Dental Tips Blog

Nov
12

Reasons to Take Your Two-Year-Old to the Dentist

Surviving the “Terrible Twos” is something every parent of a toddler understands. Just getting out the door in the morning without a meltdown is considered a success. While there are a lot of things your two-year-old might not like doing, going to the dentist shouldn’t be one of them. Here are a few reasons why dental visits shouldn’t be skipped at such a young age.

To Talk About Any Habits

Thumb sucking, pacifier use, or sippy cups should all be a think of the past. If they’re still an everyday occurrence, it could alter how your child’s adult teeth erupt (or even their speech.) Your dentist can help you stop the habits early, by sharing what techniques work best. 

Screening for Cavities to Prevent Unwanted Infections Later 

Baby teeth can get decay very quickly. At two years of age, your toddler will be getting their “two year molars.” It’s important to have all the teeth examined so that cavities can be treated when they’re very small. Otherwise it can spread very quickly and possibly even result in a trip to the hospital. 

Getting to Experience the Dental Office in a Positive Light 

Some parents wait to bring their child to the dentist until there’s a problem. When that happens, children associate dental care with pain and discomfort. Instead, it’s better to take a preventive approach and help your child keep their teeth healthy before an issue pops up.

Most pediatricians and kids dentists agree that children should see a dentist by their first birthday. Don’t let the Twos catch up with you! Call your family dentist to schedule a visit.

Posted on behalf of:
Three Creek Dentistry
7236 Muncaster Mill Rd.
Derwood MD 20855
240-256-3258

Oct
8

Benefits of Early Dental Care for Kids

Many parents make the mistake of putting off dental treatment until their child has a serious problem in their mouth.

Why does your pediatric dentist want to see your child as soon as possible? Consider a few ways early dental care is good for kids…

Treat Problems While Small

Trying to repair a mouth full of cavities is hard on everyone – the dentist, your child, and you. It’s much easier to just get a simple filling when it’s recommended in the first place. You’ll get a good idea of what your child needs by bringing them in for a dental visit as soon as possible.

Avoid Problems Altogether

Kids’ smiles are clean slates. Keep their teeth strong and healthy, and your children may never have to get a dental crown or tooth extraction. Preventative dental care is easier on young smiles as well as on your wallet.

Track Smile Development

No two kids’ smiles will develop in the same way. There’s no need to panic if you feel your child’s teeth aren’t growing in on schedule. Just plan a trip to the dentist to find out where everything is at.

Set Healthy Habits

Getting your child started on a routine of regular dental visits will help them develop a positive view of the dentist. Your son or daughter can avoid an irrational fear of dentistry and they’ll pick up effective techniques for keeping their own teeth in great shape.

Why put it off any longer? Your family has nothing to lose and so much to gain from getting those first dental visits out of the way!

Posted on behalf of:
Precision Digital Dentistry
674 US-202/206
Suite 7
Bridgewater, NJ 08807
(908) 955-6999

Sep
27

Does Teething Make Babies Sick?

Your baby’s first teeth will usually show up between 4-7 months of age. The teething process continues at a variable rate until your child has all of his or her baby teeth by age 3.

Teething can be a traumatic event. Babies certainly don’t enjoy the sensation and parents are often worried sick over their child’s distress.

Typical signs of teething include:

  • Drooling
  • Chewing on objects, fingers, etc.
  • Crying and irritability
  • Appetite loss
  • Red and swollen gums

But what about fever, diarrhea, and vomiting?

Remember that teething occurs over a large part of your baby’s early years. Age 4 months to three years is pretty much the majority of a toddler’s life. That’s a long time to deal with bouts of tooth pain!

It’s thus easy to attribute any discomfort to teething during this period.

There’s actually no research linking oral pain from teething to other bodily issues such as fever or diarrhea. However, some experts still believe the two are linked.

Your child’s early years are also marked by a rapidly developing immune system. For some time, your baby can easily get sick from a variety of bugs that you’ve already built up immunity to.

So if your child has symptoms like a fever or vomiting, don’t be quick to dismiss them as signs of teething. They could actually be indicating a much more serious problem.

As far as teething issues go, you can alleviate the discomfort by offering icy baby teething rings, cool water, gum massages, or raw vegetables if your toddler can eat them safely.

Talk with your pediatric dentist to find out how you can keep your child comfortable during the teething years. Visit the pediatrician right away if your baby has other unexplained symptoms.

Posted on behalf of:
Center For Restorative, Cosmetic & Implant Dentistry
711 Greenbriar Pkwy, Suite 101
Chesapeake, VA 23320
(757) 547-2770

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