Dental Tips Blog


Think Your Dental Crown is Too Big? What You Can Do

Posted in Crowns

Your dentist will always check the fit of a crown before cementing it in place. Take this opportunity to let him or her know whether you feel the cap looks too big.

You’d quickly notice whether a front tooth with a crown looks bigger than the rest.

But it can take a while for you to realize that a back tooth crown feels larger than it should. Once the anesthetic and sensitivity wear off, your crown may become more noticeable.

Why It Happens

Sometimes, it has to do with the way the crown was placed. If the cap isn’t properly positioned on the tooth, it can feel higher than the other teeth. You might sense that the capped tooth is the first one that you bite down on.

Alternatively, the crown itself may have a ridge or peak on the chewing surface that’s too high.

Why It’s Bad

You’ll be able to tell if something doesn’t fit right. In fact, your tongue may get tired from feeling it all day.

But it’s also bad news for your teeth. A poorly-fitted crown can wear down the opposing tooth it bites against. It can also stress the core and root of the tooth it’s covering. An uneven bite can tax your jaw, causing TMJ issues.

What to Do

Go see your dentist for an adjustment. If the crown is really off, then he or she may be able to reposition it.

The most common fix, however, is simply polishing down the high points on the crown. The dentist will use a special drill piece to remove areas that feel too big when you bite down.

Better yet, see a dentist who works closely with their lab and uses careful tools to assess the fit of your crown from the very get go!

Posted on behalf of:
Dental Care Center At Kennestone
129 Marble Mill Rd NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 424-4565


Could Your Dental Crown Be Trying to Tell You Something?

Posted in Crowns

Dental crowns are meant to provide protection and structural support to weakened teeth. When it’s doing its job properly, a cap should be so comfortable that you don’t even know it’s there.

So if you notice any of these signs of premature wear on your crown, then it could be time to see your dentist about extending its mileage.

Your Crown Is Flattening

Is your crown looking a little less tooth-like these days? Dental crowns can wear down similarly to how teeth do if you have a habit of grinding your teeth. This shows up clearly on porcelain-covered metal crowns. Areas of heavy wear will show through as dark metal spots on the chewing surface.

Your Crown Shifts Around

A loose crown is a sign that the cement bond isn’t secure, if it was recently placed. Otherwise, it could mean that you have a cavity destroying the tooth beneath the cap.

The Crowned Tooth Is Getting More Sensitive

A little sensitivity is typical after getting a new crown. Your tooth needs time to adjust. But if your crown is only recently getting more sensitive, then that could mean there is a leak at the margin letting acids and bacteria sneak in.

Gums Around The Crowned Tooth Are Receding

Receded gums are fairly common with crowned teeth. But too much recession could indicate that your current cap is irritating the gum tissue. Sometimes, an open margin on the crown or excess cement underneath it could be to blame.

If your capped tooth is starting to feel a little strange, plan a visit to your dentist to get it looked at.

Posted on behalf of:
Buford Family Dental
4700 Nelson Grogdon Blvd. NE #210
Buford, GA 30518


What Happens When You Get a Dental Crown

Posted in Crowns

The famous gold teeth of dental lore are the forerunners to today’s sleek and comfortable dental caps. While dental crowns can still be made out of gold, most patients seek out restorations made from more life-like materials like porcelain.

But you’ve probably wondered more than once: how is a crown placed?

First of all, you visit your dentist to find out if a crown is even the best option for your tooth. He or she will help you decide on a material that best suits the needs of your smile.

Appointment #1

To get started, the tooth is numbed with anesthetic and reshaped so it will fit under a “cap.” Next, a series of impressions is taken to make a mold for the crown and to get an idea of how your teeth fit together when you bite. This ensures your restoration feels natural when you chew on it. Afterwards, your dentist will place a temporary crown to protect the exposed tooth.

The whole first appointment usually takes less than an hour. Within two weeks, the dental lab will have finished up your final crown and your dentist will call you in to have it placed.

