Dental Tips Blog

Feb
16

3 Questions to Ask Your Dentist About Sleep Dentistry

Whether you plan for a little routine dental work or a major procedure with an oral surgeon, you want to know what to expect when it comes to sleep dentistry.

Here are four important questions to discuss with your care provider well before you schedule treatment.

  1. What should I do to prepare?

You can’t just walk in off the street and magically fall asleep for dental treatment. Before you can have any kind of sedation, you’ll need to carefully plan things out with your dentist.

For example, some medications require that you come in on an empty stomach. What you eat and when you take your regular medications can also affect the kind of sedation you have and what time to schedule your treatment.

Additionally, your sedative may require that you take it well before arriving for your procedure. This means you’d need to arrange for a friend to bring you to the dental office.

  1. Will I be conscious?

Not all “sleep dentistry” means that you’ll be completely knocked out. Most dental procedures can be done under a very mild sedation that keeps you conscious. The medications help you relax and forget about the stress of treatment.

Complex procedures like jaw surgery may require general anesthesia which does put you “fully under.”

  1. Could my current medications interact with the sedative?

Some sedatives can be dangerous if taken along with certain other meds. Your dentist will carefully review your medical history before prescribing a sedation technique. But it doesn’t hurt to get ahead and start asking now. The sooner you clear things up, the better.

Don’t hesitate to ask any other questions that come to mind!

Posted on behalf of:
Dr. David Kurtzman D.D.S.
611 Campbell Hill St. NW #101
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 980-6336

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