces

For decades, metal brackets and wires have been the most common and reliable method for straightening teeth.

Invisible Braces Options

First of all, what exactly are “invisible” braces?

As dentistry and orthodontics progress, there are more options out there for you to choose from. These include tooth-colored braces and clear aligner trays. The most popular aligner system is Invisalign.

How do these invisible braces compare with regular braces?

Invisalign

Invisalign aligners are clear trays that are custom-fitted to your teeth. Before getting your first tray, your dentist will take some records of your teeth and send these to an Invisalign lab which designs the trays.

You’ll notice that the tray is very snug because it’s designed to put slight pressure on the teeth you want to move. Over time, your bite will adjust to the fit of the tray and it’ll be time to get a new one.

Because of the special materials and diagnostics used in Invisalign, it tends to be a bit pricier than regular braces. You’ll probably find that the cost is worth the extra free time and comfort that Invisalign gives you.

Ceramic Braces

If your smile needs more help than what an aligner tray can provide, then clear braces are your next best option. These can cost a bit more than classic metal braces. This option is less visible because the brackets and wires are tooth colored with clear bands.

How much you’ll pay for invisible braces largely depends on the area you live in.  If you want to seek treatment that’s cheaper than what’s available locally, research orthodontia costs in other towns. Get started by contacting your dentist for more information.

Posted on behalf of:
Dr. Farhan Qureshi, DDS
5206 Dawes Ave
Alexandria, VA 22311
(703) 931-4544

May
25

Child-Friendly Toothbrushes

How do you make sure that your child has a healthy smile that will last them for years to come? One way is by getting them started off with the right kind of toothbrush.

Why Kids Don’t Like Brushing

Some children do just fine with remembering to brush their teeth. Or at least, they cooperate with mom or dad’s efforts to help. Others are more resistant because it makes them gag or simply because they’re bored.

It’s important to make kids feel comfortable and engaged in such an important activity as tooth-brushing.

Here’s are some things you can do to help:

Choose a Fun Toothbrush

Get your child involved in picking out a toothbrush he or she will actually use. Kids’ brushes come in a variety of colors and designs with familiar cartoon characters printed on them. Some have lights, songs, and other bells and whistles that make brushing a fun job.

Switch Out the Brush Regularly

For a healthy smile and body, your child needs a new toothbrush every few months. Old brushes harbor germs from previous infections. They might even pick up some icky debris from the bathroom. Pick out a new toothbrush at each dental visit. Or as mentioned before, bring your kid along to help shop for a new one.

Go for the Small Brush Head

When it comes to kids’ mouths, the smaller the toothbrush head, the better. This will make it easier to maneuver around all those tiny teeth for maximum plaque-removal with minimal gagging.

For more tips on safe and effective brushing, talk with your children’s dentist or dental hygienist. They can show you a few tricks to mage age-appropriate brushing easier than ever.

Posted on behalf of:
Spanaway Family Dentistry
20709 Mountain Hwy E #101
Spanaway, WA 98387
(253) 948-0880

May
25

How Braces Affect Your Gums: The Good and the Bad

Posted in Braces

What should you do to keep your gums healthy while wearing braces?

Brush, Brush, Brush!

Your dentist and orthodontist can’t stress enough how important it is to brush your teeth frequently! Brackets are quick to collect plaque and food debris. You need to brush from all angles to make sure your orthodontia stays bacteria-free.

Some patients love to use a powered toothbrush or water flosser to blast away gum-irritating debris. It’s recommended to brush after each meal when wearing braces.

If you don’t brush (and floss and rinse) properly with braces, your gums will quickly react. All that gunk will cause them to get puffy and red. You might notice your gums swelling to the point that they start growing over the brackets. That’s a sign you need a dental checkup.

Braces and Gum Recession

Yes, braces have been known to cause a little gum recession, in some areas. It could be the result of tension on the teeth as they move into proper position. Or it could be your gums’ response to the presence of a bracket and dental plaque.

Your dentist or orthodontist can help you fight and slow down gum recession by giving you some helpful tips.

How Braces Help Your Gums

Crooked teeth are notorious for trapping gum disease-causing germs. It’s very hard to properly clean out those areas between overlapping teeth. By straightening out your teeth, you make it easier to remove plaque and tartar buildup. This reduces your chances for developing periodontitis, a serious form of gum disease that results in tooth loss.

How are your gums handling braces? Visit your local dentist for a gum evaluation.

Posted on behalf of:
East Cobb Orthodontics
2810 Lassiter Rd
Marietta, GA 30062
(770) 993-7118

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