Appointment #2

This appointment should be even shorter than the first. Your dentist will lift off the temporary crown, check the fit of the new one, and then cement it in place. Once it’s bonded, the fit will be checked and adjusted again.

You’ll leave with some instructions for special care in the early days of getting a crown. Make sure to ask your dentist for suggestions on making your crown last as long as possible.

Posted on behalf of:
River Ranch Dental
203 George Hopper Rd #100
Midlothian, TX 76065
(469) 672-4245


How Long Will a Cap on My Front Tooth Last?

Posted in Crowns

You can expect a cap on a front tooth to last as long as any other. Dental crowns have an average life expectancy of ten years. Some hold out for fifteen years or even longer.

Reasons for a crown to fail include:

  • Teeth-grinding habit
  • Decay
  • Trauma
  • Poor oral hygiene
  • Wear-and-tear

How To Make A Dental Cap Last

Dental crowns, like any other teeth, require regular cleaning to stay strong and beautiful. It may be a “permanent” cap and your tooth may feel nice and safe, but there is still a tiny margin where bacteria can sneak in. Don’t overlook your crown when it comes to brushing and flossing. Good hygiene can help your crown last at least a decade.

Disclaimers About Front Tooth Crowns

Crowning a tooth that shows when you smile typically takes more time than other crowns. This is because more detail and effort go into making it look nice. After all, it’s right there in the smile-zone where everyone will be looking!

That being the case, you’re going to want to be extra careful with your cap so that you don’t have to go through the process again. Every time you redo a crown, not only does it cost money, but it weakens your tooth.

It’s tempting to use teeth to open things like bags and packages and to tear off tags from clothing. Fight the inclination to use your teeth as tools! A crown could be damaged even more easily than a natural tooth.

Posted on behalf of:
Dr. David Kurtzman D.D.S.
611 Campbell Hill St. NW #101
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 980-6336


I Just Got a Crown. How Should I Care for It?

Posted in Crowns

Keeping your new dental crown clean is the best way to get the most out of it. In addition to having your teeth cleaned at the dentist’s office, you also need to clean it carefully at home.

Brushing and flossing are crucial to maintaining your crown long-term. Crowns tend to trap more plaque and calculus at their margins than natural teeth. It’s completely safe and highly recommended to brush thoroughly. You can’t scratch them with soft bristles.

If sugars and bacteria are left uncleaned and leak under the crown edges, the tooth will likely end up with a cavity – which is no easy fix. The dentist either has to “patch” the tooth with a filling or replace the crown all together (which we all know is expensive).

Don’t Be Afraid of it Falling Off

That simply won’t happen. It’s been attached with permanent cement that has bonded with the tubules within your natural tooth. It’s not going anywhere!

It’s understandable that you’re nervous. After all, you saw the dentist prep your tooth for a crown, and you know that the natural tooth underneath is a little smaller than those surrounding. It would be embarrassing if anyone could ever see that.

Just know how unlikely that is to ever happen. Dental cement does not have an easy bond to break. Crowns have an extremely tight fit to keep materials from leaking underneath and causing decay.

Long Term Maintenance

Keep your crown clean. Visit your dentist for regular check-ups at least every six months. Treat your crowns like you would your natural teeth or maybe even a little bit better. It was, after all, an investment. Invest a little time for excellent homecare, and you’re likely to be pleased with your purchase for years to come.

Posted on behalf of:
Wayne G. Suway, DDS, MAGD
1820 The Exchange SE #600
Atlanta, GA 30339
(770) 953-1752


What Is the Core Buildup of a Dental Crown?

Posted in Crowns

A dental crown is a hollow cap that’s shaped like a tooth. Inside, it’s got an empty space that fits right over the top of a tooth. So in order to support a crown, teeth have to be trimmed to the right shape. Otherwise, the crown would be too bulky.

When You Need More Than A Crown

On occasion, a tooth might be too damaged by decay or fracture to support a crown. It might have lost a lot of structure to large old fillings. In order to keep the tooth strong, your dentist may do what’s called a “core buildup.”

