Dental Tips Blog

Oct
8

Should You Get a Crown or a Filling?

Posted in Crowns

You’ve noticed a suspicious dark spot on your tooth and now you’re wondering what you should do about it. If that’s actually a cavity, then it will need some kind of treatment.

Two of the most common methods for repairing tooth decay are fillings and dental crowns. Which will you need?

How Traditional Fillings Work

A filling is a flowable material placed inside a hollowed out space in the tooth. It’s usually light-cured and sets up in a matter of minutes. Fillings are your first line of defense in repairing cavities.

What Makes A Crown Different?

A crown, or cap, is a solid piece of material like porcelain that covers your entire tooth. If a lot of your tooth is damaged from decay, a crown can restore its shape.

Deciding Which Restoration You Need

Which restoration you need depends mainly on how much of your tooth is affected. If the cavity isn’t too deep, a filling is usually enough. But if the decay has reached deeper layers of your tooth or has caused large pieces to chip away, then you’ll need the extra protection of a crown.

What if the damage to your tooth falls somewhere in-between?

Your dentist may recommend a hybrid restoration called an indirect filling (inlay/onlay.) It’s like a filling-crown combo created outside the mouth and then cemented into the tooth like a piece in a puzzle.

It’s impossible to figure out exactly what your tooth needs without having a professional examine it. Call your dentist today to schedule an exam. He or she will help you decide on the restoration that matches your needs.

Posted on behalf of:
Seven Hills Dentistry
1305 Cedarcrest Rd #115
Dallas, GA 30132
(678) 257-7117

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