Dental Tips Blog

Sep
27

What Are Dental Posts and Cores?

Posted in Crowns

Restorative dentistry has a large vocabulary. It’s easy to get confused about the differences between posts, cores, root canals, crowns, and so on.

How do posts and cores relate to crowns?

Get A Grip!

Crowns replace a tooth’s outer layer if it’s been damaged by decay or fracture. Caps take things a step further when a filling is insufficient.

But what happens when even a crown isn’t quite enough?

Dental crowns depend on a tooth having a solid core for support. Without a core, there’s not much for the cap to hold onto.

An artificial core is often made of a similar material as white dental fillings. Your dentist molds it into the tooth to create a new foundation for supporting the crown. This core is typically secured with small pins to help it hold onto the existing tooth.

Posts to Stabilize the Core

Your dentist will call on the help of a dental post if more than half of the natural crown (upper portion) of your tooth is missing, and the core needs more support to stay on the tooth.

At this point, your tooth should already have had a root canal. Posts cannot be placed in teeth without endodontic treatment. The dentist must drill down into the nerve chamber of the tooth to create a hole for placing the post. You don’t want this done on a live nerve!

After the root canal is completed, a dentist places a sturdy metal plug in the excavated area. Then, the core material is packed around it and a crown seals off the whole thing.

Talk with your dentist to learn which restorative techniques are right for saving your tooth.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Smiles Dentistry
2655 Dallas Highway Suite 510
Marietta, GA 30064
770.422.8776

Aug
30

Do You Need a Crown If You Chipped a Front Tooth?

Posted in Crowns

Front teeth can fracture quite easily. Sometimes, it’s blunt trauma to the face from a car accident or a football. In other cases, the enamel was already weak and a piece snapped off when someone went to bite into a burger.

However it happened to you, you’re now concerned with making it look like a whole tooth again before someone gives you an unpleasant nickname.

Your dentist will give you a few treatment options and help you decide on the one that will save your tooth for as long as possible.

Treatment Options For Chipped Teeth

Dental bonding and veneers are just as common as crowns for repairing nicks in the enamel. In fact, your dentist may feel that your case merits the most conservative option possible.

A very minor procedure with bonding (which usually doesn’t even require anesthesia) won’t take away much more tooth structure. Veneers are a little more invasive, but they provide more complete protection.

When To Get A Crown

A lot of structural loss in the tooth usually merits getting a full dental crown. Not only can it completely patch up your tooth, but it will protect it from decay and bite pressure.

How Bad Is It?

Whichever treatment you get will simply be determined by the extent of the fracture. If it was deep and involved the nerve chamber, you may even need a root canal.

But the next time a chipped-tooth emergency arises in your life, don’t panic! Call your local dentist who will see you as soon as possible. You won’t leave the office without something on your tooth!

Posted on behalf of:
Heritage Dental
23945 Franz Rd Suite A
Katy, TX 77493
(832) 709-2429

Jul
17

Make Your Teeth Strong and Beautiful!

Posted in Crowns

Sick of seeing those brittle, chipped, or deeply stained teeth in the mirror? Dental crowns could be your secret to a more beautiful and stronger smile.

How A Crown Could Improve Your Smile

If you have a tooth with severe decay or a deep fracture, then a filling might not be enough to patch it up. That’s where a crown comes in.

A crown replaces the outermost layer of enamel and covers all visible surfaces of your tooth. Made of gorgeous, durable materials like porcelain and ceramic, today’s crowns look just like natural teeth.

Your crown doesn’t just protect your damaged tooth. It also reinforces the tooth so that you can keep using it for as long as possible. Additionally, crowns are a great way to close the gaps between teeth and cover up other hard-to-fix imperfections.

Is A Crown Right For You?

If your tooth has only shallow aesthetic flaws, then a dental veneer may be enough to give it a face-lift.

The only way to find out for sure whether you need a crown is to have your dentist examine your tooth. Using x-rays and other diagnostic techniques, he or she will evaluate the amount and integrity of the tooth structure you have.

A crown often ends up being the best long-term cosmetic solution.

Your days of suffering with weak teeth or an unsightly smile are almost over! If you’re ready for a change, then the first step is only one dental consultation away.

Call your local dentist to schedule a visit where you’ll find out which restorative option will help your tooth the most.

Posted on behalf of:
Sycamore Hills Dentistry
10082 Illinois Rd
Fort Wayne, IN 46804
(260) 213-4400

Apr
17

What Can You Eat with a Dental Crown?

Posted in Crowns

You want to protect your new dental crown and make sure it lasts you many years. But neither do you want to give up your favorite goodies. With a few precautions, you can continue eating with dental crown as you normally do.

Eating with a Temporary Cap

Temporary crowns are made of plastic and do not fit like permanent restorations. They just protect your tooth until the final crown is ready. You should avoid letting crunchy or chewy foods get near your temporary crown. It’s not the end of the world, but it is annoying if it does come off.

