Dental Tips Blog

Apr
17

Oral Hygiene Tips for Traveling

Just because you’re heading out of town for a few days is no excuse to leave your oral hygiene routine behind. From forgetting toothpaste to a real dental emergency, here’s how to keep your smile healthy even when you’re away from home.

Get the right-sized toothbrush travel case. Make sure it has some ventilation. If your brush is packed tightly into a case that it can’t move or “breathe” in, then it will never dry out. This makes for the perfect environment for bacteria to flourish.

Air out your toothbrush. Speaking of drying out, set aside time for your toothbrush to enjoy some fresh air. You could leave it on a sunny windowsill (window closed, of course) or on the dash of your car. Too much time spent in a dark travel bag will make your brush quite icky.

Stock up on travel-sized products. You can get any dental product in a travel-friendly quantity. There’s no excuse for not having some toothpaste on hand when it fits so neatly in your purse or glove compartment in your car.

Brush without toothpaste. It does happen – from time to time we forget the toothpaste. Even then, brushing without toothpaste is still effective and necessary to reduce plaque levels.

Have a backup plan. Keep a couple toothbrushes handy in your luggage in case you lose or misplace one at a hotel. Let your dentist know you’ll be out of town if it’s going to be a lengthy trip. Research other dentists in your destination area to find out who you can visit in the event of a dental emergency.

With these tips, you’ll experience a safe trip full of healthy smiles!

Posted on behalf of:
Mitzi Morris, DMD, PC
1295 Hembree Rd B202
Roswell, GA 30076
(770) 475-6767

Jan
21

Dental Emergency: A Broken Crown

It’s hard to miss it when it happens – the look and feel of a broken crown is almost impossible to ignore. Here’s what you need to know in case this happens to you.

Why You Should Do Something About It

Some crowns are coated with a thin porcelain layer while the underlying tooth is protected by a metal layer. When this cap fractures, it’s more unsightly than it is harmful. But other crowns can directly open up your tooth pulp to infection if compromised.

How It Happens

Crown are usually fractured as the result of accidentally biting onto a hard ice cube or popcorn kernel in just the wrong way.

It’s also very common for a cap to break down simply because it was ready to go. Many years of wear takes a toll on even the toughest restoration. The lifespan of your crown may be shortened further if you tend to grind or clench your teeth together. Because of this, a crack can start slowly and suddenly fracture all at once.

What To Do When Your Crown Breaks

How badly is your crown broken? See if you can move it around. If it’s very loose, try to remove it so that you don’t swallow it.

There’s usually no need to visit the emergency room over a broken dental cap. Contact your dentist to schedule a emergency dental visit within the next week. If you have bleeding or extreme sensitivity associated with the fracture, you should see your dentist as soon as possible.

In some cases, an entirely new crown is necessary. Your dentist will let you know what can be done to repair and save your damaged crown.

Posted on behalf of:
The Newport Beach Dentist
1901 Westcliff Drive #6
Newport Beach, CA 92660
(949) 646-2481

Mar
13

Your Dental Emergency

Oral pain should never be ignored.  Even mild mouth discomfort can be the first sign of a bigger problem.  It’s important to notify your dentist for prompt care, if you’re suffering from a dental emergency!

What Can You Do?

When a dental emergency occurs, your immediate reaction is important!  While you wait for expert care, here’s a few helpful tips for the most common oral concerns:

  • A Knocked Out Tooth – Gently rinse an adult tooth and place it back into the socket, being careful not to touch the root.  If that’s not possible, it’s important to keep the tooth moist.  You can retain the tooth between your cheek and gums or submerge it in milk until you get to your dentist.
  • A Sensitive Tooth – Gently swish your mouth with warm water then floss carefully, to determine if the source of sensitivity is caused by trapped food between the teeth.  If pain persists, it may be a cavity or infection, best diagnosed by your dentist.
  • A Chipped Or Broken Tooth – Remove any pieces of tooth that may be loose and bring them to your dentist. In the meantime, gently rinse your mouth with warm water and apply a cold compress to your face to minimize swelling.
  • A Dislodged Crown – If possible, bring your loose crown to your dentist to have it recemented into place.
  • Injury To The Tongue, Gums or Lips – When blood vessels and nerves are injured, infection and permanent damage can occur.  Use water to gently clean the injured area and apply a cold compress.

Call Your Dentist!

While these tips may be helpful for your dental emergency, the most important thing you can do is call your dentist right away.  Don’t endure oral discomfort, especially when your dental health is at risk!

Posted on behalf of:
Linda King, DDS MAGD
4146 Georgia 42
Locust Grove, GA 30248
(770) 898-8872

Jan
31

When to Call Your Dentist After Hours

Do you have a toothache at night time?  You probably want to call your dentist right away, but at the same time, you don’t want to bother your dentist after office hours.  So what should you do in cases like this?  After hour calls to your dentist should be reserved for dental emergencies only.  How do you know if you have an emergency or if it can wait?

