Dental Tips Blog


Why a Dental Implant Isn’t a Good Idea for Your Child

Posted in Dental Implants

You wouldn’t be the first parent to ask if it’s okay for kids to get dental implants.

An implant is often ideal for filling in smile gaps. If your child has a permanently damaged or knocked-out adult tooth, then a dental implant can seem like the perfect remedy.

But your dentist may suggest otherwise.

A few reasons include:

  • Implants take a lot of time to heal
  • Kids aren’t always compliant with basic oral hygiene, so they may have a harder time keeping an implant healthy
  • Implant placement can be an intense procedure for a child

Most importantly, however, your child’s developing mouth is just too dynamic for an implant.

Even after adult teeth come in your child’s mouth keeps growing. The jawbone gets larger to make more space for incoming molars. This growth action is not the best environment for an implant to heal into.

Implants need solid bone to fit securely. But if that bone is steadily expanding over the months of healing, the implant won’t find a secure hold.

It would end up being a waste of money to put an implant in your child’s smile. Worse still, you could put your son or daughter through unnecessary discomfort.

So what can you do when your child loses a permanent tooth?

Happily, an implant could still be an option . . . down the road. Once physical growth in the jaw stops, you and your child can discuss together the pros and cons of getting a dental implant.

In the meantime, ask your dentist about temporary tooth replacements for kids. A removable bridge, flipper, or space maintainer is usually appropriate. Schedule a smile reconstruction consultation soon after your child loses an adult tooth.

Posted on behalf of:
Dream Dentist
1646 W U.S. 50
O’Fallon, IL 62269
(618) 726-2699


How Noticeable Are Dental Implants?

Posted in Dental Implants

It’s not unusual to worry if a dental implant or two would be noticeable in your smile. You might be thinking about restoring your bite with an implant, but you’re afraid the metal “root” will show.

Yes, dental implants are made up of titanium restorations that replace a tooth root. But that metal part doesn’t show up the way you might think.

What Dental Implants Look Like

An implant is a small metal post topped with a connecting abutment, which supports a crown. This “cap” is made of a material like porcelain that resembles the texture, color, and translucency of real tooth enamel.

The crown is the only part that shows when you smile. It covers all metal parts that show above the gum line. All the rest is hidden away from everybody’s sight, deep within your gums and bone.

What If You Don’t Have Enough Gums?

In some cases, patients don’t have enough supporting structures to retain and hide an implant. If that’s true in your case, then your dentist will give you a few options:

  • Gum/bone grafts
  • Shorter implants
  • Dental bridge
  • Ceramic (tooth colored) implants

If You Can See Your Implant

If you’ve had an implant for quite some time and the metal post has become visible, then it’s time to see your dentist. This could be a sign of gum recession or, more seriously, aggressive gum disease.

If you need to replace a diseased tooth with an implant, you can wear a very low-profile partial to fill in the gap while you complete treatment.

The only ones who will know you have an implant are you, your dentist, and anyone else you choose to tell!

Posted on behalf of:
Taylor Dental and Implant Center
13429 Macarthur Blvd.
Oklahoma City OK 73142
(405) 722-4400


How to Get a Dental Implant

Posted in Dental Implants

A dental implant is today’s tooth replacement option of choice. It’s quite simply a metal “root” inserted into the jawbone. Implants support crowns, bridges, or dentures to complete a smile.

Can your smile benefit from an implant (or two or three)?

Implant Consultation

The very first thing you need to do is visit a dentist with experience in placing dental implants. A series of x-rays and other imaging will help your provider estimate how well your mouth can support an implant.

You’ll discuss some important factors like:

  • Amount and quality of bone in your jaw
  • Your overall health
  • Factors that may inhibit healing
  • Your short and long-term smile goals

If it’s determined that an implant is right for you, your dentist will move on to the treatment planning phase.

Implant Placement Planning

Today’s technology allows implant professionals to basically perform virtual surgery to find out the best way to place your new restorations. This takes out the guesswork and secures the chances for successful healing.

Digital imaging and virtual planning will give your dentist an idea of how many implants are needed, what size they should be, and how they should be positioned to make the most of existing bone.

If you need bone grafting to build up your jaw, this will happen in advance of getting an implant or at the time of your surgery.

What’s It Like To Get An Implant?

Your actual implant doesn’t take long to place. Most appointments are less than an hour. With just a numbing shot or two, you won’t feel a thing. Follow post-op directions for healing and you should enjoy a speedy recovery.

Contact your dentist today to get started!

Posted on behalf of:
Bayshore Dental Center
810 W Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd #2900
Seffner, FL 33584
(813) 330-2006


I Lost My Tooth Years Ago – Can I Still Get an Implant?

Posted in Dental Implants

Although you’ve known about dental implants for years, you’re only just now starting to consider the option.

Is it too late for you to fill the gap in your smile with an implant?

How much time goes by between losing a tooth and getting an implant isn’t that important. There’s no time limit, no set figure. What does matter is the condition your mouth is in.

