Dental Tips Blog

Jan
25

Do Whitening Rinses Actually Work?

Posted in Teeth Whitening

We’d all like a definitive answer on the issue of at-home teeth whitening techniques.

Is rinsing effective? The answer is still both a complicated ‘yes’ and ‘no.’

A liquid whitener won’t necessarily have the effect that the advertising would imply. But with diligent use, it can work in your favor.

How Rinses Can Lighten Tooth Color

Whitening solutions almost universally contain hydrogen peroxide as the active ingredient. Peroxide penetrates pores in the enamel that trap stain from things like food, drinks, and cigarettes. The peroxide releases oxygen which helps to loosen deeply embedded stain.

So these rinses do work, but not exactly in the glittering dynamite way shown on the packaging. It’s simply not as concentrated nor effective as professional teeth whitening treatments. It can even irritate your teeth and gums if not used properly.

What is the right way to use these mouthwashes?

Make Whitening Rinses Safe and Effective

To get the most out of your at-home whitening regimen, you should, ironically, start out by consulting your dentist.

Hydrogen peroxide can make gums very sensitive and irritate teeth that have cavities. Once your dentist gets you caught up with dental treatment, you can whiten your teeth much more easily.

If your dentist agrees that a teeth whitening mouthwash is a suitable option for you, then be patient and diligent. After some weeks of use, you may very well see a slight difference.

A rinse is a great maintenance routine for teeth after having a professional treatment, which is your fastest and safest whitening method.

To find out whether a whitening rinse will help you make your smile dazzlingly white, schedule an appointment with your dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Preston Sherry Dental Associates
6134 Sherry Ln
Dallas, TX 75225
(214) 691-7371

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