Dental Tips Blog

Nov
8

Help! My Kid Has Two Rows of Teeth!

“Shark teeth” or double rows of teeth is a very common occurrence in kids. It frequently happens around the lower front teeth in children about six years of age.

As your child’s adult teeth start to grow in, they put pressure on the roots of baby teeth. This makes them start to break down and loosen. With time, the baby tooth gets wiggly and falls out, making room for the adult one to take its place.

Well, that’s how the process is supposed to go. But on occasion, things seem to happen out of order.

Make Way for Adult Teeth

If there isn’t enough room in the mouth for the adult teeth to move into place, they may start to erupt just behind the baby teeth. Or perhaps a baby tooth’s roots were too tough to resorb properly. In either case, an adult tooth may decide to grow in where there’s nothing blocking it.

The problem with this is that now the baby tooth has nothing pushing on it, so it’s not going anywhere. Your child could end up permanently stuck with some double rows of teeth.

Fortunately, your kid’s dentist can do something about this. An examination will help you find out for sure whether tooth extraction is necessary or whether the baby teeth will soon fall out on their own. Get the stubborn primary teeth removed quickly, and there may be time for crooked adult ones to drift into the proper place.

If your dentist advises extracting stubborn baby teeth, everyone can rest assured that it will be a quick and surprisingly comfortable process. Contact your child’s dental office for more information.

Posted on behalf of:
Stafford Oral Surgery & Specialists
481 Garrisonville Rd. Suite 103
Stafford, VA 22554
(540) 322-1808

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