Dental Tips Blog

Aug
12

Thinking Of Getting a Gold Dental Crown?

Posted in Crowns

Dental crowns are often used to improve the appearance of teeth that have become chipped, cracked or discolored, either from injury or decay. A dental crown is also used to restore the strength and structure to a tooth following a root canal procedure, or to replace missing teeth with the application of a crown over an implant. Crowns can be manufactured from several different materials, each varying in durability or cosmetic appeal. Crowns made from metal are the strongest and longer lasting option available; of which, gold is certainly one.

Why choose gold? Gold is non-toxic, non-corrosive and hypo-allergenic. Gold crowns will not break or chip, even when polished. The greatest advantage of getting a gold crown is its longevity. Gold crowns will outlast those made with other materials at least three to five times longer. You can count on your gold crown to literally last for decades, which may be more cost effective than having to replace crowns of lesser durability.

Since gold is a high noble metal (as opposed to nickel or tin), there is less expansion or contraction with heat and cold, so the fit remains tightly sealed. Of course, the drawback on choosing gold as the metal for your crown is the lack of aesthetic appeal. In this case, you are choosing between having a gold tooth, or having a tooth that is natural in appearance. Therefore, many choose to have gold crowns placed only in less visible locations where a stronger tooth structure is more necessary (back molars).

Gold crowns are a good choice for many situations, but in some cases a porcelain tooth colored crown may be a better choice especially if the crown will be visible.  Your Cumming Dentist can help you choose the best dental crown material for your situation.

Posted on behalf of Nukoa Family Dentistry

Google

 

Most Popular

Tori, Exostosis, and Extra Bone Formation in the Mouth

A fairly common occurrence in the mouth is the existence of extra bone development along the outside or inside of the jawline near the teeth, or in the roof of…

Difference Between Conscious and Unconscious Sedation

Sedation dentistry is a wonderful option for many people who would not or cannot tolerate dentistry in a traditional dental setting.   Many people have a fear of visiting the dentist,…

Lingual Frenectomy versus Lingual Frenuloplasty

Lingual frenectomy and lingual frenuloplasty are both dental procedures used to correct a condition called ankyloglossia. Ankylogloassia, more commonly known as ‘tied tongue’, is an abnormality of the lingual frenulum….