Dental Tips Blog

Aug
3

What’s the Difference Between Dental Crowns and Veneers?

Posted in Crowns

Both veneers and crowns replace a portion of your tooth’s outer layer. They can both be placed for cosmetic purposes. They can also both be placed on front teeth…but that’s where the list of similarities ends.

Purpose

The reason you would get a dental veneer may differ from the reason you need a crown. They serve two different purposes.

Crowns are restorative, meaning that they repair and replace lost tooth material. If you have a tooth damaged by decay or a fracture, it will need the help of a crown to stay in one piece.

Veneers are merely cosmetic. You’d put on a veneer or two if you want to enhance the way your smile looks, but they don’t have much value in terms of strengthening a tooth.

Coverage

A veneer is basically a curtain over your tooth. It covers the front of the tooth, but not the entire thing. Crowns, however, replace all of the outer layers enamel and protect whole teeth.

Strength

Crowns are far stronger than dental veneers.

You can crown any tooth in your mouth that needs more support, but veneers only go on front teeth where they won’t experience too much biting pressure. Crowns better suit molars that need the extra reinforcement.

Cost

Because veneers are strictly a cosmetic procedure, it’s very rare for dental insurance plans to cover their cost. You need to be prepared to pay for veneers out of pocket in most cases. Financing options make this fairy easy.

Dental crowns, on the other hand, are often a medically necessary treatment to stop decay and restore tooth structure. This means that they’re usually covered under insurance.

Still not sure whether you need a crown or veneer? Visit your dentist to learn more.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Aug
2

5 Ways to Avoid Getting a Dental Crown

Posted in Crowns

There’s nothing wrong with dental crowns in themselves. If you truly need a cap, then you don’t really have many other options. But they cost more than a filling and take a little more time to place.

The trick to avoiding a crown, then, is to avoid the circumstances that lead you to needing one.

Here are five ways you can do just that.

  1. Protect Your Teeth in Sports.

Contact sports are a major cause of cracked teeth which then need to be capped. Wearing a professional mouth guard during sports can protect your teeth. This is especially important for your kids if you want to avoid dental emergencies.

  1. Avoid Hard Foods.

Teeth experience extensive wear over years of chewing food. Spare your tooth enamel the abuse by avoiding very hard foods like ice cubes, chicken bones, and popcorn kernels.

  1. Prevent Tooth Decay.

Tooth decay is one of the main reasons you could need a crown. If you brush and floss daily and use plenty of fluoride, you can keep cavities at bay and avoid getting a crown.

  1. Relax Your Bruxism Habit.

Do you grind your teeth in your sleep? It may be time to treat the habit so that you don’t crack a tooth with excessive force.

  1. Get That Tooth Filled!

Most problems that lead to getting a crown can be treated easily while they’re small. Get teeth filled when your dentist recommends, and you can keep them strong enough to not need a dental cap.

Would you like to learn some other ways you can avoid getting a dental crown? Interested in some potential treatment alternatives? Contact your local dentist for a consultation.

Posted on behalf of:
Gold Hill Dentistry
2848 Pleasant Road #104
Fort Mill, South Carolina 29708
(803) 566-8055

Aug
1

4 Questions to Ask Your Dentist Before You Get a Dental Crown

Posted in Crowns

Dental crowns transform teeth the instant they go on. They can anchor a bridge, “cap” an implant, restore a tooth’s strength, or even cover up an irregular tooth.

With crowns, you can restore virtually anybody’s smile. But before you get one, you should ask your dentist a few questions to make sure you’re prepared.

Is there a better option for me than a dental crown?”

You might think right now that a crown is the solution for your broken tooth. There are other options, however. Your dentist can explain the alternatives and help you decide which one is right for you.

What are the benefits of getting a crown?”

It’s important to understand why you should cover your tooth rather than leave it alone. Perhaps you were thinking about getting a filling instead of a crown. If you understand the functional benefits of crowning your tooth, you’ll be able to make a better decision for your oral health.

