Dental Tips Blog

Aug
29

Help! My Toddler Won’t Let Me Brush Her Teeth!

Is your nightly brushing routine coming down to a battle of wills?

You know that oral hygiene is important, so you’re tempted to hold your toddler down just to get the brushing chore done. But balance is essential if you’re going to help your child develop a positive view of oral health and hygiene.

When your toddler gets a little older, you can start appealing to her power of reason to encourage her to brush. For now, try these tips to keep tooth brushing a fun, engaging, and relaxed activity for your child.

Keep it brief. The younger the child, the shorter the attention span! While your child is very small, the most important thing is simply getting her comfortable with the idea of brushing. Don’t fret if you feel you can’t do a very thorough job. Praise her for cooperating for even half a minute.

Nix the paste. Even though many toddler toothpastes are fluoride-free, some babies just hate the sensation. It’s okay to brush without it if that helps your little one tolerate the activity.

Brush together. Kids like to do what they see their parents doing. Make tooth brushing a group activity everyone participates in before bedtime. Eventually, your toddler will catch on.

Take turns. Let your child try brushing your teeth, then try brushing hers. Let her try brushing her own teeth, and then once again try brushing hers. Switching it up gives your toddler the feeling that they have more control in the situation and shouldn’t be as nervous.

Talk with your child’s dentist or pediatrician to get more ideas on how to provide age-appropriate oral hygiene care.

Posted on behalf of:
Springhurst Hills Dentistry
10494 Westport Rd Suite 107
Louisville, KY 40241
(502) 791-8358

Aug
7

The Time of Day You Schedule Your Kids’ Appointments is Important!

You’re unbelievably busy. Sometimes, just too busy to worry about details like what time your child’s dental appointment is at.

But that’s one small detail that you might not want to brush off so quickly. When it comes to kids, a little time makes a big difference.

The time of day your child comes in to see the dentist can affect a lot: their mood, how well they cooperate, how much the dentist can get done, and even how your child views dental care.

Is Your Child A Morning Person?

Most toddlers are fresh and energetic first thing in the morning. An early appointment may be best so that they get it over with quickly. Then, they can spend the rest of the day forgetting the event if it wasn’t their favorite thing!

Just be sure that the schedule doesn’t interfere with any daily naps. A grouchy toddler is not easy to provide dental treatment for!

Small People, Big Pressures

As adults, we often miss the good old days of school when our worries were few and small.

But we also tend to forget just how big those worries seemed at the time.

Your child, although old enough to cooperate at the dentist’s, still gets tired just like you do. He or she may be stressed after a bad day, a tough exam, or after school activities.

As easy as it sounds to book your kid’s appointment for right after school, try to think of how they may feel. Don’t push them to do more in a day than they can handle!

Your family dentist can provide more tips on how to help your children have a positive experience at the dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Gold Hill Dentistry
2848 Pleasant Road #104
Fort Mill,  South Carolina 29708
(803) 566-8055

Jul
12

Is This Normal? 4 Questions Parents Ask About Kids’ Teeth

As a first-time parent, it’s easy to be anxious about your child’s growth and development. Or, as a second-time parent, you may be worried about why your youngest kid’s teeth are a little different from those of their sibling!

Fortunately, dental experts in your area have been looking after the dental needs of kids for a long time and know what issues to expect.

Here are some of the most common questions that parents ask their children’s dentist:

  1. Why Are My Child’s Teeth So Yellow?

When adult teeth first grow in, they tend to look dark yellow compared with pearly white baby teeth. This is normal, but some discoloration could be staining as a result of poor oral hygiene.

  1. What Are Those Bumps On My Kid’s Teeth?

As adult front teeth grow in, you’ll notice little bumps on the biting edge. These are just artifacts from tooth development. They’ll smooth out on their own with time and use.

  1. Do Girls Usually Lose Teeth Before Boys Do?

Yes, this is perfectly normal. From childhood through puberty it’s not unusual for girls to mature faster than boys.

  1. Should I Be Worried About Teeth Crowding?

As baby teeth are coming out and adult teeth are coming in, it’s typical to see a confusing mix in your kid’s smile.

