Dental Tips Blog

Dec
6

Why Do I Need a Root Canal?

Posted in Root Canals

If your tooth has suffered from recent trauma, a fracture, or damaged by a very large cavity…it probably needs a root canal.

Let’s talk a bit about your tooth anatomy to see why a root canal (endodontic treatment) might be necessary instead of a filling…

Your Tooth – There’s More Than Meets the Eye

The crown of the tooth is the part you can see above your gum tissue. The outer enamel layer protects the body of the tooth which is made of sensitive dentin. Inside the dentin is hollow – it’s a chamber filled with nerves and blood vessels that extend into the roots and jaw.

When the protective outer layers are damaged, the delicate inner chamber can become infected. This leads to an abscess, pain, and infection. If damage is too severe, your tooth may need to be extracted.

What a Root Canal Does

First, your dentist removes damaged tooth surfaces and the nerve inside of your tooth. The nerve chamber is sterilized and filled with a special material to seals out infection. Finally, the tooth receives a crown to reinforce it for everyday wear.

What You Need to Do

See your dentist immediately if you notice signs of nerve damage, such as:

  • Temperature sensitivity
  • Pain
  • Tenderness and swelling around a tooth
  • A discharge or funny taste
  • Change in color of the enamel

The tricky thing is that your tooth could be in grave danger and you might not feel any symptoms at all. Routine dental checkups are important to screen for problems while they’re easier to treat.

Start by visiting your dentist every six months. If he or she doesn’t provide root canals in their office, they will partner with an endodontist who does.

Posted on behalf of:
Cane Bay Family Dentistry
1724 State Rd #4D
Summerville, SC 29483
(843) 376-4157

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