How long will my crown last?”

While you can’t expect a crown to last forever, a well-made one will hold up for a long time. The number of years varies depending on what the cap is made from and what conditions is has to live through (such as grinding habits, injuries, etc.)

How do I care for a crown?”

Your new crown doesn’t guarantee that your tooth is safe forever; it’s still susceptible to decay. You can make your crown last as long as possible by brushing and flossing it well every day. Your dentist may have other instructions tailored to your unique needs.

Does it sound like a crown is right for you? Talk to your dentist for more information.

Posted on behalf of:
Gainesville Dental Group
1026 Thompson Bridge Rd
Gainesville, GA 30501
(770) 297-0401

Aug
1

3 Reasons to Get an Inlay or Onlay

Posted in Crowns

Unlike a dental filling, an inlay is a single restoration designed outside the mouth and placed into a prepared tooth, similar to a crown (only smaller.) If the tooth needing repair has a damaged cusp, then the restoration becomes an onlay, wrapping over part of the tooth.

Why might you need an inlay or onlay?

  1. Enhance the Strength and Beauty of a Patched-up Tooth

If you have a tooth that’s been filled time and again, then it may be weak and discolored. Old fillings pick up stain at the edges and darken with time. Your dentist may be able to place a smooth, continuous, and tooth-colored onlay to give your tooth a facelift.

  1. When a Filling Isn’t Enough

You may need an entire onlay or inlay right from the start to repair a tooth with severe damage. Some fillings or fractures may be too large for a filling. Big fillings are prone to breaking on weak or compromised teeth.

  1. When a Dental Crown Would be too Much

On the other hand, the damage may not merit the full coverage of a dental cap. Onlays and inlays are much more conservative, leaving more of your natural tooth in-tact.

Benefits of Inlays and Onlays

These indirect restorations match teeth in terms of color and flexibility. Onlays and inlays are most commonly made from porcelain or composite resin, helping them blend in seamlessly.

An inlay or onlay is easy to keep clean and maintains a tight seal with your tooth to prevent bacteria from getting in. These restorations are also conservative while retaining strength, making them a great choice for repairing molars.

Contact your dentist for a consultation to learn more about inlays and onlays.

Posted on behalf of:
Mitzi Morris, DMD, PC
1295 Hembree Rd B202
Roswell, GA 30076
(770) 475-6767

Jul
15

Dental Crowns: What Are They and Why Get One?

Posted in Crowns

Dental caps are often placed over teeth with root canals, but that’s not the only reason to get one.

If your car tire gets a small hole in it from driving over a nail, a mechanic can probably patch it up and you can keep using the tire. This is like what your dentist does when you need a filling.

But let’s say that your car’s tire blows out from driving over a larger object. It now needs to be completely replaced. The core structure of the wheel is fine, but you need a new outer component to keep your vehicle in use.

Getting a crown is like getting a brand new tire.

Dental crowns replace most of a tooth’s outer layer. Sometimes, teeth are far too damaged to just patch up with a filling. So the dentist will trim it down to the core structure and cap it off with a strong crown.

The new crown stays on your tooth for good. You use and care for your crowned tooth just like any other.

Crowns are good for teeth because they:

  • Let you hold onto your natural tooth longer
  • Seal out bacteria and debris
  • Strengthen weak teeth
  • Protect a compromised tooth from sensitivity

You could get a dental crown made from ceramic, gold, or a combination of porcelain and other metals. Which kind of crown you get will depend on what your teeth need and how you want your smile to look.

The next time you have a fractured, worn, or decayed tooth in need of restoration, talk with your dentist. He or she may recommend crowning it instead of patching it up time and again with fillings.