If you answer yes to the following questions, you may have a dental emergency that warrants making a phone call:

  • Are you feeling pain that is severe?
  • Is there blood coming from your mouth?
  • Have you had an injury to your mouth or face?
  • Are any of your teeth loose?
  • Are there any areas of swelling in your mouth or on your face?
  • Do you have any swelling or bumps on your gums?

If you are in pain, unable to speak, or are too embarrassed to be seen in public because of your situation – then it probably warrants a call to your dentist. Most offices will accept emergency calls and return your message very quickly to let you know what to do next. If it is a true emergency, it may be necessary to meet you in the office. Thankfully in most cases, your dentist can arrange to have you come in during the next business day.

Many dental emergencies can be prevented by seeing your dentist regularly. Routine checkups and exams identify problems before they have a chance to get worse. If you do have an emergency situation, call your dentist immediately.  All other dental concerns can probably wait until regular office hours to be addressed.

Posted on behalf of:
Crabapple Dental
12670 Crabapple Rd #110
Alpharetta, GA 30004
(678) 319-0123

Jun
1

Is It A Real Dental Emergency?

If you are surprised by finding something unusual going on in your mouth, then calling your dentist as soon as possible is a natural reaction. There are some dental “emergencies,” however, that can wait a few days until a convenient appointment time opens up. When do you drop everything and run to the dentist? When you have some time on your side? These guidelines can help.

Pain:

Wait it out – some discomfort is connected to sensitivity from receding gums, or several teeth may ache because of strong clenching habits.

Call the dentist – severe, or lingering pain, especially if it is connected to temperature changes or bite-pressure, or if it is focused to one particular tooth.

Bleeding:

Wait it out – some bleeding on brushing and flossing can be a simple indicator of gingivitis. This is reversed with proper oral hygiene, and a routine dental cleaning.

Call the dentist – if there is nonstop bleeding following a dental procedure or surgery.

Lost filling/crown or fractured tooth:

Wait it out, but not for long – if the damaged area is not sensitive, you may be able to wait, but no longer than a couple of weeks to have the area restored. Never ignore a damaged tooth for long, even if it doesn’t bother you.

Swelling:

Call the dentist RIGHT AWAY – swelling of the cheek, jaw, or noticing any single spots of swelling on your gums could be a sign of dental abscess.

Visit your dentist regularly for routine exams to stay informed of your dental needs. Your dental team is always ready to answer your questions!

Posted on behalf of:
Grateful Dental
2000 Powers Ferry Rd SE #1
Marietta, GA 30067
(678) 593-2979

May
1

Spring and Summer Bring More Dental Injuries

Did you know that certain parts of the year could make you and your family more at risk for dental injuries and emergencies?

Athletic Activities

Sports and athletic activities are more common in warmer weather months like the summer. The weather feels good, so people get out and get active. That also means there is more of a chance of accidents like falling, getting hit, or coming into contact with someone else. Wearing a professionally fitted mouth guard can prevent accidental tooth fractures, lip lacerations, and even concussions. 

Time at the Pool

Wet environments mean more people slip and fall, especially at water parks, pools, or in backyard activities. Falls in the bathroom (from a wet floor) are one of the top causes of broken teeth, but summertime slips and bumps are a risk as well. 

First Things First

If you’ve busted or broken a tooth, you need to get to the dentist as quickly as possible, even if it isn’t convenient. Place the tooth in a cup of milk or water to keep it moist. Some adults even hold the tooth inside of their cheek if they are desperate (just be sure not to swallow it!) Professional care within one hour offers the best possible outcome for getting the broken tooth back in place.

If you experience dental trauma this year, it’s ok. You might feel scared or anxious about what to do, but your dentist is already prepared. Call your dentist right away to see how quickly you can be seen. Don’t wait until it’s too late – get the care your smile needs to keep it healthy for many more summers to come.

Posted on behalf of :
Prime Dental Care
417 Wall St
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 651-8618

May
1

Do I Call a Doctor or My Dentist?

Some types of urgent situations or illness can leave you wondering “should I call my doctor?” or “can my dentist help me?” If you’ve had these questions go through your mind, you are not alone.

A lot of people forget that dentists don’t just fix teeth – they are actually specialists of tissues in and around the mouth, head and neck. You can even have your dentist check your lymph nodes during an exam, or screen for skin cancer on your face!

Facial Swelling

Swelling in and around the mouth can be extremely painful, but may not warrant a trip to the emergency room. It could be caused by an abscessed tooth or infection that your dentist can quickly diagnose. 

