Dental Tips Blog

Nov
8

Dentures Making You Gag?

Posted in Dentures

The good thing about the way our mouths are set up is that we don’t gag on normal structures like our teeth or tongues. Gagging is an issue common to many people and denture wearers in particular. If this is a frequent problem for you, then you need a solution that will help you deal with it. Going without dentures is not an option!

Gagging On Dentures – Why It Happens

Gagging happens when an unnatural object touches a sensitive area in your mouth. Gag points tend be located farther back on your palate and throat. A denture that rests on the front palate could trigger gagging if it extends too far back to the soft palate.

What Can You Do?

First, see if the way you put your dentures in is causing the trouble. Have a sit-down with your dentist and try out different techniques for seating your appliance without letting it brush against any sensitive spots in your mouth.

Pay attention to where your tongue is in your mouth. If it’s wandering around too much, it could jostle a denture loose or draw attention to a sensitive spot. In contrast, you can use your tongue to help stabilize your appliance.

Give yourself a little time if you’re still getting used to a first denture. Your mouth needs to adjust to the presence of the appliance. You’ll probably drool a lot and have a sensitive gag-reflex during the early weeks, but with time, it will start to feel natural.

If all else fails, see your dentist to find out if a denture adjustment or implant option is the best solution to your gagging problem.

Posted on behalf of:
Town Center Dental
1110 State Route 55, Suite 107
Lagrangeville, NY 12540
(845) 486-4572

Oct
30

How Are Dentures Made?

Posted in Dentures

Despite being false teeth, dentures are not a one-size-fits-all kind of deal. To get a denture made is a lengthy and detailed process.

First of all, your dentist will capture a mold of your mouth as it is right now. He or she will do this by taking impressions with a putty-like material. Soon after these molds are done, they’re filled with liquid stone that sets up to create a cast replica of your gums.

These stone models are set up on a frame that lines them up to simulate how your jaw moves. That way, a dental lab can use the models to design teeth that fit together in a way that feels natural to you.

Dentures are created from materials like acrylic with the teeth occasionally being made of porcelain. The dental technician creates teeth that look just the way you told your dentist you wanted them to. These teeth are fastened to the stone model with wax. This wax can also be formed to resemble the fake gums on your denture.

After completing this “wax up,” the lab tech then packs it into a container filled with that liquid stone. Once the stone sets, the wax can be boiled and poured away. This leaves behind the teeth and a perfect outline for the acrylic gums to be poured into. The final result? A finished denture.

You’ll be going back and forth to your dentist’s multiple times over the course of this process. The lab and your dentist will need to verify that everything fits your mouth as planned. You also have the most say in how you want your denture teeth to look.

Find out more by calling your dentist today.

Posted on behalf of:
Lufkin Family Dental
701 S. John Redditt Dr.
Lufkin, TX 75904
(963) 634-5102

Oct
9

Basic Denture Do’s and Don’ts

Posted in Dentures

It’s easy to slack off when it comes to proper denture use and care. Hey, we all need reminders from time to time, and especially when we get into bad habits. Denture care is no exception. Keep your mouth healthy and your denture strong for as long as possible with these simple tips.

DO soak your denture anytime it’s not in use to prevent stain and keep it moist.

DON’T ever soak your denture in bleach to attempt lightening tooth color!

DO clean your denture with a denture brush to remove debris daily.

DON’T use any household tools to attempt to chip away tartar or stain.

DO use warm water with an effervescent denture cleaner tablet.

DON’T place your denture in hot water which can warp the acrylic.

DO use a denture adhesive to enhance the security of the fit.

DON’T use a denture adhesive to compensate for an ill-fitting denture.

DO use a gentle hand soap or dish liquid to cleanse your denture, if needed.

DON’T reach for any abrasive household scrubbing products!

DO give your gums time to “breathe” each day.

DON’T sleep in your denture since this promotes infection and dry mouth.

DO clean your mouth and gums daily with gauze or a soft toothbrush.

DON’T ever attempt to clean your dentures with denture chemicals while wearing them.

To make sure your denture is still fitting comfortably and that your current denture care routine is working, see your local dentist. Your dentist will also keep you updated on any changes in the tissues of your mouth.

Don’t procrastinate – do schedule your visit today!

Posted on behalf of:
ABQ Dentures
2010 Wyoming Blvd NE
Albuquerque, NM 87112
(505) 933-7794

Sep
27

The Best Possible Denture Cleaning Routine

Posted in Dentures

Regular denture maintenance is key to keeping your oral appliance functional and comfortable. You can minimize costly accidents, repairs, and treatments associated with dental health by making sure your denture is always as clean as possible.

Here’s what you can do to keep your denture comfortable, beautiful, and strong:

Rinse after eating – every time.

Don’t wait until it’s time to scrub your dentures. You should give them a brief rinse every time you eat. This is especially important after eating foods that could leave deep stains on your denture.

Clean your mouth.

A clean denture in itself isn’t enough. Germs and food debris left in your mouth can transfer back to your denture. Carefully brush and floss remaining teeth daily. If there are no teeth left, remember to clean your tongue, wipe your gums, and freshen up with a rinse before putting your false teeth back in place.

