Dental Tips Blog

Jan
30

Let Your Dentist Help You Kick CPAP to the Curb!

Posted in Sleep Apnea

If you suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), you understand that snoring is more than just an annoying habit – it’s a sleep wrecker.

“CPAP” is an acronym for “continuous positive airway pressure.” It’s a system used to treat OSA by forcing air into the airways to keep them from collapsing in on themselves.

Unfortunately, about half of all individuals dependent on CPAP find it almost impossible to use. Not only is the machine bulky, but simply wearing it can ruin your sleep as badly as the snoring.

Have you felt similarly about your CPAP machine?

Consider talking with your dentist about your problem. You might be surprised at what you learn.

In fact, some dentist specialize in offering alternative methods for treating sleep apnea. One of these includes “OAT” – oral appliance therapy.

What is OAT?

An oral appliance is a customized device that works by keeping your jaw propped in a position that maintains an open airway at the back of your mouth. Different mouthpieces can either stabilize your jaw or move the position of your tongue.

It’s a little trial-and-error at first to find the one that suits your unique anatomy. Many patients feel it’s worth this effort because they prefer a retainer tray over the CPAP machine, any day.

The best part is that you’ve got 50 different FDA-approved devices to choose from.

Is an Oral Appliance Right for You?

Like CPAP, OAT is not for everyone. Other options include visiting an oral surgeon who can evaluate the cause of your snoring and recommend surgical and non-invasive treatments. Your dentist can give you the best recommendations.

Get started today by calling your dentist for more information.

Posted on behalf of:
Georgia Dental Sleep Disorders
2627 Peachtree Pkwy #440
Suwanee GA 30024

Jan
6

Sleep Apnea Dangers

Posted in Sleep Apnea

Do you snore while you sleep at night?  If so, you may have a condition called Sleep Apnea.

Sleep Apnea is a serious disorder in which breathing is disrupted during sleep. If this condition is left untreated, people with this disorder could stop breathing repeatedly throughout their sleep at night. The brain and the rest of the body may not be getting enough oxygen.  In addition, untreated Sleep Apnea can cause the following conditions:

  • Heart Disease
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Stroke
  • Depression
  • Headaches
  • Snoring

Who is at risk for Sleep Apnea?  People can get this condition at any age.  Some of the risk factors for Sleep Apnea include being over the age of 40, overweight, male, or having a large neck circumference.

Being overweight raises the risk for sleep apnea because fatty deposits in the neck can block the breathing airway at night.  Usually this happens when the soft tissue in the back of the throat collapses while sleeping.  If the overweight individual loses weight, the sleep apnea can often be cured.

Sleep Specialists recommend using a CPAP machine, which is a machine with a mask attached to a hose.  Sleep Apnea patients use this machine at night to help them breathe easier while they are sleeping.  The CPAP machine increases the air pressure in the throat so the airway doesn’t collapse when breathing in.

Once patients have been diagnosed with sleep apnea and have used the CPAP machine, they say they sleep better and feel better.  Unfortunately, there is a lack of awareness among the public about sleep apnea and thus many patients are left undiagnosed and untreated.  It is important to be informed about this serious condition so patients can seek proper treatment.

Posted on behalf of:
Sleep Better North Georgia
2627 Peachtree Pkwy #440
Suwanee GA 30024

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