Dental Tips Blog

Aug
3

What to Do When You Fracture a Tooth

Without a doubt, breaking a tooth can be scary and painful. But there’s no need to panic! A few simple precautions can help you minimize the damage and even save your tooth entirely.

  1. Determine How Your Tooth Broke

Teeth sometimes fracture without showing any outward signs of damage. You might know something’s wrong because the tooth will be very temperature sensitive or hurt when you release your bite.

Locate any missing pieces if your tooth suffered an obvious fracture or chip. You don’t want to accidentally swallow any of them, especially if your dentist can bond them back in place.

  1. Rinse

Swishing with warm water to cleanse the area is a good idea. If there is any bleeding, firmly but gently pack some gauze around the tooth. A tea bag is also helpful since it promotes blood clotting.

  1. Ice

Numb the area around your sore tooth by icing your cheek or lip outside your mouth. This can help to bring down swelling. Take a painkiller, if needed.

  1. See Your Dentist or Oral Surgeon ASAP

You will definitely need an x-ray or two to determine the full extent of the damage. If your root is fractured, a tooth extraction may be necessary. Otherwise, your dentist may be able to save it with a dental crown or root canal.

Small damage, like a painless chip, can often be smoothed out with just a bit of bonding.

It’s also possible to bruise the ligaments around your tooth. If this happens, your tooth will hurt for a few days without actually having suffered a fracture.

The only way you’ll know for sure is to see your dentist or oral surgeon as soon as possible!

Posted on behalf of:
Stafford Oral Surgery & Specialists
481 Garrisonville Rd. Suite 103
Stafford, VA 22554
(540) 322-1808

Most Popular

Tori, Exostosis, and Extra Bone Formation in the Mouth

A fairly common occurrence in the mouth is the existence of extra bone development along the outside or inside of the jawline near the teeth, or in the roof of…

Difference Between Conscious and Unconscious Sedation

Sedation dentistry is a wonderful option for many people who would not or cannot tolerate dentistry in a traditional dental setting.   Many people have a fear of visiting the dentist,…

Lingual Frenectomy versus Lingual Frenuloplasty

Lingual frenectomy and lingual frenuloplasty are both dental procedures used to correct a condition called ankyloglossia. Ankylogloassia, more commonly known as ‘tied tongue’, is an abnormality of the lingual frenulum….