Dental Tips Blog

Feb
16

The Truth About Whitening with Activated Charcoal

Posted in Teeth Whitening

You’ve heard all the hype on social media, DIY videos, and beauty blogs. Activated charcoal is touted for its ability to absorb toxins. It also has abrasive properties for exfoliation.

But how does it do when it comes to whitening teeth?

Please note that the charcoal people are talking about isn’t the kind you use in a backyard BBQ. This has to be the “activated” kind which has improved absorbency.

A lot of those “results” people see after just one brushing with activated charcoal are the same they would get with regular toothpaste. The charcoal just removed some of the surface plaque that naturally dulls teeth. So, don’t let a recently cleaned smile fool you into believing it’s been bleached.

Additionally, some people mistakenly believe charcoal is an alternative to fluoride. As an ingredient in most toothpastes, fluoride is an enamel-strengthener, not a whitener. Charcoal can help clean teeth, but it does not prevent cavities.

Before giving this latest fad a try, you should also think about a few of the drawbacks to using activated charcoal powder:

  • It gets very messy to brush with
  • You risk hurting your lungs if you breathe in the fine powder
  • The roughness can gradually damage enamel

If you’re the DIY enthusiast who just has to give this a try, dentists warn you to think twice. Charcoal isn’t known to actually seep into the tooth layers to bleach them and, if anything, could be harmful to teeth.

For more reliable, immediate and safer teeth whitening, you’re better off consulting your dentist. He or she will give you tips on effective home whitening and suggestions for more ideal methods than activated charcoal.

Posted on behalf of:
Precision Digital Dentistry
674 US-202/206
Suite 7
Bridgewater, NJ 08807
(908) 955-6999

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