Dental Tips Blog

Aug
7

Diabetes and Tooth Decay – What’s the Connection?

If you are living with diabetes, then you likely already know about the slew of complications that can follow. Being diabetic puts you at risk for infections, kidney problems, circulation complications, eye issues, and more.

Did you know that cavities should be on that list, as well?

Tooth decay and diabetes share a common denominator: sugar.

How Cavities Start

Cavities are holes in your teeth that are worn away by acid. This erosion can start with acids in your food, but it’s mainly caused by acid-producing bacteria. These germs feed on the carbohydrates that pass through your mouth and give off a waste product that destroys enamel.

This process affects everyone, with or without diabetes. Really, everyone needs to be alert to the concentration of simple carbohydrates their teeth are exposed to.

Diabetics in particular, however, need to be extra vigilant.

Diabetes Affects Your Decay Risk

Glucose is one of those simple carbohydrates that cavity-causing bacteria love to eat. They thrive in a sugary environment. If your body isn’t processing sugar correctly, then your saliva will also register high levels of glucose.

All that extra sugar makes for an environment ripe for tooth decay. But this is usually only an issue if your blood sugar level is frequently out of control.

Diabetes doesn’t have to rule your life if you can keep it under control. By maintaining the best oral health possible, you can also reduce the impact of diabetes on your smile.

See your dentist on a regular basis for checkups and cleanings. He or she will also recommend products to reinforce your teeth against decay and tools to make oral hygiene a breeze.

Posted on behalf of:
Group Health Dental
230 W 41st St
New York, NY 10036
(212) 398-9690

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