Posted on behalf of:
Dream Dentist
1646 W U.S. 50
O’Fallon, IL 62269
(618) 726-2699

May
20

How to Use Temporary Dental Cement to Replace a Crown

Posted in Crowns

Many people have lost dental crowns at inconvenient times. A dentist isn’t always around to make repairs immediately, especially if you’re on a business trip, vacation, or it’s 2am on a Saturday.

Here’s how to properly use the temporary dental cement if you wind up losing a dental restoration.

Check Your Tooth

If your tooth is in excruciating pain or there is some unusual swelling going on, call your dentist for advice. He or she may even recommend an emergency room visit if the office isn’t open.

Once you’re certain you’re okay, make sure your tooth is cleaned of debris. Check the inside of a crown to ensure it’s free of broken tooth pieces. If a lot of your tooth has shattered, just protect the spot (such as with a piece of sugar-free chewing gum) and wait for the dentist to address it. Otherwise, rinse out your mouth with warm water, pick up a dental cement, and get to work!

Cement Safely

In addition to the cement, you will need:

  • Mirror
  • Clean water
  • Towel
  • Floss
  • Toothpick
  • Toothbrush
  • Paperclip

Brush and floss your tooth clean. Use the paperclip to remove excess cement from the crown. Check the fit of the crown without placing any cement. Bite down lightly to make sure everything lines up. If it’s not fitting, try going in at different angles or cleaning the crown again.

Once you’re able to find the right fit, fill the crown with the cement. Place it securely on the tooth, let it set for longer than the instructions say, and use the toothpick and floss to clean up the excess. Brush your teeth afterwards, and you’re all set.

A temporary cement can help you keep on living your life until you’re able to see your dentist the next business day.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Apr
22

Why Are Dental Crowns So Expensive?

Posted in Crowns

Dental “caps” seem so small that most people wonder why they tend to cost three digits or more.

Are crowns really worth it? Why do they cost more than a filling?

A Crown Costs the Dentist, Too

Small though they are, dental crowns require a lot of behind-the-scenes work and support. Your dentist has to pay up front and help fund expenses such as:

  • Crown materials
  • Lab fees
  • Sterilization and other clinical equipment
  • Salaries for office staff
  • Rent/building expenses

Which Kind of Crown?

Varying crown materials and manufacturing techniques affect the price tag. Usually, the cheaper you go, the lower the quality. Crowns made from pure porcelain tend to cost more, but they look and feel the best.

What kind of crown you select doesn’t just depend on your budget, however.

You’ll need to make a decision based upon what’s best for your teeth. A poor choice made in haste because it’s the cheapest could end up costing you far more down the road to fix it.

How to Afford Your Next Dental Crown

With excellent oral care, hopefully you can put off getting a crown for a long time.

But if you end up needing one for your next cavity, you want to be prepared. Your local dental office can help you out here.

Your dentist will explain which restorative options are right for you. Then you can weigh your options in terms of cost versus quality. Whether you have insurance or not, the dental office staff will help you work out a payment plan that suits your circumstances.

Crowns may seem expensive, but a good quality one is a wise investment. Ask your dentist about other ways to afford a vital dental crown to save your smile.

Posted on behalf of:
Crabapple Dental
12670 Crabapple Rd #110
Alpharetta, GA 30004
(678) 319-0123

Mar
31

Does it Hurt to Get Your Tooth Crowned?

Posted in Crowns

Crowns add strength, security, and beauty to a smile by protecting teeth damaged by fracture or decay. Getting a dental crown is a very common procedure, but if you’ve never had it done before, it can be scary to contemplate.

What Happens in a Crown Procedure

The dentist trims away damaged parts of the tooth and shapes it, to leave a strong and solid core. He or she then takes an impression or scan to create a mold of the prepared tooth. This step also captures the layout of the opposite teeth’s chewing surface to make sure top of crown fits naturally in the bite.

None of has to hurt at all! Getting a dental crown feels about the same as getting a filling. Local anesthetic is placed around the tooth being worked on, so it’s perfectly numb. You may feel a little pressure on your tooth as the dentist works, but no pain.