Adult teeth usually straighten out on their own with time, but pediatric dentists recommend that your child sees an orthodontist for an exam by age 7.

You probably have many other questions besides these!

To get expert advice tailored to your child’s needs, schedule a visit with your pediatric dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Milton Dental Specialists
13075 Hwy 9, Suite 110
Milton, GA 30004
(770) 521-2100

Jun
20

Parents, It’s 10 O’Clock – Have Your Kids Brushed Their Teeth?

Brushing your teeth before sleeping is a classic bedtime routine. It’s also easy to slack off on this activity or skip it altogether.

Are your kids in a habit of brushing their teeth before bed?

Helping your children to regularly brush at night is critical to the future of their smiles.

Once A Day Is Not Enough!

Tooth brushing does more than just make a smile look neat and clean.

It also helps prevent oral infections such as cavities and gingivitis. Your child doesn’t just need fresh breath in the mornings right before going to school. Brushing at night in addition to morning is an effective way to control harmful bacterial growth.

Reduce Acid Wear

During sleep, acids from food can soak into the enamel and start the process of breaking it down. Cavity-causing bacteria also produce a lot of acid. If all those germs and debris are usually left undisturbed for eight or nine hours, there’s a high chance of decay setting in.

Brushing right before going to sleep will let your child’s smile rest in a healthy oral environment. It will also give you some peace of mind that there aren’t germs eating away at their enamel overnight. 

Fluoride Time

Fluoride found in dental products is essential to making teeth resistant to cavities. It’s most effective when teeth can soak it up for at least a half hour. If your child only uses fluoride toothpaste right before eating breakfast, then it can only offer limited benefit.

Make sure your children are brushing right before they sleep. Their teeth will thank them for the extra time to get reinforced against decay!

Developing good teeth brushing habits and regular routine checkups with your childrens dentist will help avoid tooth decay and and gum disease and promotes healthy teeth and gums.

Posted on behalf of:
Allen Dentistry
551 W McDermott Dr
Allen, TX 75013
(972)359-9950

Apr
17

When Your Child Won’t Sit Still at the Dentist

That enchanting and innocent smile is worth every effort to protect. But despite your best efforts, your child may not appreciate the need for dentistry.  Managing expectations, choosing a pediatric dentist, and dental sedation are all options for achieving a positive outcome at your child’s next dental visit.

Some children have a hard time sitting still for treatment because of high energy levels. Others struggle with severe anxiety in the medical setting.  What can you do to help your little one get the fullest benefit from every dental visit?

Be Reasonable

It’s not unusual for parents to want their kids to get treatment as soon as possible. All children should have their first oral examination by the time they are around 1 year old. But they may not need a professional cleaning until they are at least 3.

Don’t panic if your dentist feels your child may be too young for dental sealants or a fluoride treatment. This doesn’t mean that your child will miss out on important benefits. Your dentist knows when a procedure will do your child the most good.

Be reasonable in your expectations of what your child can handle. Most necessary major procedures aren’t tolerated well by kids in general.

Discuss Dental Sedation

Even kids who are old enough to be expected to sit through treatment may have a hard time. Certain medications can help them to relax or even doze through a procedure. Your dentist will have suggestions for a safe and effective sedative treatment.

Look for a Pediatric Specialist

After discussing matters with your dentist, you may realize that your child would do better at a pediatric dentist. These offices cater to very young children and those with special needs. When all else fails, your dentist can make a recommendation for a trusted pediatric dentist in your area.

Posted on behalf of:
Dr. Farhan Qureshi, DDS
5206 Dawes Ave
Alexandria, VA 22311
(703) 931-4544

Apr
15

Why Are My Kid’s Teeth Orange?

We all get dirty teeth from time to time, but is it really normal for your child to have bright orange staining across the front of their smile?

Dark Teeth Are Natural, But. . .

One factor that might contribute to your kid’s discolored smile could be the fact that their new adult teeth are just growing in. These teeth look dark in comparison with the bright white baby teeth nearby.

