Dental Tips Blog

Feb
11

How Do You Know You Need A Root Canal?

Posted in Root Canals

When you returned to work after the New Year, you started noticing pain in your teeth. It’s not all the time, and you want to ignore it, but you know that a small sensation in your mouth can be the beginnings of something big and awful: an abscess.

Before you jump the gun and immediately assume the worst, there are a few other things that could be wrong.

Pain When You Chew: 

Think about it. When you bite down, is the pain on contact with your other teeth, or does it come when you press down to chew or grind your food?  If the pain happens with contact to other teeth, the issue might be related to uneven wear on your biting surfaces. This is a simple fix, and typically takes less than 20 minutes to adjust.

Sensitive Teeth:

Over time, teeth can become sensitive to hot, cold, and sweet. This is particularly true of teeth with older metal fillings. But the sensitivity may not be an indicator of any decay in the tooth itself.  A set of dental x-rays will be able to rule out an abscess.  Toothpaste like Sensodyne or Colgate for Sensitive Teeth can help stop the sensitivity.

What if it IS and Abscess?

Even if your tooth does have the beginnings of an abscess, don’t wait it out.  It will not get better, but will only lead to more challenges later on.  The best thing to do is contact your dentist for an emergency appointment to plan the best course of treatment. With modern methods, root canals are nearly painless and more efficient than ever. You’ll be glad that you called!

Posted on behalf of:
Green Dental of Alexandria
1725 Duke St
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 549-1725

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