Dental Tips Blog

Feb
13

Do You Have Kidney Disease? You May Still Qualify for a Dental Implant

Posted in Dental Implants

An estimated 11% of adults worldwide are affected by chronic kidney disease, the vast majority of which have oral symptoms that can contribute to tooth loss.

These issues often result from a combination of poor oral hygiene and the effects of medications. Kidney disease can also result from diabetes, another condition that endangers oral health.

What’s more, the negative conditions worsen each other. Kidney disease may affect oral health and poor oral health will prevent you from eating foods that your kidneys need.

Oftentimes, patients with chronic kidney disease are those most in need of reliable tooth replacements. But health risks may have both the dentist and you, the patient, wary. Getting an implant is usually straightforward, but with so many complications in the mix, what can you do?

Implant specialists from around the world have been studying this issue and recently published several recommendations in the International Journal of Oral Science (IJOS):

  • Dentist should consult with kidney specialist to plan implant treatment
  • Multiple blood tests and blood counts are necessary
  • Aim to have surgery one day after hemodialysis
  • Take specialized x-rays of proposed implant site to ensure bone is strong
  • Treat gums for disease before implant procedure to reduce risk of infection
  • Longer than usual healing time
  • Follow up with frequent maintenance visits with dentist

In summary, if you have chronic kidney disease and are interested in getting dental implants, be prepared to take it slow. Careful planning and thorough communication are key.

Talk with your doctor and dentist about the possibility. If the anticipated benefits to your health far outweigh any small risks, getting an implant may well be worth the effort.

Posted on behalf of:
Georgia Denture and Implant Specialists
203 Woodpark Pl #102
Woodstock, GA 30188
(770) 926-0021

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