Dental Tips Blog

Jan
28

Bottled Water and Flouride

Posted in Fillings

You know that eating and drinking too many sugary foods and drinks can cause cavities. You may have wondered if having bottled water is actually better for your teeth, too.

Interestingly, many bottled waters and water purifiers or filters remove fluoride. It has been known for years that drinking water with fluoride helps prevent cavities. Unfortunately, because of the increase in bottle water, many dentists are now seeing an increase in cavities and more patients who need dental fillings and other restorative dental work.

There are a few ways to help combat the lack of fluoride. The first is to purchase bottled water that has fluoride added. Some manufacturer’s make bottled water especially for children that has fluoride added. In some cases, you can add fluoride drops to the water to reach the recommended amount of fluoride daily.  Your dentist can recommend the amount of fluoride drops to use. To check and see if bottled water has fluoride, read the water bottle label.

Bottled water is expensive, though, and if you want to remove impurities and improve taste, you might decide to simply filter your own tap water. If that is the case, the American Dental Association provides a list of water filters that will not remove fluoride. This may be an acceptable option for you and your family.  Water filters are available for pitchers that store in your refrigerator, or to simply place on the tap of the faucet.

Removing sugary drinks from your diet is an important step in keeping your teeth healthy.  Just don’t forget the fluoride while you are drinking!

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