Dental Tips Blog

Feb
16

What Is a Denture Reline?

Posted in Dentures

If your denture has started bothering you as of late, then a visit to the dentist for a reline may be in order.

Relining dentures isn’t an expensive procedure. But it can do a lot to improve the comfort of your bite.

Hard vs. Soft Relines

When a dentist relines a denture, he or she applies a layer of material to the inside to make it more comfortable and fit your mouth’s current shape.

A hard reline takes more time and usually requires sending your denture to a lab for a detailed job. Soft relines involve a simple liquid polymer and can often be done by your dentist right there their office.

Why a Reline?

The pressure of using a denture can actually wear down the bone beneath gum tissue. Eventually, this causes a change in the shape of your jaw so that your denture no longer fits the way it originally did. In a way, your denture outgrows your mouth.

Your bone may have already been affected if your denture:

  • Slips around a lot
  • Chafes and causes sores on your gums
  • Requires an adhesive now more than you did before

This process of bone resorption tends to happen most quickly during the first few months after you get dentures. After that, this continues to happen at a slower rate. This is why it’s common to need a reline within the first six months of getting a new prosthesis.

Don’t depend on a powder or paste to give your denture a secure fit. Tackle the problem right at the source. Contact your dentist today to schedule a denture reline appointment.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Smiles Dentistry
2655 Dallas Highway Suite 510
Marietta, GA 30064
770.422.8776

Jan
29

Preparing Yourself for Getting Dentures

Posted in Dentures

It’s hard to believe you’re at this point in your life – the dentist has advised you to get all your remaining teeth pulled and replaced with a denture.

Perhaps you ask yourself how you got here. You might find yourself reviewing poor decisions you made about your dental health in earlier years.

It might be too late to regret skipped dental visits now, but it’s not too late to change one thing: your view of the situation.

Focus On The Benefits

Dentures aren’t shameful. They are an essential tool for enjoying life for anybody who has lost teeth for any reason. Think about how you’ll be able to enjoy a clean pain-free mouth with fresh breath and smile confidently in photos.

Do A Little Research

Dentures are often a barrier to good nutrition since they can reduce the capacity of your bite. When you have to worry about your teeth slipping and sliding, you’re more likely to opt for mac ‘n’ cheese than a fresh salad.

With a little research, you can find ways to enjoy healthy and tasty foods prepared in denture-friendly ways. Start now so that you can have a personalized recipe book ready to go.

Build Trust In Your Dentist

The most important thing you can do is get to know your dentist who will be providing you with your new denture. When you have a trusting relationship, you’ll be confident that you’ll like your new look. It also makes it easier to freely voice any concerns you may have.

Contact your dentist with any more denture questions.

Posted on behalf of:
Dental Care of Acworth
5552 Robin Road Suite A
Acworth GA 30103
678-888-1554

Jan
10

Lessons on Oral Hygiene from George Washington’s Denture

Posted in Dentures

We’ve all heard about Washington’s wooden dentures. But what most people don’t know is that they weren’t actually made of wood.

George Washington wore many dentures throughout the course of his life, none of which were made from the porcelain and acrylic we have today. Washington’s dentures were primarily made from hippopotamus ivory, lead, gold plate, and teeth from cows, horses, and possibly some of his own slaves.

Like George Washington, you may not be thrilled at the prospect of losing teeth. But happily, we have much more comfortable and attractive denture options available today.

Take Care Of Your Denture!

One of George Washington’s dentists had to reprimand him on how much port wine he consumed – he was evidently drinking enough to be staining his dentures.

If you have a denture, you certainly expect it to serve you well while you eat. Just remember to clean it daily, scrubbing and soaking it to avoid stain and bacteria accumulation.

Make Your Natural Teeth Last

Washington had his last natural tooth pulled at 60 years of age (mind you, that was without any anesthetic!). Most folks today can expect to keep more teeth than that when they turn 60, thanks to improvements in dentistry. Emphasis on fluoride and preventative care have also made a big difference in the life expectancy of a person’s smile.

You have to do your part to make your teeth last as long as possible. Daily brushing and flossing are essential, even if you don’t have many teeth left. Get more tips from your dentist on how to save your natural teeth.

Posted on behalf of:
Dentistry of Kingwood
1520 Greek Oak Pl, Suite B
Kingwood, TX 77339
(281) 358-2191

Jan
4

These Signs Could Mean That You Have Denture Stomatitis

Posted in Dentures

While this may be the first time you’re hearing about denture stomatitis, odds are good that you have heard of thrush before. A thrush infection can occur in anyone with a weakened immune system. But it is actually most common among denture wearers.

Thrush is an infection resulting from an excessive growth of a yeast called Candida albicans. This fungus is present in everyone’s mouths but it tends to take over when bacterial populations are out of balance or oral hygiene is poor…and often under dentures.

The warm moist space between your gums and a denture makes a prime place for this yeast to thrive in. So, if you wear one, here are some signs that you could have a classic case of thrush.

