Dental Tips Blog

Oct
16

What Makes My Teeth So Sensitive?

Posted in Root Canals

Dental hypersensitivity can have a number of causes. A combination of factors, in some cases. To figure out what’s going on with your teeth, it helps to get a little background info.

Anatomy Of A Sensitive Tooth

All teeth have hollow chambers in their centers. These spaces are filled with blood vessels and loads of nerves. The nerves pick up on temperatures via fluid-filled pores that fill the dentin (middle layer). These pores are insulated on the outside by the outer layer, the enamel. Enamel only covers the top portion of the tooth that’s visible when you smile. Tooth roots don’t have that protection.

How Teeth Get Sensitive

Those tiny nerves in teeth become more exposed to the outside world through two main ways:

  • Enamel is compromised
  • Roots are exposed

Enamel can be damaged or worn via acid erosion, fracture, decay, or simply years of use. Sensitive roots can be exposed as a result of orthodontic treatment, a bad bite, aggressive tooth brushing, or gum inflammation. Some other possible causes of sensitivity include getting a new filling, losing all or part of a restoration, and receiving a blow to your tooth.

What You Can Do About Sensitivity

You may be able to pinpoint a specific area of sensitivity. Or maybe not! It’s possible to suffer this complaint in a generalized way. Start out by taking your meals and drinks neither too hot nor too cold. Switch to a fluoride-rich desensitizing toothpaste to fortify your enamel.

Most importantly, see your dentist ASAP. Some sensitivity can indicate a serious nerve problem that requires root canal therapy. Whatever the case, you’ll get some practical advice and suggestions to help you get relief!

Posted on behalf of:
Montevallo Family Dentistry
711 Wadsworth St
Montevallo, AL 35115
(205) 665-2224

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