Brush your denture.

Just dunking your hands in water is no way to wash them. Similarly, your denture needs more than a quick rinse. Scrub your denture at least daily with a soft denture-safe brush. This will minimize stain and tartar.

Soak your denture.

When not in use, especially overnight, your denture needs to soak in a denture solution or plain water. The acrylic will stay supple and you’ll maintain the proper-fitting shape longer.

Handle with care.

It’s easy to drop a slippery and delicate denture while trying to clean it. When handling your appliance, avoid pressing on metal parts or scrubbing hard. Always clean it over a surface cushioned with a towel.

For more tips on extending the life and function of your denture, contact your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Short Pump Family Dentistry
201 Towne Center West Blvd
Suite 709
Richmond, VA 23233
804-332-5505

Sep
22

Dentures: How They’re Made

Posted in Dentures

Wondering how people get such realistic-looking “false teeth?”

Long gone are the days of using outdated materials or even natural wood/bone as they did in centuries prior to ours. Today’s denture process results in smiles that are as beautiful as they are functional.

Measuring Your Mouth

The first step in denture fabrication is determining your mouth’s shape so that a denture is the right size. A dentist starts by taking an impression with a putty material. Once the impression sets, it serves as the base for creating a cast model.

Stone models are then set up on an articulator, or frame, which helps the denture designers to determine at which point the teeth should meet.

Creating the Denture

Typically, the dentist sends the models and measurements to a dental lab for designing the actual denture. Some dentists are able to do it themselves.

Either way, the next step is placing wax over the model’s “gums.” Then, false teeth selected to match the shape you want are placed into the wax wherever teeth are needed.

Once the whole layout looks correct, the model gets put in liquid stone which holds the teeth in place when it hardens. After that sets, the wax in the model is boiled away and acrylic is poured in, to fill out the gums and palate.

The denture comes out ready for try-on.

Interested in a Denture?

Dentures are great substitutes for teeth that have been lost to decay, trauma, or gum disease.

But having a quality denture made can take a little time, what with all the adjusting and sending back-and-forth. Your new teeth could take around five separate appointments to have made.

So if you’re thinking about getting a denture, then contact your dentist soon to set up a consultation.

Posted on behalf of:
Marvin Village Dentistry
8161 Ardrey Kell Road
Suite 101
Charlotte, NC 28277
(704) 579-5513

Sep
19

Signs You May Have Oral Thrush

Posted in Dentures

Thrush is a fungal infection that can cause some considerable discomfort in your mouth. People at risk for getting oral thrush include those who:

  • Wear dentures
  • Smoke cigarettes
  • Are taking antibiotics or corticosteroids
  • Are having treatment for cancer

Thrush is most common among babies and infants and tends to affect those with a weakened immune system.

If you struggle with a condition such as diabetes or HIV infection, then your body is prone to an imbalance in natural bacteria. Couple that with weak immunity, and a fungal infection can take off with little trouble.

What to Look For

Some of the main signs of a thrush infection include:

White bumps or coating. A pale coating on the tongue, gums, cheeks, and throat is a pretty sure sign of a fungal infection.

Pain and dryness. Cracks at the corners of the mouth may make it painful to eat.

Difficulty swallowing.

Bleeding. If the white patches in your mouth bleed when you bump them (like with a toothbrush), then that’s almost a giveaway for thrush.

In babies, thrush may cause irritability and affect the child’s ability to eat.

Keep in mind that these symptoms may only show up once your case advances. Early stages of thrush can be hard to identify on your own.

How To Avoid A Thrush Infection

Add some probiotics into your diet any time you take an antibiotic. If you use an inhaler that contains corticosteroids, make sure that you rinse your mouth well afterwards. Above all, great oral hygiene is the biggest key to preventing a thrush infection. This involves daily brushing and flossing and removing/cleaning your denture every night.

Find out more about oral fungal infections by scheduling a consultation with your dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Ambler Dental Care
602 S Bethlehem Pike C-2
Ambler, PA 19002
(215) 643-1122

Aug
30

4 Reasons You Should Be Soaking Your Dentures Every Night

Posted in Dentures

You’ve heard it over and over before: take your denture out every night and soak it.

It’s easy to get a little lazy in this matter. Can you really help it if you accidentally fall asleep with your denture in? Even still, these four reasons can help you to see the light and remember to take your dentures out as your dentist directs.

  1. Decrease In Saliva

Saliva is essential to digestion and keeping your mouth comfortable. It also strengthens remaining teeth against decay. Additionally, saliva fights bacteria that cause bad breath and disease.

Whether due to aging, medication, or simply the presence of the denture itself, your saliva production may be slowing down. This is a bad thing in the wake of an increase of bacteria your mouth sees as you get older.

It’s good to take your denture out for a while so that the germs can’t multiply as quickly.

  1. Dentures Provide The Perfect Bacteria Hideout

Most dentures are made of acrylic which is loaded with tiny pores you can’t easily see. These pores pack in with bacteria throughout the course of the day. Soaking is the best way to lower the microbe count and thoroughly clean your denture.