Infections Inside of Your Mouth

Ulcers, growths on your tongue or even bacterial infections are all easily recognized by your dentist. If you are contemplating making a trip out of the way to see a physician for something like this, your dentist may be able to offer you a quicker diagnosis and care recommendation. 

Busted Lips

Let’s say you had an accident that resulted in a busted lip and a broken tooth. Where do you go first? Most people would go to the emergency room, but it’s actually your tooth that needs the quickest response in care. Not only that, but your dentist can also help by suturing your lip and numbing the area to eliminate pain!

If you find yourself experiencing discomfort in or around your mouth, consider calling your dentist. Even if you aren’t sure whether or not it is appropriate, one of the team members can answer any questions that you may have.

Posted on behalf of:
Gilreath Dental Associates
200 White St NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 514-1224

Apr
21

Dental Emergencies

Unfortunately, all emergencies are pretty much unplanned. Dental emergencies like a chipped, cracked, or broken tooth or any kind of abscess are often incredibly painful. Many people who have a dental emergency find that they cannot simply wait days or weeks to have it taken care of. Their mouths are burning with pain, or they cannot eat or drink without severe discomfort – and they cannot live like that for long.

Most dental practices work in room into their schedules to account for dental emergencies. Dentist understand how highly sensitive the mouth is and will generally make every effort to see patients with dental emergencies the day that they call. Dental emergencies like an injury to the tooth or gums or an infection can be potentially serious, and dentists want their patients to understand this so that they will not ignore it.

Because of the serious oral health and general health problems that can result from dental emergencies, it is important to see your dentist as soon as possible. An abscess, for example, is an infection that occurs around the root of a tooth or in between teeth and gums. Abscesses can damage the tissue surrounding the teeth, and if the infection is left untreated, the infection can travel to other parts of the body through the soft tissue.

All forms of oral pain should be evaluated by a dentist promptly. Whether you know the cause (e.g. a knocked out tooth) or not, your dentist is the one who can not only alleviate your discomfort, but find the root cause of the problem. Dental emergencies need prompt attention in order to keep the teeth and mouth healthy. Don’t delay in seeing your dentist for anything that concerns you.

Posted on behalf of Dr. David Janash, Park South Dentistry

Google

Feb
11

When Does Accidental Trauma Become an Emergency?

Sometimes dental emergencies are obvious – you’re experiencing immense pain or have visibly damaged a tooth so severely that you know you’ve got to call your dentist right away. Other times, patients wonder if the accident that they just experienced is something to be alarmed about at all. At what point does an accidental bump or trauma to the mouth become a dental emergency and require emergency dental care?

If you’re in pain, call your dentist.

Should severe pain happen after the accident, or pain develops shortly thereafter, then let your dentist know. Sometimes the damage is internal and can’t be seen, so your dentist will take an x-ray to determine if there are conditions such as root fractures, abscesses, or to nearby teeth. Even if the pain involves the gums or lips, your dentist can help provide wound care or sutures.

If damage is visible, call your dentist.

If your tooth is mobile, broken, or discolored, then call your dental office immediately. Don’t wait. If part of the tooth broke off, then place it in a cup of water or milk and bring it with you.

If everything looks ok, watch your tooth.

Sometimes damage will not be evident until later, even for several years. If the tooth appears stable and it does not become discolored over the next several days, and no swelling along the gumlines erupt, then chances are you’re off the hook! Continue to see your dentist every 6 months and let them know what happened so that an x-ray can be taken just to make sure nothing else is going on that can’t be seen from the outside.

Posted on behalf of Dr. David Janash, Park South Dentistry

Google

Sep
27

Traumatic Dental Injuries in Children

Dental emergencies are one of the most common causes of emergency room visits in children. Slipping during a bath and having trauma to the top front teeth is a frequent experience. If your child falls or incurs some type of trauma, preserve the tooth or broken piece of the tooth by putting it into a cup of water or milk. Should the tooth come out in one whole piece with the root still in tact, try placing the tooth back into the socket and holding it in place.

Another is having a painful abscess erupt on a tooth with a cavity. In severe cases, these abscesses can even cause hospitalization in small children. Getting cavities treated in a timely manner can save your child’s teeth, pain and complications later on down the road.

Sports related injuries are typically avoidable with the use of a professionally fitted athletic guard. Over the counter guards may slip and come out of place, but a professional sports guard protects the teeth, lips, and also reduces the risks of concussion. Whether your young athlete participates in a contact sport like football, or an individual sport like gymnastics, an athletic guard is the best possible form of dental insurance that you can have. Many injuries come not only from running into another athlete, but coming into contact with pieces of equipment or even themselves.

If your child needs emergency dental care, contact your dentist immediately. Depending on the type of emergency and the current comfort level of your child, you may be instructed to go directly to the office or to wait until the next business day before making an appointment.

Posted on behalf of Randy Muccioli

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