As it sounds, a core buildup reinforces that center foundation of the tooth which seats the finished crown. Your dentist will use restorative materials to mold this new core which will be the same size and shape that your tooth would be naturally.

What If A Core Buildup Isn’t Enough?

Your dentist might then take things a step further and use a post to help secure the material to the tooth. This ensures a stable foundation to support your dental crown.

A core and post won’t necessarily guarantee a stronger tooth, however. All the extra material placed in your tooth can weaken it. But the post and core may buy you a little more time with your tooth before it is ultimately extracted.

Do You Need A Post And Core?

If it seems too risky to attempt a core buildup, extraction may be your only option. It all depends on the quality of the tooth structure you have left. Professional dental x-rays are the best way to determine this. Talk with your dentist about your restoration options.

Posted on behalf of:
Columbia Dental Center
915 N Main St #2
Columbia, IL 62236
(618) 281-6161


Should You Get a Crown or a Filling?

Posted in Crowns

You’ve noticed a suspicious dark spot on your tooth and now you’re wondering what you should do about it. If that’s actually a cavity, then it will need some kind of treatment.

Two of the most common methods for repairing tooth decay are fillings and dental crowns. Which will you need?

How Traditional Fillings Work

A filling is a flowable material placed inside a hollowed out space in the tooth. It’s usually light-cured and sets up in a matter of minutes. Fillings are your first line of defense in repairing cavities.

What Makes A Crown Different?

A crown, or cap, is a solid piece of material like porcelain that covers your entire tooth. If a lot of your tooth is damaged from decay, a crown can restore its shape.

Deciding Which Restoration You Need

Which restoration you need depends mainly on how much of your tooth is affected. If the cavity isn’t too deep, a filling is usually enough. But if the decay has reached deeper layers of your tooth or has caused large pieces to chip away, then you’ll need the extra protection of a crown.

What if the damage to your tooth falls somewhere in-between?

Your dentist may recommend a hybrid restoration called an indirect filling (inlay/onlay.) It’s like a filling-crown combo created outside the mouth and then cemented into the tooth like a piece in a puzzle.

It’s impossible to figure out exactly what your tooth needs without having a professional examine it. Call your dentist today to schedule an exam. He or she will help you decide on the restoration that matches your needs.

Posted on behalf of:
Seven Hills Dentistry
1305 Cedarcrest Rd #115
Dallas, GA 30132
(678) 257-7117


How Acidic Is Your Mouth?

Most of us aren’t too concerned with measuring the pH of our mouths on a regular basis. Your dentist probably won’t tell you to do that every day, anyway.

Even so, it’s good to educate yourself on a few basic facts of how acidity affects your smile.

What Is pH?

The pH scale goes from 1 to 14 with lower numbers being the acidic ones (like lemon juice and vinegar) and the higher numbers being basic (think baking soda and soap).

On the pH scale, 5.5 is a golden number: below this, tooth enamel starts to wear down. That’s right, under acidic conditions your teeth get weaker and more prone to cavities.

Another fun fact about high acidity: cavity-causing bacteria love acid and produce lots of it themselves. So an oral environment with a low pH, even by just a margin, is ripe for tooth decay.

Fighting Acid In The Mouth

Healthy human saliva clocks in at close to 7 on the pH scale. That’s a nice neutral number. In fact, it’s Nature’s way of cleaning your teeth and neutralizing any acid that is there. When people suffer dry mouth, they miss out on these great benefits.

On top of using saliva substitutes, you can also bring your pH levels up to par by:

  • Avoiding acidic drinks (juice, soda, sports drinks)
  • Cutting back on sugary carbs which metabolize into acids in the mouth
  • Snack on dairy items which neutralize pH
  • Up your fluoride intake and oral hygiene game to keep your enamel strong

See your dentist for more tips and product recommendations to fight the effects of acidity on enamel and reduce the need for dental fillings, crowns, and other tooth restorations.

