Dental Tips Blog

Oct
9

What Is the Core Buildup of a Dental Crown?

Posted in Crowns

A dental crown is a hollow cap that’s shaped like a tooth. Inside, it’s got an empty space that fits right over the top of a tooth. So in order to support a crown, teeth have to be trimmed to the right shape. Otherwise, the crown would be too bulky.

When You Need More Than A Crown

On occasion, a tooth might be too damaged by decay or fracture to support a crown. It might have lost a lot of structure to large old fillings. In order to keep the tooth strong, your dentist may do what’s called a “core buildup.”

As it sounds, a core buildup reinforces that center foundation of the tooth which seats the finished crown. Your dentist will use restorative materials to mold this new core which will be the same size and shape that your tooth would be naturally.

What If A Core Buildup Isn’t Enough?

Your dentist might then take things a step further and use a post to help secure the material to the tooth. This ensures a stable foundation to support your dental crown.

A core and post won’t necessarily guarantee a stronger tooth, however. All the extra material placed in your tooth can weaken it. But the post and core may buy you a little more time with your tooth before it is ultimately extracted.

Do You Need A Post And Core?

If it seems too risky to attempt a core buildup, extraction may be your only option. It all depends on the quality of the tooth structure you have left. Professional dental x-rays are the best way to determine this. Talk with your dentist about your restoration options.

Posted on behalf of:
Columbia Dental Center
915 N Main St #2
Columbia, IL 62236
(618) 281-6161

Oct
8

Should You Get a Crown or a Filling?

Posted in Crowns

You’ve noticed a suspicious dark spot on your tooth and now you’re wondering what you should do about it. If that’s actually a cavity, then it will need some kind of treatment.

Two of the most common methods for repairing tooth decay are fillings and dental crowns. Which will you need?

How Traditional Fillings Work

A filling is a flowable material placed inside a hollowed out space in the tooth. It’s usually light-cured and sets up in a matter of minutes. Fillings are your first line of defense in repairing cavities.

What Makes A Crown Different?

A crown, or cap, is a solid piece of material like porcelain that covers your entire tooth. If a lot of your tooth is damaged from decay, a crown can restore its shape.

Deciding Which Restoration You Need

Which restoration you need depends mainly on how much of your tooth is affected. If the cavity isn’t too deep, a filling is usually enough. But if the decay has reached deeper layers of your tooth or has caused large pieces to chip away, then you’ll need the extra protection of a crown.

What if the damage to your tooth falls somewhere in-between?

Your dentist may recommend a hybrid restoration called an indirect filling (inlay/onlay.) It’s like a filling-crown combo created outside the mouth and then cemented into the tooth like a piece in a puzzle.

It’s impossible to figure out exactly what your tooth needs without having a professional examine it. Call your dentist today to schedule an exam. He or she will help you decide on the restoration that matches your needs.

Posted on behalf of:
Seven Hills Dentistry
1305 Cedarcrest Rd #115
Dallas, GA 30132
(678) 257-7117

Aug
29

What Are Temporary Crowns Made Of?

Posted in Crowns

Planning to get your first dental crown? You’re probably a little anxious about what to expect. You’ve heard that you’ll need to wear a temporary for a couple weeks.

Will anyone notice?

What if it comes off?

What does it look like?

These and many other questions are rattling around in your mind!

Why You Need A Temporary

If your dentist were to just put a cap over your tooth as is, it couldn’t fit. Even if it did, your teeth would be sore and you wouldn’t be able to bite properly. Additionally, any decay and damaged parts of your tooth have to come out first to keep your tooth healthy.

This is why your dentist will trim your tooth to receive a customized crown. But doing so leaves your tooth sensitive and susceptible to fractures. Your permanent crown takes a little time to create, so your tooth will just have to wear something else, in the meantime.

Getting A Temporary Crown

Your dentist will have some dental crowns on-hand and ready to go at the time your tooth is prepped. He or she should be able to shape it a bit and maybe even adjust the color to look like your old tooth.

Your final restoration will be a much closer match in terms of look and feel. But the temporary crown will get the job done. Your dentist will use a temporary cement so that it can easily be popped off when you come back for the permanent one.

In the meantime, avoid eating chewy or crunchy foods on your temporary to keep it in place. Your dentist will let you know what else to do to keep your tooth safe!

Posted on behalf of:
Spanaway Family Dentistry
20709 Mountain Hwy E #101
Spanaway, WA 98387
(253) 948-0880

Jun
20

Why You Should Get a Crown: 4 Reasons

Posted in Crowns

No one really ever wants to get another dental crown. But there are some good reasons why you should seriously consider your dentist’s recommendation.

  1. Give Your Tooth A Few More Years

Crowning a tooth buys you more time than a filling would. This is especially true if you have a deep cavity. Getting a filling could be a real gamble – you don’t know for sure if it will keep the decay out. A dental crown, on the other hand, is a much neater and more complete solution. It could even allow you to put off the need for a root canal.

  1. Change Your Smile’s Entire Look

Sometimes, a crown is simply a good way to change the look of a front tooth that is:

  • Deeply stained
  • Misshapen
  • Chipped
  • Rough-textured

It’s usually a great idea to just crown a tooth with extensive cosmetic damage.

