Dental Tips Blog

Aug
15

Is Smoking Really Bad For My Smile?

Posted in Gum Disease

Cigarette use almost always gets attention for being a risk factor for causing lung disease. The fact that it may have any other side effects often get pushed to the side since there may be more serious things like cancer or even death. What a lot of people need to know though, is that even light smoking can do some serious damage to your smile.

We aren’t talking about just making your smile stained or dark (which it can.) We’re talking about the long-term effects on your smile. There is some serious damage that can be done.

Smoking will increase your risk of developing gum disease, or make it impossible to fight gum disease that already exists. The tricky part is that smoking hides your symptoms of the condition: like bleeding or swollen gums. The smoke from the cigarettes causes blood supplies in the area to atrophy, making the gum tissues appear as if nothing is wrong, because there is no sign of infection. This acts as a mask that allows infections deep under your gums to continue developing, causing detached gum tissues and bone loss around the teeth. Before you know it, the teeth become mobile and may even fall out. Gum recession may or may not be present. If you undergo gum treatments such as periodontal therapy, your mouth may not respond the way a healthy individual’s would…and the disease will not reverse.

If you’re a smoker, it’s important to have regular cleanings and periodontal screenings to assess any areas that may be developing into a periodontal condition so that treatment and a smoking cessation plan can begin right away.

Posted on behalf of Dr. Dan Myers, Cosmetic Dentistry Center

Follow Us on Google+

Cosmetic Dentistry Center – Alpharetta Cosmetic Dentist
3070 Windward Plaza, Suite R
Alpharetta, GA 30005
Phone: (678) 366-2322
Mar
25

When Does Gingivitis Turn Into Gum Disease?

Posted in Gum Disease

Gingivitis and gum disease…what’s the difference? Is there a difference? Yes. A tremendous one. A difference so big that it may depend whether or not you keep your teeth!

Gingivitis is simply mild inflammation of the gums, resulting from the presence of plaque or inadequate oral hygiene. Clinically, the inflammation is mild to moderate, located along the edge of the gumlines, and may also have bleeding during brushing or flossing. The most important part about gingivitis is that it can be completely reversed and does not result in any permanent, long-term damage unless it progresses into gum disease. Simple gingivitis can be reversed within 10-14 days with proper brushing and flossing.

Gum disease (“periodontal disease”) is when gingivitis has not been reversed and continues to worsen into a condition that damages the attachment tissues around the teeth. That means pockets develop underneath detached gum tissue, and bone levels around the teeth are lost. Gum disease is irreversible. It is treatable with periodontal therapy, but lost bone cannot be reversed. That’s what makes gum disease the leading cause of tooth loss for adults in this country. Symptoms include chronic swelling, bleeding, bad breath, visible tartar, gum recession, and tooth mobility.

Professional dental care is needed to remove disease-causing bacteria in deep gum pockets, and maintain a healthy environment that prevents further bone loss from occurring. Additional home hygiene aids are needed to access areas that cannot be cleaned with regular brushing or flossing. Active gum disease is also shown to spread oral bacteria throughout the body, increasing the risk of systemic health problems like cardiovascular diseases.

Posted on behalf of Dr. Dan Myers, Cosmetic Dentistry Center

Follow Us on Google+

Cosmetic Dentistry Center – Alpharetta Cosmetic Dentist
3070 Windward Plaza, Suite R
Alpharetta, GA 30005
Phone: (678) 366-2322
Jan
1

Gingivitis

Posted in Gum Disease

Gingivitis is an odd sounding and oddly spelled word, but it can cause life-threatening illnesses if not taken care of right away. Gingivitis is the beginning stage of gum disease that can cause tooth decay, loss of teeth, and infections that can infect the rest of your body.

Early stages of gingivitis result in bacteria that turns into plaque build up. Without removal of plaque, the gums and teeth begin to rot away. Just about everyone can avoid this plaque build up by simply keeping a well established oral hygiene routine of brushing and flossing every day. However, many people do not do this and the results are damaging.

When gingivitis begins to affect the mouth, the teeth will begin to pull away from the gum line. As this happens, bacteria that is naturally occurring in the mouth now moves into unnatural places. Tooth brushes and floss are not designed to reach decayed areas, thus making growing bacteria almost impossible to control. As the gums are more and more exposed by teeth pulling away, bacteria turns infectious and can cause the loss of teeth. Consequently, the loss of teeth exposes even more gums and infectious bacteria thrive in these conditions. Since the gums are a living tissue in the body, infections can travel to every other area in the body and cause serious health problems.

Fortunately, periodontal therapy is very effective in treating gingivitis and gum disease.  If you have sore or bleeding gums, see your dentist or periodontist.

Posted on behalf of Dr. Dan Myers, Cosmetic Dentistry Center

Follow Us on Google+

Cosmetic Dentistry Center – Alpharetta Cosmetic Dentist
3070 Windward Plaza, Suite R
Alpharetta, GA 30005
Phone: (678) 366-2322
Sep
11

Typical Symptoms of Gum Disease

Posted in Gum Disease

Most of us today are aware of the importance of our oral hygiene and gum health. Not only does the health of our gums affect our ability to retain our teeth but it has also been linked directly to the overall health of our bodies. As such, it is important for us to take a proactive stance in warding off gingivitis and periodontal disease. In addition to regular checkups and cleanings with your local dental professional, here are some signs to be on the lookout for.

Healthy gums should be pink, although they can vary from light to dark. Gums that are red in color usually indicate infection. The exception to this rule is in the gums of smokers; because mouth capillaries become damaged starving the gums of oxygen, they will usually stay light pink. As gum infection progresses, they will exhibit increased swelling, accompanied by more redness and bleeding.

Typically, unhealthy gums will start to bleed when brushing or flossing. Contrary to popular opinion, it is not normal for healthy gums to bleed when brushing, flossing or eating crunchy foods. Bleeding, without having suffered a trauma to the mouth through injury or a dental procedure, is an indication of infection.

Another sure sign of damage is receding gums. Such exposure can cause the teeth to feel more sensitive, to cold and hot temperatures, as well as sugar. Chronic and recurring mouth or gum sores could be another symptom, as well as persistent bad breath that cannot be remedied with brushing or mouth wash. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, visit your local dental professional who can help you get your dental health back on track, by identifying and treating the problem right away.

Posted on behalf of Dr. Dan Myers, Cosmetic Dentistry Center

Follow Us on Google+

Cosmetic Dentistry Center – Alpharetta Cosmetic Dentist
3070 Windward Plaza, Suite R
Alpharetta, GA 30005
Phone: (678) 366-2322

Most Popular

Tori, Exostosis, and Extra Bone Formation in the Mouth

A fairly common occurrence in the mouth is the existence of extra bone development along the outside or inside of the jawline near the teeth, or in the roof of…

Difference Between Conscious and Unconscious Sedation

Sedation dentistry is a wonderful option for many people who would not or cannot tolerate dentistry in a traditional dental setting.   Many people have a fear of visiting the dentist,…

Lingual Frenectomy versus Lingual Frenuloplasty

Lingual frenectomy and lingual frenuloplasty are both dental procedures used to correct a condition called ankyloglossia. Ankylogloassia, more commonly known as ‘tied tongue’, is an abnormality of the lingual frenulum….