How Are Your Bone Levels?

Bone responds to the presence of tooth roots. If there is no tooth in an area, then the bone tissue has nothing to stimulate its rebuilding process. Over time, it shrinks and becomes too shallow to retain an implant.

Even if you have too little bone, implant therapy could still be an option. Smaller implants, bone grafting, and careful planning have made implants a success for many a patient with poor bone levels.

Is There A Tooth In The Way?

You might have a gap in your smile, but it’s possible that neighboring teeth have shifted forward or tipped out of line. This would block the space for an implant to fit into. To make room, you may need orthodontic treatment for a short period of time to open the space back up before you can have an implant placed there.

After Years With Dentures

If you’re just now considering implants after wearing dentures for some time, that’s okay. Your dentist can help you work with what you have to place implants that will anchor your denture for a secure bite.

Contact your dentist to schedule an evaluation and see if dental implants are right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Paul Jang Dentistry
14711 Princeton Avenue, Ste. 12
Moorpark, CA 93021


How Long Does it Take to Recover From Dental Implant Surgery?

Posted in Dental Implants

Before you jump into the process of planning a dental implant treatment, you should have realistic expectations of how long it takes.

Typical Dental Implant Procedures

Having the implant placed doesn’t take long, at all. It should take your dentist less than an hour. But in most cases, you don’t get to enjoy the finished product for several months.

Dental implants need time to heal and fuse with the bone before they can bear the force of biting. After about 3-6 months of getting the implant, you’ll be ready to have the healing cap placed.

After a couple weeks of letting the gums heal, you’ll be ready for a crown.

What About Same-Day Implants?

Recovery from surgery is similar for same-day implants. You just don’t have to wait as long to get your “teeth put on.” But bear in mind that this procedure isn’t right for everyone.

Can You Speed Up Recovery?

You can make your healing period productive and brief by following your dentist’s instructions. These may include:

  • Not smoking
  • Icing the site to bring down swelling
  • Getting lots of bedrest and limiting physical activity
  • Sticking to a liquid and soft foods diet

The more time your implant has to heal into your jaw before you use it, the better. So your recovery and healing should be all about rest and not putting weight on your implant by biting on it.

Whichever implant procedure you have, it may take you six months to a year to fully complete your smile. You may need more time if you also have bone grafting.

Ask your dentist for an estimate on how long it would take you to heal from getting an implant.

Posted on behalf of:
Dental Care of Acworth
5552 Robin Road Suite A
Acworth GA 30103


Yes, Losing Your Tooth IS a Big Deal!

Posted in Dental Implants

Contrary to what many people believe, there’s nothing natural about losing teeth. Even so, what’s so bad about missing just one or two teeth?

Missing Teeth and Alignment

The biggest issue comes down to is your smile’s alignment. Your teeth are always looking to be on the move. If there’s an empty space directly above or below them, they will try to grow to fill it. If there’s an empty space in front of them, they will drift forward to fill it.

Unfortunately, it throws off your entire bite when teeth tip out of line. It may become harder to chew. Those crooked teeth will be harder to keep clean and restore. They can also become vulnerable to diseases that make them fall out.

A bad bite could also potentially lead to TMJ complications and chronic headaches.

A Broken Smile?

Missing teeth can significantly affect the shape of your smile. This isn’t just because there is a gap or two. The bone in your jaw is reinforced by the presence of tooth roots. Without teeth, that bone will start to shrink and create craters in the gums.

Why You Should Replace Missing Teeth

In summary, missing teeth can result in:

  • Disease to other teeth
  • Alignment and bite problems
  • Collapsed smile
  • Difficulty fitting other restorations

Basically, the more teeth you are missing, the sooner the ones you have left will follow suit!  There are many options to replace missing teeth including dental implants, dentures, and a bridge or partial bridge.

Check with your dentist to find out whether your missing teeth have the potential to cause trouble. If so, talk to your dentist about which restoration options that are right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Center For Restorative, Cosmetic & Implant Dentistry
711 Greenbriar Pkwy, Suite 101
Chesapeake, VA 23320
(757) 547-2770


How Long Will a Dental Implant Last?

Posted in Dental Implants

Your implant is designed to feel like a normal tooth, but it can take some getting used to. After the surgical placement, the tissue around these restorations need time to heal. You’ll also be visiting the dentist for multiple appointments.

With all the time and effort involved, there’s no side-stepping the issue – dental implants can cost more than other tooth replacements. But rather than looking at them as an expense, it best to see them for what they really are: a smart investment.

Just as with any other smart investment, you can expect the payout of a dental implant to be worth all of the time and start-up costs. What this also means is that you can expect your implant to last you a very long time!

Lifespan Of Dental Implants

As an implant integrates with your bone and gums, it essentially becomes a part of you. It isn’t going anywhere. The best part about investing in an implant is that they can last you a lifetime.

Dental implants are commonly made from titanium. You’re not likely to have an allergic reaction and it won’t break down. Top it off with a sturdy crown, and you’ve got the next best thing to a natural tooth.