You…

  • Don’t remove your denture for daily cleaning
  • Don’t allow your mouth to “rest” or “breathe” each day
  • Notice redness under your denture
  • Have sore spots at the corners of your mouth
  • Have a denture that isn’t fitting right these days, and actually hurts a little

Use of an inhaler also ups your chances that denture discomfort is connected to thrush. It doesn’t take much for you dentist to diagnose denture-related stomatitis. A look at your gums and a few questions about your denture hygiene are usually all it takes, but a lab test can also confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment for thrush may involve a prescription medication. But the best thing to do starting out is simply to stop wearing your denture so much. Red and angry gums are saying that they’ve had enough! Your dentist will review with you some instructions for keeping your denture clean and comfortable.

Contact your dentist if it seems that your denture could be contributing to a case of thrush.

Posted on behalf of:
Basin Dentistry
5016 Briarwood Ave
Midland, TX 79707
(462) 699-7334

Dec
12

“I’m Happy Without Teeth – I Don’t Need Dentures” . . . Or Do You?

Posted in Dentures

For most people, losing their teeth is their worst nightmare. Literally. Terror-filled dreams about teeth falling out keep many folks up at night. The social implications of running around without teeth is a scary thought.

On the other hand, there are those of us who aren’t too bothered about not having any teeth.

Why get fake teeth if you don’t care about others seeing you without any teeth, at all?

In reality, there is far more to dentures than aesthetics, alone.

Dentures Help You Stay Healthy

Without teeth, it’s not hard to choose between a salad or mac-and-cheese for dinner. But a steady diet of mac-and-cheese won’t do your body much good.

The most important reason for wearing dentures is simply the fact that they keep your nutritional options varied. When you can chew, even with false teeth, it’ll be easier to fuel up on essential vitamins from natural sources.

Dentures Will Give You New Confidence

You may say you don’t care about being seen without teeth, but it’s a different story come time for the family photo or alumni reunion. When you know you have teeth to smile with, it’ll be easier to show off that smile without any awkwardness.

Even if you don’t mind being seen without dentures, caught with dentures slipping, whatever, that can be a good thing! It’s ideal to have a sense of humor as you adjust to your new appliance and you’ll still get all the functional benefits.

To learn more about how a denture can enhance the quality of your life right now, talk with your dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Dream Dentist
1646 W U.S. 50
O’Fallon, IL 62269
(618) 726-2699

Nov
8

Dentures Making You Gag?

Posted in Dentures

The good thing about the way our mouths are set up is that we don’t gag on normal structures like our teeth or tongues. Gagging is an issue common to many people and denture wearers in particular. If this is a frequent problem for you, then you need a solution that will help you deal with it. Going without dentures is not an option!

Gagging On Dentures – Why It Happens

Gagging happens when an unnatural object touches a sensitive area in your mouth. Gag points tend be located farther back on your palate and throat. A denture that rests on the front palate could trigger gagging if it extends too far back to the soft palate.

What Can You Do?

First, see if the way you put your dentures in is causing the trouble. Have a sit-down with your dentist and try out different techniques for seating your appliance without letting it brush against any sensitive spots in your mouth.

Pay attention to where your tongue is in your mouth. If it’s wandering around too much, it could jostle a denture loose or draw attention to a sensitive spot. In contrast, you can use your tongue to help stabilize your appliance.

Give yourself a little time if you’re still getting used to a first denture. Your mouth needs to adjust to the presence of the appliance. You’ll probably drool a lot and have a sensitive gag-reflex during the early weeks, but with time, it will start to feel natural.

If all else fails, see your dentist to find out if a denture adjustment or implant option is the best solution to your gagging problem.

Posted on behalf of:
Town Center Dental
1110 State Route 55, Suite 107
Lagrangeville, NY 12540
(845) 486-4572

Oct
30

How Are Dentures Made?

Posted in Dentures

Despite being false teeth, dentures are not a one-size-fits-all kind of deal. To get a denture made is a lengthy and detailed process.

First of all, your dentist will capture a mold of your mouth as it is right now. He or she will do this by taking impressions with a putty-like material. Soon after these molds are done, they’re filled with liquid stone that sets up to create a cast replica of your gums.

These stone models are set up on a frame that lines them up to simulate how your jaw moves. That way, a dental lab can use the models to design teeth that fit together in a way that feels natural to you.

Dentures are created from materials like acrylic with the teeth occasionally being made of porcelain. The dental technician creates teeth that look just the way you told your dentist you wanted them to. These teeth are fastened to the stone model with wax. This wax can also be formed to resemble the fake gums on your denture.

After completing this “wax up,” the lab tech then packs it into a container filled with that liquid stone. Once the stone sets, the wax can be boiled and poured away. This leaves behind the teeth and a perfect outline for the acrylic gums to be poured into. The final result? A finished denture.

You’ll be going back and forth to your dentist’s multiple times over the course of this process. The lab and your dentist will need to verify that everything fits your mouth as planned. You also have the most say in how you want your denture teeth to look.

