Dental Tips Blog

Mar
31

What You Can Do to Make Sedation Dentistry Safer

Dental sedation is great for those with dental phobias or who are otherwise unable to sit through treatment. Young children, those with Parkinson’s, and individuals with certain mental disabilities may also benefit.

Want to tackle a laundry list of dental treatment but just don’t have time?

Get it all done in one visit of several hours while comfortably sedated.

But once in a while, you hear a scary story about dental sedation going tragically wrong.

How can you make your procedure safer experience?

Sedation, while serious, is not in itself dangerous – as long as there is sufficient planning and monitoring. People require different sedation methods to meet their unique needs. The medications used to achieve sedation vary.

A well-trained dental team is also important. Accidents often happen when there aren’t enough team members to monitor the patient’s condition during sedation treatment. Sometimes, those responsible for monitoring the patient don’t have the necessary skills to act should something go wrong.

To ensure you have a safe dental sedation procedure, ask your dentist these questions:

  • Exactly what kind of sedation is right for me?
  • What are the requirements for providing dental anesthesia in our area?
  • What is the plan for monitoring my condition and keeping me safe during treatment?
  • Is there an emergency response protocol prepared for in case something goes wrong?

In turn, you can do your part by disclosing to your dentist your entire health history. Certain underlying conditions or medications can have more of an impact than you’d think on a simple sedation procedure.

Not sure about your current health condition? Consult your personal physician and then you’ll be ready to discuss dental sedation with your dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

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