  1. Soaking Lifts Stain

A stain-lifting denture solution is the best way to keep your dentures sparkling. Soaking your denture makes it easier for you to brush residue away the next morning.

  1. Your Gums Need A Break!

Constant pressure and friction from a denture can irritate the gums and make the bone resorb faster. Cut that wear time in half by soaking your dentures at night.

Talk with your dentist for more expert tips on denture care.

Posted on behalf of:
Avalon Dental Group P.C.
2205 Williams Trace Blvd #108
Sugar Land, TX 77478
(281) 240-5559

Jul
25

4 Signs You Should See Your Dentist For a Denture Adjustment or Repair

Posted in Dentures

It’s nice to think that once you get a set of false teeth you’ll never have to worry about them again. On the contrary, although they aren’t the same as natural teeth, you still have a big responsibility on your hands.

Or on your gums, rather.

Getting your denture adjusted and repaired on a regular basis is healthier for your mouth and can even extend the life of your appliance.

  1. Sores On Gums

A loose denture will chafe uncomfortably against soft tissues in your mouth. That’s definitely not normal for a denture. If the fit isn’t improved, those sore spots will only get worse until you can’t bear to wear your denture at all.

  1. Using Lots Of Adhesive

A little denture paste or cream goes a long way. In fact, the better your denture fits, the better the adhesive works. But if you find yourself dabbing on more paste than usual to hold your denture down, it may be time to have it tightened a bit.

  1. Slipping

Is your sandwich just not chewing the way it usually does?

Either the bread is stale, or your dentures don’t have a stable fit anymore. Over time, your jawbone shrinks under the pressure of dentures. Your appliance will need to be adjusted to compensate for those changes.

  1. Small Cracks

If your denture still fits, you might not think a small nick or hairline fracture is a big deal. But it will get bigger the longer it’s left there. It also provides a hideout for smelly bacteria and fungus.

Ask your dentist about the right time to get a denture adjustment.

Posted on behalf of:
Columbine Creek Dentistry
4760 W Mineral Ave #60
Littleton, CO 80128
(720) 636-9010

Jun
28

4 Reasons People Get Dentures

Posted in Dentures

Dentures aren’t just a rite-of-passage for aged individuals! People of all ages and backgrounds could need false teeth for several different reasons.

  1. Severe Tooth Decay

Some people have had to get dentures at a fairly young age because they lost their teeth early on to rampant decay.

Some patients feel it’s not worth the effort to restore teeth with cavities and opt to have them pulled.

As a denture-alternative, many patients choose to get implants to support their tooth replacements. 

  1. Advanced Gum Disease

It’s a misconception that everyone loses their teeth as a result of aging. By taking good care of your gums, you can hold onto your teeth for as long as you want.

For some patients, however, it’s a little too late. In other cases, rare health conditions make it nearly impossible to keep teeth in place. For these individuals, dentures become their only shot at enjoying a functioning smile once again.

  1. Trauma From An Accident

Contact sports are a common cause of tooth-loss, especially in the front of the mouth.

After getting a tooth or two knocked out, you won’t necessarily need a full denture. As long as your remaining teeth are healthy, a partial denture will suffice.

  1. Damage From Oral Cancer

All kinds of cancers of the head and neck can affect jaw structure. Surgery to treat a dangerous growth can result in a loss of teeth. Patients who beat this disease may eventually decide to restore their smiles with a set of dentures.

Are you missing any teeth right now? Your dentist would be happy to show you how you can complete your smile with the help of dentures.

Posted on behalf of:
Riverheart Family Dentistry
8618 Mexico Road
O’Fallon, MO 63366
(636) 205-4045

Jun
9

3 Keys to Adjusting to Life with Dentures

Posted in Dentures

Your first set of dentures marks a turning point in your life. You’ve spent most of your years using natural teeth so the transition is a tough one, both physically and emotionally.

Here are a few things that will help make your adjustment as successful as possible:

Patience

There’s no denying the fact that the first time you try a denture it will feel strange or even uncomfortable.

Your prosthesis will probably feel way too big for your mouth. This will result in some drooling. But don’t give up! Follow your dentist’s instructions and give yourself time to adjust at your own pace.

Try to maintain a sense of humor and optimism as you get used to your denture. It will improve as the days go by.

Practice

It’s unrealistic to imagine eating out with friends at a fancy steakhouse the very day you get your dentures.

Push those plans out a month or so and let yourself practice chewing at home free from the public eye. You can start out with soft foods and slowly work up to chewier items.

Also, practice cutting up your food so that you know in advance how large or small the pieces should be. Remember, “practice makes perfect.”

Plenty Of (Denture) Paste

A well-fitting denture doesn’t need much help to stay in place. In fact, the better the fit, the better an adhesive product will work. Less is more, when it comes to denture pastes and creams.

Don’t be shy to use these products especially in the beginning. They’ll help you feel more confidence about wearing your new smile in public.

Discuss your concerns with your dentist before you receive your first denture.

Posted on behalf of:
Mundo Dentistry
3463 US-21 #101
Fort Mill, SC 29715
(704) 825-2018

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