Foods to Avoid with a New Crown

Don’t eat or drink for about 30 minutes after getting your permanent crown. This helps the cement to set firmly. Stay away from hard or sticky foods for the first 24 hours.

Watch your sugar intake – your crowned tooth is still just as prone to getting cavities.

Be very cautious about using a crowned front tooth to bite into tough foods. Sandwiches are fine, but whole apples, corn-on-the-cob, and biting meat off BBQ ribs could put jeopardize your tooth. A crowned tooth will never be as strong as a natural one, so you do need to be careful.

What About Staining Foods?

Your new crown shouldn’t pick up too much stain. The issue though is that it can’t get any lighter in color. It’s made to match your other teeth at the time your dentist places it. If you ever want to bleach your teeth, you can’t expect the crown to lighten as well.

Still have some more questions about your new crown? Contact your dentist before the procedure to find out more.

Posted on behalf of:
Springfield Lorton Dental Group
5419-C Backlick Rd
Springfield, VA 22151
(703) 256-8554

Nov
30

The Dental Crown Process

Posted in Crowns

If you’ve never had a crown until now, then you’re probably wondering what to expect. Dental crown placement is a very routine procedure. It’s a very safe process, and with attention to detail your dentist can make your treatment a success.

What Is a Dental Crown?

A dental crown replaces the outer layer of a tooth. The damaged portion of the tooth is removed and replaced with a strong solid piece of material such as porcelain or gold.

A crown restores the shape and strength of your tooth so that you can have a healthy bite. There’s nothing as good as retaining your natural tooth, so it’s worth the effort to save it!

Before Prepping the Tooth

Updated x-rays and a dental exam will help you determine what happened to tooth, how extensive the damage is, and whether the root or nerve chamber was damaged at all. The treatment plan considers how many teeth need crowns and what each tooth needs.

Receiving Your Crown

When it’s time to work on your tooth, the area round it will be thoroughly numbed. The decayed or fractured part of the tooth is carefully removed and the healthy enamel is reshaped. After that, your dentist will take an impression and/or scan of the prepared and neighboring teeth.

Next, you’ll get a temporary cap to protect your tooth while you wait for a lab to finish designing your permanent crown. A few weeks later, the dentist will take off the temporary crown and cement the permanent one in place. Bite tests and x-rays are taken to ensure that your treatment was successful.

Think you might need a crown? If you have a tooth that’s bothering you, contact your dentist to schedule an exam.

Posted on behalf of:
Gastonia Family Dentistry
2557 Pembroke Rd
Gastonia, NC 28054
(704) 854-8887

Sep
18

4 Signs You Probably Need a Dental Crown

Posted in Crowns

Most people don’t like hearing that they need to have a dental crown placed. The good thing though, is that a crown could end up saving your tooth! If you notice one of the following signs in your own tooth, then at least it won’t come as a shock if your dentist suggests a dental crown.

1 – A large fracture.

A very large chip in a tooth likely can’t be patched up with filling material. A crown will provide more structural support and protect the tooth’s delicate nerve chamber.

2 – Increasing sensitivity around a large and/or old filling.

This could be a sign that the filling has pulled away from the tooth a bit. This would lead to some sensitivity, especially if a new cavity has developed under the filling. Only a crown could sufficiently repair the damage.

3 – A large cavity.

A very large cavity that has eaten away much of the tooth is almost a giveaway that at least a crown is needed. Possibly a root canal, too!

4 – Your tooth looks like it’s getting flatter.

If you have a chronic habit of grinding your teeth, then your molars will show it. The force of grinding wears them down, putting them at risk for things like sensitivity, recession, and fracture. A crown will protect your tooth from these side effects.

Not sure where your tooth is at?

That’s okay – your dentist will be able to make the best diagnosis. Visit your dentist as soon as possible to begin treatment for your tooth. The sooner you do, the greater the chance that you may not need a crown, after all!

Posted on behalf of:
Family First Dental
419 N Yelm St
Kennewick, WA 99336
(509) 783-1000

Aug
9

5 Frequently Asked Questions About Dental Crowns

Posted in Crowns

Dental crowns can seem like an overwhelming process if you’ve never had one. Looking over the following information can help feel a lot better when your dentist recommends repairing your tooth with a crown.

  1. What is a Dental Crown?

A crown is a strong and protective “cap” that replaces the visible outer portion of a tooth. A tooth that has experienced a lot of fracture, wear, or decay can be saved with a dental crown. The damaged material is trimmed away and a custom-designed cover replaces it.

  1. Can’t the Tooth Be Filled Instead?

If there is too much filling material in relation to tooth structure, the tooth can be compromised. A large filling is more of a patch job that puts the tooth at risk of future fractures. A crown protects a tooth completely.

  1. Does the Crown Have to Be Metal?

No! Most crowns these days are made from porcelain or ceramic for a natural-look. These materials will also give your tooth strength.