  1. Prevent Wear From Grinding And Clenching

A habit of grinding and clenching your teeth at night is a sure way to wear down tooth enamel. Crowning a tooth or two might be the best way you can prevent severe fractures.

It’s also a good idea to look into devices (such as splints or night guards) that will prevent your grinding tendency from damaging teeth and restorations.

  1. Fill In An Empty Space

How does a crown do that?

Crowning a couple otherwise healthy teeth could allow you to connect the gap between them with a dental bridge. That’s because these dental crowns play a key role in supporting fixed each end of a bridge.

How else can a crown benefit your smile and dental health in general? Ask your dentist by scheduling a visit.

Posted on behalf of:
Meadowbrook Family Dental
8848 Calvine Rd #120
Elk Grove, CA 95828
(916) 912-4126

May
25

Are You Paying Too Much for Your Dental Crown?

Posted in Crowns

You were quite proud of your lovely new crown. . . until a friend from across the country told you they paid a fraction of what you did for their own restoration.

What’s going on here? Is this dental extortion?

There are a lot of different factors affecting the cost of a crown.

Geographic Location

Prices at a particular practice are set based on the needs of that office. In the local economy, dental materials, lab services, utilities, and rent could be very steep. That will affect how high the dentist has to price his or her dental crowns.

If you need to find something that suits your budget a little better, it doesn’t hurt to shop around at offices outside of where you live.

Location in Your Mouth

Did you need to cap a front tooth that shows when you smile? Was your crown restoring a back molar? Crowning a dental implant?

The kind of support your tooth needs determines which type of dental crown you need. There is no one-size-fits-all crown.

More Than a Crown

You’re not responsible for just the cost of the crown, alone. As with any other procedure, you’ll have the quoted price and then the total price which adds in all the lab fees, exam fees, diagnostic fees, and such.

How Much Should You Pay?

Fees without insurance vary widely, but rough averages for here in the United States when you’re paying out of pocket usually cost around the following amounts:

  • Porcelain – $1,400
  • Porcelain-fused-to-metal – $1,000
  • Metal – $1,300

Insurance benefits could help out a lot in defraying costs. Even if you don’t have insurance, ask your dental office about any savings options or provisions for financing your treatment.

Posted on behalf of:
Touchstone Dentistry
2441 FM 646 W Suite A
Dickinson, TX 77539
(832) 769-5202

Apr
15

Caring for Your Dental Crown: Three Tips

Posted in Crowns

Your new crown looks so pristine. It was a good piece of work, too! After waiting patiently in the dental office, the finished product is here and you want to help it last for as long as possible.

Here’s what you need to do to make sure your crown stays in great shape:

  1. Brush and Floss Daily

Yes, your new cap has completely restored all the damage done to your tooth. But that’s hardly the end of the road. The edge of your crown where it meets your tooth is a vulnerable area that can still develop a cavity.

Besides this, your dental crown can still host some bacteria that irritate gum tissue and lead to problems such as gingivitis and periodontitis.

That’s why it’s so important to brush twice a day and carefully floss around your crown every day, too. Take note – flossing will not cause a healthy crown to fall off! If flossing is challenging, you may find that a water flosser is a good way to clean around it instead.

  1. No Hard Crunchy Foods

Just because your tooth looks and feels stronger with its new crown doesn’t mean it is tougher than your natural teeth. A habit of chewing on ice or other hard objects can quickly wear down a porcelain crown or even fracture it.

  1. Avoid Bruxism

Do you have the habit of grinding your teeth when you sleep, also known as bruxism?

Your dentist can place an extra strong type of crown to avoid wear. It might be a good idea to invest in a night guard to protect your other teeth as well.

Talk with your dentist about other ways you can get the most out of your new restoration.

Posted on behalf of:
Lakewood Dental Trails
10252 W Adams Ave
Temple, TX 76502
(254) 434-4035

Feb
14

4 Questions to Ask Your Dentist About Your New Dental Crown

Posted in Crowns

Evidence of the earliest dental crowns dates back to around 700 B.C. in Europe. In the past century, the art of crafting caps that fit comfortably has improved considerably.

If you need a crown today, you can be sure that you’re getting a sanitary and safe restoration. Before having treatment done, however, make sure that you and your dentist are on the same page by getting answers to these questions.

  1. How Much Will My Crown Cost?

A crown can cost anywhere from several hundred to a couple thousand dollars. What you pay is determined by things like:

  • Materials used
  • Location of the office
  • How much your insurance covers
  1. Is Anything Covered By Insurance?

Your insurance benefits are determined by you or your employer. It’s good to familiarize yourself with the benefits you have available. Many insurances today will cover a single crown procedure for a tooth once every five years. Most dental crowns last far longer than that. Your dental office will help you understand your dental insurance policy.

  1. Are There Any Alternatives to a Crown?

If your tooth can support a more conservative restoration, then an onlay may be a good option. In some cases, it may be too risky to attempt a crown and the better route is to extract the tooth. Ask your dentist why he or she recommends a crown above other treatment alternatives.

