Dental Tips Blog

Jun
20

Moms-to-Be and Dental Anesthesia Safety

Are you an expectant mom?

While you’re eager to welcome your new baby, you aren’t looking forward to getting dental work. For the sake of you and your baby’s health, however, you might not be able to postpone treatment.

Keep these guidelines in mind for safe and comfortable dental treatment during pregnancy:

When Should Pregnant Women Get Dental Treatment?

It’s best to avoid “invasive” dental treatment during the first trimester. That’s when your baby is going through the most significant changes. Your child’s development can easily be affected by medications during those critical first three months.

The second semester is a good time to get necessary dental work done. It’s safer for your baby and easier on you. All non-essential treatment (like teeth whitening) can wait until after your baby is born.

Anytime you have an oral infection, however, you should not wait to get that treated. The bacteria could harm your baby!

Lower Anxiety

Reducing stress on your body is healthier for you and for your growing baby. You’ll want to reduce anxiety and discomfort during those necessary dental visits.

Category B anesthetic injections are considered safe during pregnancy. This means that you can get numbing shots for dental treatment without any risk to your baby.

Dental sedation medications are not recommended for pregnant women, but your dentist can give you safe alternatives, if needed.

Healthy Smile, Healthy Baby!

A study published in The Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA) last year found that there is no connection between dental treatment with anesthetics and negative pregnancy outcomes.

Despite common misconception, dental treatment is actually beneficial to your developing baby’s health. Schedule a visit to your local dentist for a consultation.

Posted on behalf of:
Mercy Dental
1905 East Monte Cristo Road
Edinburg TX 78542
956-404-0220

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