Find out more by calling your dentist today.

Posted on behalf of:
Lufkin Family Dental
701 S. John Redditt Dr.
Lufkin, TX 75904
(963) 634-5102

Oct
9

Basic Denture Do’s and Don’ts

Posted in Dentures

It’s easy to slack off when it comes to proper denture use and care. Hey, we all need reminders from time to time, and especially when we get into bad habits. Denture care is no exception. Keep your mouth healthy and your denture strong for as long as possible with these simple tips.

DO soak your denture anytime it’s not in use to prevent stain and keep it moist.

DON’T ever soak your denture in bleach to attempt lightening tooth color!

DO clean your denture with a denture brush to remove debris daily.

DON’T use any household tools to attempt to chip away tartar or stain.

DO use warm water with an effervescent denture cleaner tablet.

DON’T place your denture in hot water which can warp the acrylic.

DO use a denture adhesive to enhance the security of the fit.

DON’T use a denture adhesive to compensate for an ill-fitting denture.

DO use a gentle hand soap or dish liquid to cleanse your denture, if needed.

DON’T reach for any abrasive household scrubbing products!

DO give your gums time to “breathe” each day.

DON’T sleep in your denture since this promotes infection and dry mouth.

DO clean your mouth and gums daily with gauze or a soft toothbrush.

DON’T ever attempt to clean your dentures with denture chemicals while wearing them.

To make sure your denture is still fitting comfortably and that your current denture care routine is working, see your local dentist. Your dentist will also keep you updated on any changes in the tissues of your mouth.

Don’t procrastinate – do schedule your visit today!

Posted on behalf of:
ABQ Dentures
2010 Wyoming Blvd NE
Albuquerque, NM 87112
(505) 933-7794

Sep
27

The Best Possible Denture Cleaning Routine

Posted in Dentures

Regular denture maintenance is key to keeping your oral appliance functional and comfortable. You can minimize costly accidents, repairs, and treatments associated with dental health by making sure your denture is always as clean as possible.

Here’s what you can do to keep your denture comfortable, beautiful, and strong:

Rinse after eating – every time.

Don’t wait until it’s time to scrub your dentures. You should give them a brief rinse every time you eat. This is especially important after eating foods that could leave deep stains on your denture.

Clean your mouth.

A clean denture in itself isn’t enough. Germs and food debris left in your mouth can transfer back to your denture. Carefully brush and floss remaining teeth daily. If there are no teeth left, remember to clean your tongue, wipe your gums, and freshen up with a rinse before putting your false teeth back in place.

Brush your denture.

Just dunking your hands in water is no way to wash them. Similarly, your denture needs more than a quick rinse. Scrub your denture at least daily with a soft denture-safe brush. This will minimize stain and tartar.

Soak your denture.

When not in use, especially overnight, your denture needs to soak in a denture solution or plain water. The acrylic will stay supple and you’ll maintain the proper-fitting shape longer.

Handle with care.

It’s easy to drop a slippery and delicate denture while trying to clean it. When handling your appliance, avoid pressing on metal parts or scrubbing hard. Always clean it over a surface cushioned with a towel.

For more tips on extending the life and function of your denture, contact your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Short Pump Family Dentistry
201 Towne Center West Blvd
Suite 709
Richmond, VA 23233
804-332-5505

Sep
22

Dentures: How They’re Made

Posted in Dentures

Wondering how people get such realistic-looking “false teeth?”

Long gone are the days of using outdated materials or even natural wood/bone as they did in centuries prior to ours. Today’s denture process results in smiles that are as beautiful as they are functional.

Measuring Your Mouth

The first step in denture fabrication is determining your mouth’s shape so that a denture is the right size. A dentist starts by taking an impression with a putty material. Once the impression sets, it serves as the base for creating a cast model.

Stone models are then set up on an articulator, or frame, which helps the denture designers to determine at which point the teeth should meet.

Creating the Denture

Typically, the dentist sends the models and measurements to a dental lab for designing the actual denture. Some dentists are able to do it themselves.

Either way, the next step is placing wax over the model’s “gums.” Then, false teeth selected to match the shape you want are placed into the wax wherever teeth are needed.

Once the whole layout looks correct, the model gets put in liquid stone which holds the teeth in place when it hardens. After that sets, the wax in the model is boiled away and acrylic is poured in, to fill out the gums and palate.

The denture comes out ready for try-on.

Interested in a Denture?

Dentures are great substitutes for teeth that have been lost to decay, trauma, or gum disease.

But having a quality denture made can take a little time, what with all the adjusting and sending back-and-forth. Your new teeth could take around five separate appointments to have made.

So if you’re thinking about getting a denture, then contact your dentist soon to set up a consultation.

Posted on behalf of:
Marvin Village Dentistry
8161 Ardrey Kell Road
Suite 101
Charlotte, NC 28277
(704) 579-5513

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