Dental Tips Blog

Oct
16

What Does it Feel Like to Get Dental Sedation?

“Sleep through your treatment!”

“You won’t remember a thing!”

“Banish dental phobia forever!”

You’ve heard a lot about sedation dentistry. Although it sounds like an ideal setup, you’re a little concerned about what to expect.

Here’s an idea of what you might experience with dental sedation.

Nitrous oxide: This is a colorless and odorless gas that you inhale through a nosepiece. The gas is a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen.

What you’ll feel: The nasal hood might be pleasantly scented and the air will feel cool, but there’s nothing uncomfortable about the process. Within minutes, your head may buzz, hearing may dim, and your limbs grow numb. You might feel weightless and the sensation could bring on a case of the giggles. You remain conscious the entire time. The effects wear off instantly.

Oral sedative: This comes in a pill or syrup that you take within an hour or so of your procedure. This sedative is only available with a prescription.

What you’ll feel: Although you don’t lose consciousness, you’ll get very sleepy and numb. You will respond to questions and commands during treatment but you won’t remember much afterwards. The medication can last for an hour or so after the procedure.

IV sedation: A needle inserted into a vein provides a steady stream of anesthesia that acts much like the oral version. The effects are also similar to the oral sedative.

What You’ll feel: When you wake up, you’ll feel groggy like you took a heavy nap. It can take a couple of hours for the effects to fully wear off.

Have an open discussion with your dentist well before the procedure so you can select the sedation option that’s safest and most comfortable for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Converse Dentistry
6634 Binz-Engleman Rd #109
Converse, TX 78109
(210) 960-8204

Oct
8

Will My Insurance Cover Dental Sedation?

Sedation as used in dentistry can help patients who:

  • Need lengthy or multiple treatments
  • Have a hard time sitting still in the dental chair
  • Suffer from dental phobia
  • Can’t tolerate needles

You may be thinking about getting sedation to improve your next dental treatment experience. Whether laughing gas, an oral medication, or an IV drip, there’s a method that’s sure to fit your needs. But who is going to foot the bill? 

Dental Sedation Insurance Coverage

Most insurances treat sedation therapy as an unnecessary “extra” in dental care. Veneers, teeth whitening, and dental sedation tend to be lumped together in the luxury category. If you want to try a sedative method, then you’ll likely have to pay for that out of pocket.

Medical insurance may pick up the cost if sedation is absolutely necessary to ensure you get the dental treatment you need. Your dental insurance may also provide some coverage, but the sedation cost will probably be taken out of your regular dental benefits.

Your best bet is to contact your insurer directly to find out what benefits you’re entitled to and even to get a pre-determination.

How To Afford Dental Sedation

You may try a dental savings plan which doesn’t cap your benefits but helps you get a discount on any procedure. Talk with your local dental office about in-office financing and payment plans that can make sedation dentistry a reality. Some types of sedation are more affordable than others!

Don’t let worry over the cost of dental sedation hold you back from giving it a try. Your dental office will help you find the best way to afford any procedure you need.

Posted on behalf of:
Cane Bay Family Dentistry
1724 State Rd #4D
Summerville, SC 29483
(843) 376-4157

Jul
31

Is Laughing Gas Dangerous?

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a colorless gas that depresses the nervous system. It dulls pain and mildly alters awareness. Sounds may be distorted and some people report feeling numb or tingling limbs while inhaling this gas.

This may sound more like a street drug than a medical treatment. In reality, nitrous oxide, better known as “laughing gas,” is an effective and safe anesthetic used by many dentists for mild dental sedation to help relieve anxiety and make dental treatment more comfortable. But, go back nearly two centuries, and you’ll find that N2O was the complete opposite of a medical standard.

Soon after the discovery of this gas, it became a carnival attraction. Whole crowds would assemble to breathe in nitrous oxide and revel in the effects. When a dentist in the 1840s attempted to use nitrous as an anesthetic, he was ridiculed.