As adult chompers slowly emerge, they may accumulate lots of dental plaque. Plaque is mainly gobs of bacteria that produce odor, stain, and enamel-wearing acids. New teeth are rough in texture and awkwardly-positioned. This could make it hard for your child to brush them thoroughly, leaving behind the plaque and debris that grows into orange stain.

How is the Hygiene?

Orange stain is usually a sign that your child is not brushing well, if at all. Old dental plaque that just sits on teeth for weeks on end will pick up pigments from foods your child eats and it just grows and grows.

Kids may think they do well with brushing twice a day. But closer inspection of their technique might reveal that they aren’t getting the toothbrush close enough to the gum line. As a result, the plaque flourishes and grows thick in that region.

Schedule a Cleaning Visit ASAP

If your son or daughter is having a hard time keeping up with the plaque growth in their mouth, then they definitely could use a professional cleaning by your pediatric dentist. Your local dental hygienist will not only remove surface plaque and orange stain, but he or she will help your child pick up new techniques for brushing properly.

Posted on behalf of:
Touchstone Dentistry
2441 FM 646 W Suite A
Dickinson, TX 77539
(832) 769-5202

Jan
21

When Your Child Won’t Let You Brush

Ideally, you want to get your kids used to having their teeth cleaned while they’re still very young. Good habit forming at a young age can have a huge impact on their future adult smile.

What if in spite of your best efforts, your toddler or preschooler just won’t cooperate with a tooth brushing routine?

Make it Fun

Small children don’t usually grasp the importance of clean teeth. It’s similar to explaining to them why they need to wear socks with their shoes.

Make the activity of tooth brushing as fun and engaging as possible. Let your child watch you brush your teeth, exaggerating the excitement as you do so. Your son or daughter is much more inclined to copy you than to let you do something they aren’t sure they’ll like.

Reverse Roles

Let your kids brush someone else’s teeth. They could be your own teeth or those of a stuffed animal. If your child feels helpful by brushing another’s teeth, then they may understand a little better why they should do it too.

Be Flexible and Patient

Is the toothbrush the issue? Many toddlers are scared of a plastic toothbrush in their mouth. Use a washcloth wrapped around your finger to clean your son or daughter’s teeth until they become accustomed to having something in their mouth. With time and patience, your child will feel more comfortable with a regular brush.

Clean teeth are absolutely vital to your child’s health. Don’t give up because they are resistant! Even if don’t appreciate it now, they will in later years. Ask your pediatric dentist for more tips tailored to your child’s needs.

Posted on behalf of:
Precision Digital Dentistry
674 US-202/206
Suite 7
Bridgewater, NJ 08807
(908) 955-6999

Dec
26

Why Does My Child Have Gaps Between Her Teeth?

Children love to smile! Baby teeth are usually bright white because of the way they are designed. If your child has a beautiful smile – everyone notices! But why is it that some children have large spaces between their teeth? After all, most of us want teeth that are placed perfectly side by side, right?

Widely spaced baby teeth are actually a very good thing! Even though it may not look “pretty,” the wide gaps are actually preserving space for your child’s adult teeth. You don’t want them to be tight together.

As you know, adult teeth are much larger than baby teeth. They are usually about two to three times the size. That means they need more room in the mouth to erupt.

Baby teeth act as placeholders and guides for your child’s underlying adult teeth. Each permanent tooth follows the baby tooth above it. As the baby tooth falls out, the adult tooth erupts in its place. Tooth by tooth, your child’s smile is transformed into the one that they will live with for the rest of his or her life.

Are you starting to see why gaps are essential? The wide spaces between baby teeth ensure that the adult teeth have enough space to erupt properly. If you envy children with teeth that are perfectly side by side – it’s time to change your opinion! Tightly spaced baby teeth mean that the adult teeth will likely appear crowded as they begin to erupt. Crowding means orthodontic concerns later.

If your son or daughter has gaps between their baby teeth, don’t worry – it’s actually a great thing that they do.

Posted on behalf of:
Heritage Dental
23945 Franz Rd Suite A
Katy, TX 77493
(832) 709-2429

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