Investing In Implants

Virtually all other tooth restoration options are temporary. From bridges to dentures, you’re not going to find a replacement that lasts as long as implants do.

Of course, there’s much you still need to do to keep your implant strong. It might not be a natural tooth, but it has natural gums and bone around it. Keeping your implant clean is the key to making it last.

Talk with your dentist for information if you’re curious about implants.

Posted on behalf of:
Marietta Dental Professionals
550 Franklin Gateway SE
Marietta, GA 30067
(770) 514-5055


Subperiosteal vs. Endosteal Dental Implants

Posted in Dental Implants

The goal of dental implants is to replace missing teeth with a secure and discreet solution. No one ever has to know that the teeth you have aren’t natural.

However, not all implants are the same.

Endosteal and Subperiosteal Implants

“Endosteal” means “within bone” and it covers classic dental implants. They are inserted directly into the bone for support. The implant is a small screw that acts just like a tooth root.

Breaking down “subperiosteal” we understand it to mean “below the gums, near the bone.” So subperiosteal implants don’t actually go through the bone. Instead, they rest on the jawbone just under the gum tissue.

These implants are attached to a metal framework that sits on the jawbone like a saddle on a horse’s back. Only the implant attachments show up above the gums and these anchor the false teeth to the mouth.

There is even a third kind of implant called “transosteal” which goes through the bone completely. The implants come out through the gums, but they are anchored by a plate attached to the chin, which is also hidden under skin and gums.

Why The Difference?

Implant support systems come in different designs to make the most of the bone you have available in your jaw. It all comes down to what kind of support your smile needs.

Going a long time without teeth can cause bone to shrink and limit the amount of anchoring material you have to work with.

Do you feel that a special implant system could change the way you smile for the better? An implant specialist or your general dentist could make some recommendations. Call to schedule a consultation.

Posted on behalf of:
Cane Bay Family Dentistry
1724 State Rd #4D
Summerville, SC 29483
(843) 376-4157


Is A Dental Implant Safe For Me?

Posted in Dental Implants

Dental implant surgery has a very high success rate. In fact, it’s one of the most predictable procedures in the dental field today.

Implant technology offers a lot of potential benefits including:

  • Aesthetic appeal
  • Preservation of bone
  • No harm to existing natural teeth
  • Permanent, lifelong tooth replacement option
  • Easy care and maintenance

The process of getting an implant, however, is one that you need to think through carefully in light of your current health.

Is The Surgery Safe?

Dental implant surgery is very safe. It’s usually performed under local anesthesia, meaning that patients will be numb but don’t have to be sedated. The procedure is very minimal and most patients are surprised at how quickly they recover.

With careful planning, your dentist will ensure that your implant is placed at the correct angle.

Who Should Be Cautious Of Implants?

Children definitely do not qualify for this kind of surgery. This is because their jaws aren’t fully developed yet. An implant, once placed, stays rooted in the bone for life. If that bone continues to grow and spacing between teeth changes, that implant would end up not fitting into the smile correctly.

If you have impaired healing ability, it can be tough for your body to accept a dental implant. This includes conditions like:

  • Smoking
  • Diabetes
  • Uncontrolled gum disease

If any of those conditions apply to you, you don’t have to feel that your dream of an implant is an impossible one. By communicating with your doctor and dentist, you can get your health to a place where it’s much easier to place implants.

Get started today by contacting your dentist for a consultation.

Posted on behalf of:
Ambler Dental Care
602 S Bethlehem Pike C-2
Ambler, PA 19002
(215) 643-1122


Which Is Better: Partial Dentures or Implants?

Sometimes, the most annoying teeth are the ones that just aren’t there anymore.

A gap in your smile isn’t just a blow to your pride. It can also be a trap for irritating food leftovers. Empty spaces also allow your other teeth to move and shift out of place.

One thing is certain: you must fill in that empty space. The question is: with what?

Partial Dentures For A Non-Invasive Fix

A partial is a dental prosthesis with one or several replacement teeth attached to it. It’s a metal frame that rests on your remaining natural teeth for support.

What’s good about a partial is that you don’t have to wait very long to get your completed smile. It’s also a non-invasive and conservative procedure. This is really the only option for a person who can’t have surgery. The only downside to having a partial is the fact that you can’t leave it in your mouth 24/7. It has to come out for cleaning and to give your gums a break.

Permanently Restore Your Smile With An Implant

Dental implants are metal screws that anchor firmly and permanently into the jawbone. These are, in turn, topped with crowns that look and feel just like natural teeth. An implant is the smile solution that stays with you for life. It doesn’t need regular adjustment and you don’t remove it for cleaning.

Which Restoration Is Right For You?

The “best” option is highly relative. It depends entirely on your individual needs. You’re only going to find out which is right for you by scheduling a visit to your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Gainesville Dental Group
1026 Thompson Bridge Rd
Gainesville, GA 30501
(770) 297-0401

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