Dental Tips Blog

Sep
29

When Will My Child’s Teeth Fall Out?

Like many other processes in a growing body, teeth fall out on their very own schedule. Kids are often unique in terms of smile development. By understanding a few keystone principles, you’ll know when your son or daughter’s teeth are ready “exfoliate.”

Follow The Leader

Baby teeth tend to fall out in the same order as they one they came in at. For most kids, this usually means that their central bottom front teeth will be the first to get loose. Soon to follow are the upper front teeth, and so on.

When the adult teeth start developing within the bone, they’ll push on the baby tooth roots, triggering them to dissolve. Once the roots are gone, the tooth will loose to make way for the emerging replacement.

Other Factors

Do you have a little girl or boy? That can make a difference. Biologically, females tend to develop a bit faster than males.

If your child naturally loses their first tooth by age 4, that’s not necessarily a cause for concern. Neither is it worrisome if your kid is 8 and hasn’t yet lost any teeth.

What You Should Know

Never force a tooth to come out before it’s ready. Pulling it too soon can result in pain and even an infection. Encourage your child to gently wiggle a loose tooth with their finger or tongue until the tooth is ready to come out. Nature will take its course!

If a baby tooth is lost too soon because of decay or injury or you’re worried about late development, bring your child to your family dentist for an exam.

Posted on behalf of:
Moores Chapel Dentistry
9115 Samlen Lane #105
Charlotte, NC 28214
(704) 389-9299

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