Nowadays, we know that recreational use of nitrous oxide can be dangerous. This is primarily because inhaling too much of the gas by itself can deprive your brain of oxygen.

Today’s dentists administer the gas in the safest way possible. The flow is combined with an oxygen tank so that the patients never lose too much air. Only trained dental professionals can give someone nitrous oxide.

On the plus side, nitrous has no residual effects and doesn’t accumulate in the system. Each dose is carefully measured and can be almost instantly reversed, if needed. It’s a very low-stress anesthesia technique that’s popular for children’s appointments.

The FDA regulates the use of nitrous oxide and you can rest assured that the controlled setting of a dental office is a safe place to use it. If you want to ease dental anxiety, ask your dentist whether laughing gas is right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Town Center Dental
1110 State Route 55, Suite 107
Lagrangeville, NY 12540
(845) 486-4572

Jul
25

Why People Without Dental Phobia Are Trying Sedation Dentistry

Have you been seeing more ads for “sleep dentistry?”

It’s becoming a popular selling point for dental offices targeting a population of fearful patients.

While most of us don’t exactly enjoy the prospect of dental work, not everyone has a morbid fear of the dentist. Even so, you might be surprised to see how “sleep dentistry” can make the experience a lot more pleasant for anyone.

What Happens When You “Sleep?”

Actually, you aren’t really sleeping your way through treatment.

Dental sedation isn’t the same thing as general sedation which knocks you out cold. Instead, it relaxes you to a point that you no longer feel anxiety. Even your ability to feel pain is dulled.

The sedative usually comes as a pill or syrup taken before the appointment or an IV medication administered during treatment.

Most people have little memory of their appointment after having sedation. This is in spite of the fact that they were fully conscious, albeit rather woozy. As a result, they “wake up” feeling like they napped through the process.

Thus the “sleep” dentistry!

Why Give Sedation Dentistry A Try?

If you’ve never had trouble with a simple filling so far, why would you bother trying out dental sedation?

Simply, it comes in handy for really long appointments. If you don’t feel like sitting bored for an hour or two for your next root canal, some sedation can make it pass like two minutes. This is also a great way to get multiple projects (remember those three fillings and two crowns you’re due for?) done in one sitting.

Ask your dentist today how a little sedation could improve your next appointment.

Posted on behalf of:
Horizon Dental Care
1615 Williams Dr.
Georgetown, TX 78628
512-864-9911

Jul
18

3 Dental Sedation Myths Debunked

Have you heard the hype about dental sedation? It’s quickly becoming a more popular and accessible procedure than ever before.

Addressing the following three myths can help clear up any confusion about sedation dentistry.

Myth #1: Sedation Can Only Be Used For Complicated Dental Procedures

Facts: Sedation helps you relax during any lengthy, complicated, or nerve-wracking procedure. If getting a small filling is enough to make you break out in a cold sweat, don’t be embarrassed to ask about getting sedation.

The goal of this therapy is to make your treatment easier to sit through – no matter what kind of procedure that is.

Myth #2: Dental Sedation Knocks You Out

Facts: General anesthesia is the kind that puts you out for the count. That’s not the kind that most dental offices are talking about when they suggest sedation therapy.

Dental sedation comes in three methods:

  • Intravenous (IV)
  • Oral medication
  • Nitrous oxide (laughing gas)

Laughing gas is quickly reversible and very light. The other two options can make you feel sleepy and forgetful.

Myth #3: Only People With Dental Phobia Should Have Sedation

Facts: Actually, even if you don’t feel nervous about the dentist at all, you could still benefit from sedation. If you have a strong gag-reflex that could make treatment a little tricky, sedation will dull your response.

Because of neurological problems some people can’t sit still enough for delicate procedures. Here, too, dental sedation comes to the rescue.

Ready to learn other ways dental sedation could improve your next dental procedure?

Contact your local dental office to ask about sedation dentistry options available in your area.

