Dental Tips Blog

Jul
1

How to Get a Younger Smile

Posted in Dental Implants

In this age-focused era, we are all trying to find a way new ways to look younger. We apply creams to reduce the look of fine wrinkles. We color our hair. We go on diets and start exercise programs because we want to look and feel as if we have tasted the fountain of youth.

Having a better smile can do the trick, too. It can also renew your self-confidence and make you more attractive to the opposite sex.

If you don’t already have great teeth, here are several cosmetic options:

Whiteners 

Whether you use an in-home kit purchased over the counter or you visit your dentist for a professional and long-lasting treatment, whitening your teeth can bring the sparkle back to your smile. The degree of whitening depends on the strength of the bleaching solution and the natural color of your teeth. Some dentists use lasers in their whitening treatments.

Veneers 

A veneer is a thin sheet of either porcelain or composite material that is adhered to the tooth with a bonding agent. Veneers can be used to cover a single tooth, or many. Veneers can be expensive, especially porcelain veneers, but they are natural looking and long lasting.

Bonding

If cracked, chipped or broken teeth are your problem, bonding may be a good solution. In this procedure, gaps and fissures are filled with a composite material that closely resembles your natural tooth color. Teeth can be reshaped with bonding, and a cosmetic dentist who is skilled can create a very natural looking, better smile. 

Dental Implants 

Dental implants are recommended if you have missing or badly damaged teeth. Essentially, implants are surgically bonded to the jaw bone, and, to that, artificial teeth made of porcelain or composite are attached. Implants are considered a permanent solution, and serve as a great alternative to dentures.

Posted on behalf of Dr. Mac Worley, Mountain View Oral Surgery and Dental Implants

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Jun
4

Selecting the Best Tooth Replacement Option for You

Posted in Dental Implants

Missing teeth can affect the way your smile looks, and even interfere with the health of the other teeth in the mouth. Just one missing tooth can cause bone loss or teeth to shift out of place as they drift into the open area. By replacing the missing teeth in a timely manner, patients can preserve their chewing and speech functions, as well as protect other teeth in the mouth.

What types of tooth replacement options are available?

  • Dental implants: Implants look, feel, and function like a real tooth. The titanium implant root can support an individual dental crown, multi tooth bridge, or even complete dentures. Expanding choices in dental implants also include mini implants and same-day dental implants.
  • Bridges: One or two teeth can be replaced with a bridge, if a healthy tooth on either side of the space is available. A bridge is 3 or 4 crowns fused together, with the center crowns being pontic crowns that are suspended by the functional crowns on either end.
  • Partial or Full Dentures: These removable prosthesis are used to replace several teeth at a time. Full dentures replace all teeth at once, while partial dentures replace multiple teeth as they snap around existing healthy teeth. Dentures are removed for cleaning as well as during sleep.

Talk to your dentist about what options you’re a candidate for. Often, there is not only one way to replace a missing tooth. The health of your existing teeth, bone levels, budget, and personal preferences will all play a key part in deciding the type of treatment that you choose.

Posted on behalf of Dr. Mac Worley, Mountain View Oral Surgery and Dental Implants

Google

Jun
4

Retained Baby Teeth (When An Adult Tooth Is Missing)

Posted in Dental Implants

From time to time, some growing children will experience the lack of permanent tooth development in one of their teeth. Typically, the missing adult tooth is one of the premolars (bicuspids) that would have replaced a primary (baby) molar. As a result, the primary molar never falls out with the rest of their baby teeth, and stays in place for several more years.

Unfortunately, baby teeth are not designed to withstand a lifetime of use. In the most positive outcomes, retained primary molars may last until the person is around 30 years of age. At this point it typically no longer has healthy root support and becomes mobile and falls out. Dedicated oral hygiene, including daily flossing, is necessary to extend the life of these teeth to this point.

Eventually, these teeth are lost and will need to be replaced. An open space between healthy teeth can cause drifting of teeth throughout the mouth, including the opposite arch. Having a game plan in advance can prepare patients for their tooth replacement option before the day arrives. Options for tooth replacement and space maintenance typically include dental implants or a fixed bridge. If the tooth is lost very early in a person’s life, a removable flipper or partial can be worn until the rest of the mouth is fully developed.

Adults that have missing teeth may pass the condition on to their children. Seeing the dentist regularly is important. Monitoring the eruption patterns of the teeth can easily be done through routine radiographs like panoramic films or bitewing x-rays. Children, just like adults, should see their dentist twice a year to monitor oral health conditions that relate to decay and the development of their permanent teeth.

Posted of the behalf of Justin Scott

Google

May
8

Computer Guided Implant Placement

Posted in Dental Implants

The right amount of bone in the mouth is essential for a successful dental implant treatment. Sometimes the anatomy of the bone may be compromised due to physical factors, history of gum disease, or sinus problems. Thankfully, computer guided implant placement can capitalize on areas where bone levels are their best, and make implant therapy extremely successful. Even patients that have previously been told that they are not candidates for dental implants may find that computer guided treatments are possible!

