Dental Tips Blog

Oct
8

3 Signs You Will Probably Need a Root Canal

Posted in Root Canals

A root canal is a procedure in which a dentist empties a tooth of bacteria and a dying nerve. Doing so heads off a potentially dangerous infection, relieves pain, and saves your tooth to avoid an extraction.

If you notice any of the following problems with your teeth, there’s a possibility you might need a root canal:

  1. Discoloration

A dark-colored tooth can indicate that there is nerve damage on the inside. Darkening could be a result of either trauma or decay. Some teeth change color after an injury but don’t always need root canal treatment. If your tooth starts to turn gray or brown, it’s a good idea to get it checked out.

  1. Swelling/Pus

When a tooth’s nerve starts to break down, the infection will try to escape the tooth. The only way out is through the channel that leads out the root tip. The infection then invades the surrounding bone tissue and eats away a small hole. As a result, you can end up with an oozing abscess on your gums near the tip of your root.

  1. Temperature And Pressure Sensitivity

If you have one tooth in particular that you can’t even chew on, then its nerve could be in jeopardy. An infection inside the tooth will put a lot of pressure on it from the inside, making it extremely sensitive.

See your dentist anytime you suspect something is off. But a dangerous nerve problem can crop up painlessly. That’s why it’s so important that you visit your dentist on a regular basis. This is how you stay on top of dental problems and anticipate the need for treatment such as root canals.

Posted on behalf of:
Greencastle Dental
195 Greencastle Road
Tyrone, GA 30290
(770) 486-5585

Jan
30

Root Canal Therapy – What Is It?

Posted in Root Canals

A “root canal” affects the inside of your tooth’s root, which contains a channel of nerves and blood supply.

When a cavity or fracture gets too deep, this can trigger an infection in the pulp of your tooth. The bacteria travel down the canal to escape the tooth, resulting in an abscess along the tip of the root.

At this point, your tooth can never be completely clean and strong on its own. Your dentist will recommend root canal therapy (RCT) to remove the infection and seal off the nerve chamber.

What to Expect From a Root Canal Procedure

Your dentist will first take an x-ray to determine the extent of the cavity. After careful treatment planning, the dentist will administer anesthesia and open up a small hole through the top of your tooth. He or she will use a file to reach as deep into the root to remove infected tissues.

The next step is cleaning and shaping the root canal with special tools and irrigators. Once that’s done, it’s time to pack the empty spaces with a filling material that helps guard against the roots developing another infection.

Finally, your tooth will need a crown to protect it, as the loss of the nerve can weaken its structure.

Does RCT Hurt?

You might be surprised to learn that having a root canal doesn’t hurt any more than getting a filling.

Sure, root canals come with a reputation for pain, but the untreated infection is one of the biggest reasons why. You now have access to multiple options and medication for making your dental procedures as comfortable as you please.

Do you suspect you need root canal therapy? Contact your dentist for more information and to schedule an evaluation.

Posted on behalf of:
Nautical Dental
16414 San Pedro Ave #200
San Antonio, TX 78232
(210) 499-0009

Nov
20

Signs and Symptoms of a Dying Tooth

Posted in Root Canals

One of the primary goals of routine dental care is to restore your natural tooth to a state of health and function before a cavity has the chance to permanently compromise it. Sometimes, decay can spread rapidly and grow too big for it to be fixed with a filling alone. How do you know if your tooth is beyond saving with a filling?

Signs and Symptoms of a Serious Problem

When decay spreads too far through the tooth’s hard outer layers, it can reach the sensitive core, which contains nerves and blood vessels. The infection spreads through the roots of the teeth and can result in an abscess. Signs and symptoms you may notice include:

  • Pain
  • Bad Odor or Taste
  • Swelling of Your Cheek or Jaw
  • Darkness or Discoloration of the Tooth
  • A Pus-filled Pimple on the Gums

Take Action to Save Your Tooth

The surest way you’ll be able to enjoy the use of your tooth once more is to have a root canal. By carefully examining the tooth and taking an x-ray of the area, your dentist will be able to assess the extent of the damage. Because the decay has advanced so far, the nerves within the tooth must be removed. The roots of the tooth are then sealed up and the tooth is reinforced with a crown. This procedure allows you to retain your natural tooth, but it removes all sensation from the tooth because the living material has been taken away.

If you are struggling with a “problem tooth” at this time, then please contact your dentist as soon as possible so that he or she can help relieve your tooth discomfort!

Posted on behalf of:
Touchstone Dentistry
2441 FM 646 W Suite A
Dickinson, TX 77539
(832) 769-5202

Nov
7

What You Need to Know About Root Canals and Antibiotics

Posted in Root Canals

It is vital to see your dentist if you develop an abscess in your tooth or surrounding gum tissue. If a tooth breaks or dental infection has reached the pulp (central part) of the tooth, a root canal may be necessary. If infection is present, the dentist will start the patient on an antibiotic regimen before any treatment begins.

Below are five reasons to start this antibiotic treatment as soon as possible.

  1. Numbing. The dentist will not be able to numb the tooth and gum if inflammation is present.
  2. Fistula. If left untreated, this infection could cause a fistula to form. A fistula is an opening on the gum that develops from chronic abscesses. This opening allows pus to drain from the infected tooth. As the infection drains, pain will usually subside for a short time, but the infection remains.
  3. Bacterial endocarditis. As the infection moves through the body, blood vessels could deposit bacteria into the heart. This could result in fatal consequences.
  4. Sinus infections. Roots of the upper molars are located near the sinuses. Infection from the tooth can cause pus to build up in the sinus cavity.
  5. Tooth loss. If left untreated, the abscess could penetrate the alveolar bone. The alveolar bone is the mineralized tissue contained in the jaw in which teeth are embedded. Over time, the bone loss would cause the tooth to loosen and the tooth eventually would fall out.

It is imperative to contact your dentist within two days of starting antibiotic treatment if pain and gum swelling have not started to subside. It is also important to continue taking the medication prescribed until it is gone, even if the pain and swelling subsides.

Your dentist may or may not perform the necessary root canal therapy. Usually, the dentist will contact an endodontist (a dentist who specializes in root canals) and will forward x-rays and chart notes.

Posted on behalf of Toothmasters

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