Posted on behalf of:
Columbia Dental Center
915 N Main St #2
Columbia, IL 62236
(618) 281-6161

Jul
17

Why Choose a Sedation Dentist?

Although it may sound like something just for children, phobia-sufferers, or special needs patients, sedation dentistry holds out benefits for everyone.

More dentists these days are offering sedation at their practices to improve the treatment experience.

What Does Dental Sedation Actually Do?

Dental sedation doesn’t make you unconscious. Instead, it just alters your awareness slightly enough so that you can relax. You may nod off on your own, but you won’t be completely put under.

Sedation dentistry aims to keep you comfortable. With the help of some medication, you probably won’t remember much about your procedure once it’s over with.

There are different ways you can be sedated. These include inhaling laughing gas, taking a prescription oral medication, or having a sedative slowly introduced to your body via an IV drip.

5 Basic Benefits Of Sedation Dentistry

  • Reduced sensation helps to dull pain
  • Dozing through your treatment makes it go by faster
  • Sedation makes you feel relaxed and limits the effects of anxiety on your body
  • You can get complicated or multiple procedures finished in one appointment
  • If you have a strong gag-reflex, that will be dulled with sedation

Clearly, just about anyone can benefit from dental sedation. Why not give it a try at your next procedure to see what difference it makes for you?

A Sedation Dentist Near You

Ready to try sedation dentistry?

Talk with your local dentist to find out the options available in your area. Relief from your dental anxiety is just a brief phone call away. After setting up an initial consultation with your dentist, you can freely express your concerns and discuss a sedation option that’s right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Seneca Family Dentistry
2860 Seneca St Suite C
Wichita, KS 67217
(316) 633-4048

Jul
12

5 Ways to Cope with Dental Anxiety

It can be almost impossible to ignore that sense of dread that accompanies you to each dental visit. If your efforts to ignore dental anxiety haven’t been working out, try these suggestions:

  1. Distract Yourself With Music

It’s perfectly fine to bring along a set of earbuds and an audiobook or soothing playlist. Make sure you talk with your dental team about how they can communicate with you during the procedure, if necessary.

  1. Book Your Appointment As Early As Possible

Anxiety levels tend to be lowest when you are well-rested. Your appointment will only be harder on you if you have more time in the day to think about it.

It’s also a good idea to avoid packing too many activities in the same day as your dental visit. That would cause you more stress just by trying to run on time for everything.

  1. Keep Warm!

If you’re chilly, then you’re more likely to feel nervous and uncomfortable. Snuggle up with a warm blanket from home, if that helps you feel better.

  1. Ask About Dental Sedation

There are many options out there for medically alleviating anxiety. In the dental office, these usually include:

– Nitrous oxide (laughing gas)

– Prescription oral sedatives

– I.V.-administered sedation

Once you try sedation dentistry, you’ll wonder what you were so afraid of, to begin with!

  1. Voice Your Concerns To Your Dentist

Your dentist has a lot of experience, but you’ll be able to trust him or her even more after simply vocalizing your questions and concerns.

Make an appointment with your local dentist to find out more ways to kick your dental fears out the door – for now or for good!

Posted on behalf of:
Marvin Village Dentistry
8161 Ardrey Kell Road
Suite 101
Charlotte, NC 28277
(704) 579-5513

Jun
28

Can I Sleep Through My Root Canal?

Posted in Root Canals

If you’ve never had a root canal before, then you might be a little anxious about getting one now.

In years past, root canals were supposedly known as long and painful procedures. How has today’s modern dentistry approach changed the procedure?

You Won’t Feel A Thing

Anesthesia has evolved to include several classes of medications for numbing teeth. Although many people know anesthesia as “Novocaine,” numbing injections also include prilocaine, lidocaine, carbocaine, articaine, mepivacaine, and more.

A couple of long-lasting shots may be all you need.

You really shouldn’t feel a thing. Today’s dentists know that anxiety in the dental chair is not good for the patient. That’s why they work hard to make sure everyone is comfortable while getting the treatment they need.