Healing is dramatically reduced with these types of treatments, because the surgical placement is so precise. What used to take as long as 6 months for proper healing before a permanent implant abutment could be delivered can now be done in just 3 months.

Once your implant is placed using CT guiding technology, it is covered and allowed to have new bone fuse around the artificial titanium root. This bone fusion and development is called “osseointegration,” and is essential for long-term success of the implant. Once osseointegration is achieved, an implant can support even more weight than a natural tooth. The implant is uncovered, an abutment is placed, and the permanent restoration such as a crown, bridge, or denture is fixed into place.

Implants provide a permanent, secure option for patients in need of tooth replacement. What used to be an option only for a select patients is now becoming the go-to treatment preferred by most dentists and their patients for replacing single, multiple, or all of the teeth. If you’ve had questions about whether or not you are a candidate for implants, or have previously been told that you are not, then schedule a consultation with a dentist that offers computer guided implant placement.

Posted on behalf of Dr. Mac Worley, Mountain View Oral Surgery and Dental Implants

Google

Feb
11

Dentures on Implants – A New Take on Teeth

Posted in Dental Implants

How would you like to give up your set of full-sized, bulky dentures for a new denture appliance that takes up only 1/3 of the space? Believe it or not, it’s an option! All-on-4 Implant supported dentures are an exciting twist on denture therapy, and offer a permanent solution for tooth replacement needs.

Implant supported dentures are “U” shaped, and only cover the arched bone area where the teeth should be. This frees up the roof of the mouth and other areas that traditionally help the dentures stay in place using suction. Instead, the U-shaped denture is fastened onto a few supporting dental implant roots that have been anchored into the bone. Once the denture is fastened onto the implant abutments, it stays in place permanently. You’ll never have to take it out at night or worry about going without your teeth.

Titanium implant root supports function the same as a natural tooth root, but they are actually stronger than a real tooth. Each implant root is placed into the jaw in the same area where your first tooth was. Bone formation then occurs around the root and helps secure it into place. After a few months of healing have occurred, the implant can support nearly any type of fixed appliance.  That includes a denture! Typically only about 4 dental implants are needed per arch to support a full denture (8 implants for the entire mouth.) This will obviously depend on how healthy the bone levels are.

If you’ve had problems with ill-fitting dentures, or simply want to consider an appliance that is easier to talk and eat in, schedule an implant consultation to find out if All-on-4 dentures are right for you!

Posted on behalf of Dr. Mac Worley, Mountain View Oral Surgery and Dental Implants

Google

Dec
17

Tooth Replacement Options for Your Smile

Posted in Dental Implants

A missing tooth can affect your self-confidence, how you eat, and even the health of other teeth in your mouth. Whether or not it shows when you smile, a missing tooth can cause other teeth to drift out of place throughout the mouth, changing the way you chew and even causing food buildup between teeth. Replacing your tooth will keep other teeth in proper alignment and minimize the impact you have during meals or speech. But what types of tooth replacements are available, or best for your individual needs?

Dental implants are now the primary choice of treatment for replacing teeth in people with healthy bone levels throughout their mouth. An implant functions as an individual tooth, or can be used to support multiple tooth prosthesis such as bridges or dentures. Different types of dental implants are available, with some being placed the same day or others taking a few months to integrate with your bone.

Bridges are the traditional treatment used for replacing a tooth when there are healthy teeth adjacent to the open area. Bridges are similar to 3 or 4 crowns fused together, with false crowns between the 2 end crowns (which are placed on the supporting healthy teeth.)

Partial dentures or full dentures are used when a large number or all of the teeth are missing. This prosthesis is removable, or can be anchored onto dental implants. Dentures are perhaps the most economical choice of tooth replacement available to patients, making them a popular choice for many people.

Everyone’s oral health is different, so it’s important to schedule a consultation with our dentist to find out what type of treatment will meet your needs.

Posted on behalf of Dr. Mac Worley, Mountain View Oral Surgery and Dental Implants

Google

Aug
1

Risks of Dental Implant Surgery

Posted in Dental Implants

Though dental implants offer a great alternative to crowns, bridges and dentures, dental implant surgery is by no means a minor operation. Depending on the needs of the specific patient, it can mean more than a year of procedures until your implant is in place and fully functional. So that inevitably means there are risks involved.

While most dental implant procedures are successful – studies show a 95 percent success rate – there are times when problems arise, resulting in the need for additional treatment.

As with any surgery, the risk of infection is always present and the average mouth is filled with bacteria. To avoid infection post-surgery, your dentist or periodontist will recommend that you step up your oral health routine with brushing, flossing and rinsing after every meal.

Another issue that can arise is insufficient bone mass or structure. Dental implants are affixed to the jaw bone, usually with titanium, so a solid base is a must. If bone is soft or there is not enough, bone grafting may be necessary. In this procedure, bone is taken from another part of the body, usually the hip, to strengthen the jaw.

Also, since the upper jaw is close to the sinus area, there is always a chance that the sinus area can be damaged during dental implant surgery. Your surgeon, however, will typically assess the risk of this happening and recommend an additional procedure, called sinus enlargement, prior to the implant surgery.