  1. Which Type of Crown is Best for Me?

Crowns come in different materials such as:

  • Gold
  • Porcelain
  • Porcelain/metal combinations

Which one you should have depends on how much bite force the crowned tooth will experience and how well you want it to blend in with your smile.

Also ask your dentist about how to make your crown last.

Posted on behalf of:
Grateful Dental
2000 Powers Ferry Rd SE #1
Marietta, GA 30067
(678) 593-2979

Jan
10

Why a Dental Crown is NOT the End of the Road!

Posted in Crowns

Once a tooth is crowned, it might feel invincible. When the entire visible part of the tooth is covered up with a porcelain or metal cap, it’s easy to think it’s safe from the threat of decay.

In actuality, your tooth may be more at risk than before.

The Truth About Crowns

Even though a dental crown is one of the best things you can give your teeth, it’s no secret that it won’t last forever. No restoration can do that. All it can do is extend the life of your tooth. With time and wear, even a crown will need to be updated.

The crown appears to cover tooth, but it only does so until slightly below the gum line. If bacteria set up camp near the edge of the crown, a cavity can start at that piece of exposed root.

What makes this worse is the fact that you won’t know what’s going on. the cavity will spread unseen, hidden under the crown. Next thing you know, it’s time for a new crown, or even a root canal.

Make Your Crown Last

Who knows? Perhaps one day we will have restorations that last forever. In the meantime, you can do your part in making your crown last for 10, 15 years or more.

Dental caps will serve you well as long as you treat them right. Keep them clean with regular brushing and flossing. You still have to pay close attention to what you eat. Eating sugary and acidic foods frequently will take a toll even on teeth that are already crowned.

Schedule regular dental visits (and x-rays) to make sure that your crowns stay in great shape.

Posted on behalf of:
Meadowbrook Family Dental
8848 Calvine Rd #120
Elk Grove, CA 95828
(916) 912-4126

Jan
9

How Long Can You Wait on Getting a Dental Crown?

Posted in Crowns

You probably don’t have a new crown placed on the very day you’re told you need one. The time and investment needed for a new restoration often require that you postpone treatment until a more convenient time.

How long can you safely put it off?

Think About Why You Need a Crown

One of the first considerations is the reason for getting the crown. Some teeth can wait, some can’t.

Teeth that might be able to hang in there a while include:

  • Existing old metal crowns that you want to update with white ones
  • Teeth that need a crown for cosmetic reasons
  • A tooth slowly wearing away from a teeth-grinding habit

With issues like these, you might be able to plan treatment around next year’s tax return or summer vacation.

Other teeth, however, are a ticking time-bomb:

  • Extensive cavities
  • A failed existing crown
  • Large fractures
  • Failing, large fillings

No matter what, DO NOT attempt a self-diagnosis! A dentist who personally examines your tooth is the only one who can tell you how urgently you need a dental crown. Waiting too long simply because you feel it’s okay is inviting disaster. When in doubt, get a second opinion.

Get a Crown When You Need It

Familiarize yourself with your insurance plan. This way, you’ll have a good idea of your coverage and price range as well as the best time to schedule treatment. Take advantage of the payment plans in the dental office. Seize the nearest opportunity to get your tooth crowned. Don’t make the mistake of assuming that another will come along when you need it!

Do you need a crown or suspect that you might? Contact your dentist to schedule an examination.

Posted on behalf of:
Hudson Oaks Family Dentistry
200 S Oakridge Dr #106
Hudson Oaks, TX 76087
(817) 857-6790

Jan
8

What Happens Before You Cap a Tooth?

Posted in Crowns

“Capping” a tooth is a little more involved than slipping a metal or porcelain cover over the top of it. Here’s what goes on behind the scenes to prepare your tooth for a dental crown:

Treatment Planning

No treatment is any good unless it’s based on accurate and current x-rays. Your dentist needs an x-ray or two of the tooth in order to see just how much damage is there.

In the planning phase, you and your dentist will talk about how the crown should fit. You’ll also consider these questions before selecting a dental cap: Do you grind your teeth? Will the crown support a bridge? Do you prefer a metal or white restoration?

The Preparation

When the planning is all done, your dentist will schedule an appointment to prep your tooth. This is when he or she trims away the damaged part of the structure. Next, a scan or mold is taken of what’s left, and use to record and design the new crown.

You’ll probably get a temporary cap to wear while you wait on the final product. When it arrives, the crown gets cemented into placed and checked for a secure and comfortable fit.

What You Should Do

A dental crown could save your smile. If you notice things in your tooth like:

  • A fracture or large chip
  • A large cavity
  • Unusual sensitivity
  • Pain

Then you should schedule a visit to your dentist. It’s never safe to conclude that you’ll only need a filling! To find out for sure whether or not your tooth needs treatment, you’ll need a dental professional’s opinion. Call your dentist to see if a crown is the answer.

Posted on behalf of:
Gwinnett Family Dental Care
3455 Lawrenceville Hwy
Lawrenceville, GA 30044
(770) 921-1115

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