Dental Sedation During Root Canal Therapy

Despite assurances that you’ll be comfortable during your root canal, you may have a hard time convincing yourself of that fact. Not to worry – dental sedation could help you out here.

With a little medication taken just a couple hours before treatment, you could essentially sleep your way through the process.

Dental sedation lowers your awareness but doesn’t put you completely under. You’ll feel very relaxed and drowsy. It’s possible that you could doze off on your own. Even if you don’t sleep, you will be at ease during treatment and probably won’t remember much afterwards.

Is Dental Sedation Right For You?

Talk with your dentist well before your root canal appointment. Ask him or her about what options are available to you and which would be the most effective.

Call your dentist today for more information.

Posted on behalf of:
The Newport Beach Dentist
1901 Westcliff Drive #6
Newport Beach, CA 92660
(949) 646-2481

Jun
20

Moms-to-Be and Dental Anesthesia Safety

Are you an expectant mom?

While you’re eager to welcome your new baby, you aren’t looking forward to getting dental work. For the sake of you and your baby’s health, however, you might not be able to postpone treatment.

Keep these guidelines in mind for safe and comfortable dental treatment during pregnancy:

When Should Pregnant Women Get Dental Treatment?

It’s best to avoid “invasive” dental treatment during the first trimester. That’s when your baby is going through the most significant changes. Your child’s development can easily be affected by medications during those critical first three months.

The second semester is a good time to get necessary dental work done. It’s safer for your baby and easier on you. All non-essential treatment (like teeth whitening) can wait until after your baby is born.

Anytime you have an oral infection, however, you should not wait to get that treated. The bacteria could harm your baby!

Lower Anxiety

Reducing stress on your body is healthier for you and for your growing baby. You’ll want to reduce anxiety and discomfort during those necessary dental visits.

Category B anesthetic injections are considered safe during pregnancy. This means that you can get numbing shots for dental treatment without any risk to your baby.

Dental sedation medications are not recommended for pregnant women, but your dentist can give you safe alternatives, if needed.

Healthy Smile, Healthy Baby!

A study published in The Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA) last year found that there is no connection between dental treatment with anesthetics and negative pregnancy outcomes.

Despite common misconception, dental treatment is actually beneficial to your developing baby’s health. Schedule a visit to your local dentist for a consultation.

Posted on behalf of:
Mercy Dental
1905 East Monte Cristo Road
Edinburg TX 78542
956-404-0220

Jun
9

Why Give Dental Sedation A Try?

Dental sedation is not as complicated as it may sound.

It’s simply when your dentist gives you either an oral or IV medication to help you relax during your treatment. Your dentist will review your medical history in advance and even consult your doctor to find out which kind of sedation is best for you.

Why should you look into “sleep dentistry?”

Sedation Can Speed Up The Longest Procedures

Some patients don’t have any dental phobias at all. Even so, they would prefer to doze their way through procedures that could take several hours. Sedation dentistry is common for things like:

  • Multiple tooth extractions
  • Root canals
  • Smile makeovers

It’s also not a bad idea to get a lot of little dental procedures done in one sitting. Sedation can help you comfortably sit through all that treatment just so you can get it over with in one day.

Anxiety Is Bad For Your System

If you struggle with anxiety every time you see that dental chair, your body could be suffering more than you realize. Stress floods your system with cortisol, a hormone that can affect blood sugar levels, belly fat, and your immune system.

Give your body a break by relaxing with the help of some sedative medication.

Kick Dental Fear To The Curb – For Good!

All it takes is one bad dental experience to scare you away from the dentist for good.

But one or two surprisingly pleasant appointments could be enough to restore your confidence in dentistry. Try some sedation for one or two procedures and see how much better you’ll feel.

Ask your local dentist about the sedation option that’s right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Cosmetic Dentist of Hayward
27206 Calaroga Ave #216
Hayward, CA 94545
(510) 782-7821

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