Finally, with dental implants, there is always the risk of nerve damage, resulting in pain or numbness in the mouth. This can be temporary or permanent, and, in the latter case, may require additional surgery.

If you are considering dental implant surgery, talk to your dentist or periodontist to devise a plan that’s geared toward your own specific needs. And remember, good oral hygiene habits will always help you avoid complications with any procedure.

Posted on behalf of Mountain View Oral Surgery and Dental Implants

Google

Aug
1

What are Dental Implants?

Posted in Dental Implants

Those individuals with missing teeth now have a viable option to traditional  dental bridges and removable dentures for missing teeth replacement.  Known as dental implants, they are surgically implanted in the jaw bone, where a tooth or series of teeth are missing.  Implants provide the root structure  for the attachment of a tooth or a series of teeth.  Made to look like the patients existing teeth, the replacement tooth or teeth can be attached either in a permanent fashion or as removable.  Dental implants are not for everyone, however they can be life changing for those who are good candidates.  Patients typically have one or more implants typically have improved physical appearance and self esteem, as well as improved eating, speaking and over all comfort.

The best thing to do is to discuss dental implants with your dentist. Many dentists now place dental implants, but those who do not will refer the patient to a qualified periodontist, who is a specialized dental practitioner that specializes in dental implants.  The patient will be examined and the results of the examination will determine if the patient is a good candidate for an implant, as well as the type of implant that will best suit the patient.  There are a number of specific areas that the doctor will be looking at during the examination, including the overall health of the patient, as well as if the patient has good gums and enough bone in the jaw to hold the implant in place.  It is important to remember that if a patient receives a dental implant, the patient must still floss and brush the area around the implant just like any other tooth.  A dental implant is not a “pass” to disregard poor dental hygiene!

Anyone with missing teeth should consult with their dentist to learn more about dental implants.  The dentist will provide suitable guidance and take the necessary steps to determine if the patient is a suitable candidate.  Dental implants could be a life-changing event for those missing teeth!

Posted of the behalf of Justin Scott

Google

May
9

When a Permanent Tooth is Missing

Posted in Dental Implants

A fairly frequent dental anomaly is to find that a permanent tooth is missing from underneath its primary tooth predecessor. This is typically discovered when your child has routine bitewing dental x-rays taken at their preventive care appointment.  A larger panoramic x-ray of their entire mouth can identify if the tooth is impacted or completely missing altogether.

Some of the most commonly missing adult teeth are:

  • Wisdom teeth (3rd set of molars)
  • Second premolars (under a child’s 12 year primary molar)
  • Upper lateral incisors (the 2nd set of teeth from the center of the mouth)

If you or your spouse has a congenitally missing tooth, your child is at an increased risk to miss the same exact teeth. The problem presents itself when the primary (baby) tooth can no longer function. Root formation of primary teeth is not designed for long-term use, and the tooth will naturally resorb over time, whether or not a permanent tooth is taking its place. Most primary teeth that are retained due to a missing permanent tooth will typically fall out by around age 30. Extremely dedicated oral hygiene is needed to even maintain the tooth’s health this long.

Once a primary tooth has exfoliated, it becomes a priority to put a tooth replacement in the open space. Leaving an area such as this untreated will cause adjacent teeth to shift out of place, including teeth in the opposite arch. This causes tooth misalignment throughout the entire mouth and can cause cosmetic concerns, increased gum disease, and increased risk of decay. Common treatment methods for replacement of missing permanent teeth include dental implants, fixed bridges, or temporary flippers.

Posted on behalf of Mountain View Oral Surgery and Dental Implants

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Feb
10

Is It Necessary to Replace a Missing Tooth?

Posted in Dental Implants

If a tooth has been pulled due to trauma or disease, most dental patients are then asked what options they prefer for replacing the now missing tooth. But is it really important? Many people get along just well without all of their teeth and quite often wonder why it may be that their dentist keeps suggesting having a new tooth put into the now open space.

Be it a dental implant, bridge or partial denture, your dentist will suggest replacing a missing tooth, and there is quite some good reasoning behind this.

Missing teeth cause the other teeth to shift. 

When a tooth is missing, the teeth adjacent to it began to drift inward. This predisposes those teeth to conditions like gum disease and cause a chain reaction of tooth drifting throughout the rest of the mouth. This causes problems if you’ve had braces, wear an appliance such as a partial denture, or have bone loss. The tooth in the opposite arch that now no longer has a tooth to bite against can begin to “super-erupt” out of its socket, looking for something to occlude with and causing problems in the teeth around it as well.

Misaligned teeth are prone to advanced wear. 

Teeth that are not aligned properly due to shifting will not wear in a natural pattern. This causes advanced abrasion to the tooth enamel resulting in flat, worn teeth much sooner than what is normal.

Again, did we mention gum disease?

Misaligned teeth are prone to gum disease because they are more difficult to keep clean. Food, plaque and tartar usually build up in the areas under the gums next to the root, causing the tooth to develop gum disease, which can lead to tooth loss.

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