Posted on behalf of:
Touchstone Dentistry
2441 FM 646 W Suite A
Dickinson, TX 77539
(832) 769-5202


When Your Child Needs a Dental Crown

No parent likes to hear that their baby has a cavity. Whether that “baby” is 3 years old or 13, cavities can spell trouble for a smile.

A dental crown is often the restorative option of choice for repairing large cavities in small mouths. Saving the tooth can help your child avoid orthodontic complications caused by early tooth loss.

Why Your Child Needs A Crown

Baby teeth are much smaller and more delicate than adult teeth. They don’t have a very thick layer of tooth between the nerve chamber and the oral environment.

So when a cavity forms, it doesn’t take long before it reaches the nerve where it can cause an abscess.

There isn’t always enough time or tooth structure to just fill a baby tooth. A dental crown will provide more protection and is far less risky.

The Best Kind Of Crown For Kids

Stainless steel crowns are the material of choice because they are:

  • Long lasting
  • Cost-effective
  • Not sensitive

A steel crown doesn’t look as pretty as a white one, but that’s okay since the tooth will fall out when the adult one arrives.

What Can You Expect At The Crown Procedure?

Your dentist will make sure your son or daughter’s tooth is completely numb. For very young or nervous children, there are a number of anesthesia options that can help them relax.

The dentist next carefully cleans out the decay. He or she may also have to treat the pulp if the cavity was deep enough. A pre-fabricated steel crown is then securely cemented to the tooth. Your child won’t feel a thing during the process.

Talk with your dentist if you have any concerns about your child’s smile and dental crowns.

Posted on behalf of:
Sweetpea Smiles
15850 Southwest Fwy #400
Sugar Land, TX 77478
(281) 566-6100


Why You Should Get a Crown: 4 Reasons

Posted in Crowns

No one really ever wants to get another dental crown. But there are some good reasons why you should seriously consider your dentist’s recommendation.

  1. Give Your Tooth A Few More Years

Crowning a tooth buys you more time than a filling would. This is especially true if you have a deep cavity. Getting a filling could be a real gamble – you don’t know for sure if it will keep the decay out. A dental crown, on the other hand, is a much neater and more complete solution. It could even allow you to put off the need for a root canal.

  1. Change Your Smile’s Entire Look

Sometimes, a crown is simply a good way to change the look of a front tooth that is:

  • Deeply stained
  • Misshapen
  • Chipped
  • Rough-textured

It’s usually a great idea to just crown a tooth with extensive cosmetic damage.

  1. Prevent Wear From Grinding And Clenching

A habit of grinding and clenching your teeth at night is a sure way to wear down tooth enamel. Crowning a tooth or two might be the best way you can prevent severe fractures.

It’s also a good idea to look into devices (such as splints or night guards) that will prevent your grinding tendency from damaging teeth and restorations.

  1. Fill In An Empty Space

How does a crown do that?

Crowning a couple otherwise healthy teeth could allow you to connect the gap between them with a dental bridge. That’s because these dental crowns play a key role in supporting fixed each end of a bridge.

How else can a crown benefit your smile and dental health in general? Ask your dentist by scheduling a visit.

Posted on behalf of:
Meadowbrook Family Dental
8848 Calvine Rd #120
Elk Grove, CA 95828
(916) 912-4126

Most Popular

Tori, Exostosis, and Extra Bone Formation in the Mouth

A fairly common occurrence in the mouth is the existence of extra bone development along the outside or inside of the jawline near the teeth, or in the roof of…

Difference Between Conscious and Unconscious Sedation

Sedation dentistry is a wonderful option for many people who would not or cannot tolerate dentistry in a traditional dental setting.   Many people have a fear of visiting the dentist,…

Lingual Frenectomy versus Lingual Frenuloplasty

Lingual frenectomy and lingual frenuloplasty are both dental procedures used to correct a condition called ankyloglossia. Ankylogloassia, more commonly known as ‘tied tongue’, is an abnormality of the lingual frenulum….