  1. Do I Have to Have A Root Canal, As Well?

A tooth needs a root canal when the nerve chamber is damaged. If only the outer part of the tooth is involved, it should only need a crown. On the other hand, just about every tooth with a root canal will also need to be crowned.

  1. How Long Does a Crown Last?

With proper care and maintenance, you’re looking at spending 10-15 years with your crown. Some have lasted even longer than that.

A dental crown is a good way to protect your tooth! The sooner you get your tooth restored with a crown, the longer you get to hold onto it. See your dentist for more information.

Posted on behalf of:
Gilreath Dental Associates
200 White St NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 514-1224

Jun
26

4 Reasons to Get a Dental Crown

Posted in Crowns

For many people, the phrase “dental crown” is almost synonymous with “pain” or “debt.” In all reality, though, a dental crown is the total opposite of a death sentence! Consider a few reasons why your dentist may recommend that you have a dental crown.

1. Its Stronger Than a Filling.

There is a point at which your tooth is no longer structurally sound after being damaged by decay or injury. If enough of your tooth is fractured, then a filling won’t be strong enough to keep it in one piece. A severely fractured tooth is harder to restore and may need to be extracted. A dental crown helps hold together what is left of your tooth enamel.

2. Aesthetic Benefits.

Fillings are not always pretty! Even when you choose to have tooth-colored fillings placed, these can pick up staining around the edges over time. A porcelain or ceramic crown, on the other hand, doesn’t stain. It will stay beautiful for as long as you want it to. A crown is a durable and pristine cosmetic choice for heavily chipped and stained front teeth.

3. Less Sensitivity.

Advanced tooth decay and large fillings are often accompanied by sensitivity. A crown will protect more surface area on your tooth. After a short period of adjustment, your tooth will likely feel less sensitive with a crown than it would with a large filling.

4. It Can Save Your Tooth!

A crown may be your best option for halting decay and replacing the support your tooth has lost. A crown now could spare you a root canal or extraction next year. There is no replacement that quite equals your natural tooth!

Talk with your local dentist to find out why a dental crown is right for you!

Posted on behalf of:
Frederick Dental
805 S Broadway, Suite 210
Boulder, CO 80305
(303) 442-4846

Jun
22

When A Crown is Better Than a Filling

Posted in Crowns

A dental filling replaces only a small portion of tooth, while a crown replaces the entire outer part of the tooth. Given the choice, you might prefer to go with the more conservative option of a filling.

But after considering the benefits of a crown, you’ll likely agree that it’s worth having to save your tooth!

What Your Tooth Needs

When recommending restorative treatment, a dentist carefully considers what your tooth is able to handle. Your tooth is not made up of a single material. It actually has complex layers surrounding a delicate and sensitive nerve chamber.

The more natural tooth structure is removed to hold a filling, the weaker your tooth becomes. A particularly large filling may have to be replaced time and again, and each time requiring more tooth structure to be removed. The larger the filling, the greater the chance that your tooth will be sensitive and the nerve chamber prone to damage.

Your dentist will assess the amount of decay or damage and determine from there how well your tooth can hold up with a filling.

Benefits of a Dental Crown

Having a crown placed is proactive. By choosing a crown, you will protect your compromised tooth from breaking down any further. This means:

  • Less chance of sensitivity
  • You can chew on it as normal without fear of fracture
  • More likely to last longer than a large regular filling
  • It can help you avoid the need for a root canal or extraction

A crown (tooth-colored) is also a great option for a tooth that shows when you smile because it will look like a complete natural tooth. Find out more about the benefits of dental crowns by visiting your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Crabapple Dental
12670 Crabapple Rd #110
Alpharetta, GA 30004
(678) 319-0123

Apr
6

Four Reasons You Need a Crown

Posted in Crowns

Has your dentist told you that you need a crown? If so, there are many reasons why your tooth may need this restoration.

What is a crown?

A crown covers an entire tooth above the gumline. Your dentist will first need to remove any decay and shape the tooth to hold a crown on top. You will typically wear a temporary crown until your permanent crown is made and ready to be placed.

Four reasons why you may need a crown are:

Cracked tooth- When you have a crack in your tooth, this can cause pain when you chew. As you bite down on food, this adds pressure and causes your cracked tooth to pull apart. A crown will cover the tooth and hold it together to help relieve the pain.

Broken tooth- If you have a tooth with a large filling, that can weaken your tooth and cause it to crack or break. A crown would be needed to cover the tooth and keep it together.

Implants- Once a dental implant is placed into your jawbone, a crown is needed to place on top of the implant to function like a natural tooth.

After a Root Canal- When a tooth has a root canal procedure, the inside of a tooth is cleaned out and refilled which can make the tooth more prone to cracking. Your dentist will likely place a crown on your tooth after you have had a root canal to help prevent tooth fractures.

Do you think you need a crown?

Visit your dentist. They will be able to determine if a crown is right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Timber Springs Dental
5444 Atascocita Road Suite 100
Humble, TX
(713) 244-8929

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