Placing the Crown

Many dentists offer same day crowns.  These crowns are made right in the office while you wait and the entire process can be completed in a singe appointment.  If your dentist does not offer same day crowns, he or she will place a temporary crown to protect your tooth while you wait for your permanent crown to be made. Avoid chewing on your temporary and stay away from very hot or cold beverages.

Your dentist may or may not numb you up at the next appointment to remove the temporary crown. He or she will clean the tooth and tries on the permanent restoration. If it looks and feels good, it’s cemented in place.

You may experience some sensitivity as your tooth gets used to crown. This could take some weeks, but you shouldn’t feel any pain.

Contact your dentist if you have any questions about new or existing dental work.

Posted on behalf of:
Mundo Dentistry
3463 US-21 #101
Fort Mill, SC 29715
(704) 825-2018

Mar
27

Does Your Root Canal Really Need a Crown?

Posted in Crowns

You just put all that time and money into getting a root canal. What’s the point of putting a crown on it? The tooth feels just fine. It doesn’t hurt. You know that the nerve inside is long gone.

Your dentist isn’t arbitrarily suggesting that you get a dental crown. There are actually a couple of very good reasons that you should do so.

  1. Your tooth is now compromised.

Drilling into a tooth to extract the nerve and clean out any debris is a big event for such a little part of your body. Despite being filled with a strong material, your tooth is now very weak and susceptible to breaking under the pressure of your bite.

This might not happen right away. Some people seem to have gone years with an uncapped root canal and not had any problems. But why take that chance?

If your tooth fractures, it will likely be beyond repair. You’ll have to get the whole thing extracted and all the work for that root canal will have been for nothing.

  1. Your tooth will look much better with a crown.

A tooth that has been extensively cleaned out for a root canal won’t look like it used to. Perhaps a lot of decay discolored your tooth before the treatment. Capping it will help it blend in with the rest of your smile.

When You Don’t Need A Crown

Teeth that don’t experience too much bite pressure can get away with a filling alone after a root canal. These sometimes include front teeth and canines. As long as they didn’t lose too much structure during the endodontic treatment, they can possibly get by without a crown. Talk to your dentist to find out for sure.

Posted on behalf of:
Feather Touch Dental Care
1175 Peachtree St. NW Ste 1204
Atlanta, GA 30361
(404) 892-2097

Mar
6

Think Your Dental Crown is Too Big? What You Can Do

Posted in Crowns

Your dentist will always check the fit of a crown before cementing it in place. Take this opportunity to let him or her know whether you feel the cap looks too big.

You’d quickly notice whether a front tooth with a crown looks bigger than the rest.

But it can take a while for you to realize that a back tooth crown feels larger than it should. Once the anesthetic and sensitivity wear off, your crown may become more noticeable.

Why It Happens

Sometimes, it has to do with the way the crown was placed. If the cap isn’t properly positioned on the tooth, it can feel higher than the other teeth. You might sense that the capped tooth is the first one that you bite down on.

Alternatively, the crown itself may have a ridge or peak on the chewing surface that’s too high.

Why It’s Bad

You’ll be able to tell if something doesn’t fit right. In fact, your tongue may get tired from feeling it all day.

But it’s also bad news for your teeth. A poorly-fitted crown can wear down the opposing tooth it bites against. It can also stress the core and root of the tooth it’s covering. An uneven bite can tax your jaw, causing TMJ issues.

What to Do

Go see your dentist for an adjustment. If the crown is really off, then he or she may be able to reposition it.

The most common fix, however, is simply polishing down the high points on the crown. The dentist will use a special drill piece to remove areas that feel too big when you bite down.

Better yet, see a dentist who works closely with their lab and uses careful tools to assess the fit of your crown from the very get go!

Posted on behalf of:
Dental Care Center At Kennestone
129 Marble Mill Rd NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 424-4565

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