Dental Tips Blog

Apr
20

The Pros and Cons of Getting a Denture

Posted in Dentures

Getting a denture is a major life change. You should understand both the advantages and disadvantages to getting a new prosthesis before you dive in.

The Pros of Getting a Denture

Your smile will look great. A will give you the confidence to pose for pictures and laugh like you used to.

Say goodbye to flossing! With no teeth in your mouth, there’s no need to floss.

No more tooth pain. It will be a huge relief to get rid of your teeth if they are few and unhealthy. No more toothaches, no more sensitivity, no more fillings!

Chew with all of your teeth again. If you only have a few remaining teeth, then odds are you haven’t been able to chew very well with them. Eating with a denture does take practice, but it will enable you to enjoy a greater variety of foods than did with no teeth.

The Cons of Getting a Denture

Dentures reduce your bite strength. A denture is no match for what natural teeth are capable of. You may have to cut your food into smaller bites and stay away from hard crunchy items while wearing a denture.

A denture needs daily care. Just because you don’t have teeth to brush and floss doesn’t mean you’re off the hook for oral hygiene. Dentures must be cleaned and soaked daily to prevent stain, bad breath, and infections.

Dentures can wear down your bone. These appliances put weight directly on your bone and cause it to slowly resorb if worn too long (such as sleeping in them.) Your smile will shrink, and your denture will occasionally need to be refitted.

Find out whether a denture is right for you by visiting a local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Muccioli Dental
6300 Hospital Pkwy # 275
Johns Creek, GA 30097
(678) 389-9955

Apr
14

5 Tips for the Best Denture Care

Posted in Dentures

Your new denture is a valuable investment, and one that you depend on every single day. So it only makes sense that you want to take good care of your denture and make it last a long time.

Here are five things you should do to keep your denture clean, strong, and beautiful for many years.

  1. Rinse After Eating

You can prevent a lot of stain, odor, and debris buildup on your denture if you rinse it carefully after each meal or snack. A quick rinse under water is all it takes. Swish some water in your mouth too before putting your denture back in.

  1. Brush Your Denture Thoroughly

Use a soft-bristled brush designed for dentures to clean your appliance. Regular brushing removes food debris and prevents stains from settling into the acrylic. Handle your denture with care while you clean it.

  1. Soak When Not in Use

Did you know that dentures can shrink and warp if they dry out? They’re designed to fit perfectly in a moist environment like your mouth. That’s why you need to soak your denture in a dentist-approved solution during times you’re not wearing it, such as while you sleep.

  1. Clean Your Mouth, Too

Germs on your gums can move right back in to a clean denture. Wipe down your gums every day, even if you don’t have any natural teeth left. Use a rinse to control bacteria growth if your dentist advises it.

  1. Visit Your Dentist Regularly

Regular dental checkups are as important for denture-wearers as they are for those with natural teeth. See your dentist often to make sure your denture is strong, and your mouth is healthy.

Posted on behalf of:
Green Dental of Alexandria
1725 Duke St
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 549-1725

Apr
9

5 Questions to Ask Your Dentist Before Getting a Denture

Posted in Dentures

Getting a denture isn’t the same process for everyone. It’s helpful if you understand your own unique needs and circumstances before getting a set of “false teeth.” Here are five important questions to discuss with your dentist to make sure you understand the recommended treatment.

  1. How will dentures change the way I eat and talk?

Getting dentures is a big commitment since there’s no going back to your natural teeth once they’re gone. It’s crucial that you understand how a prosthesis will change your life before you commit to one.

  1. Should I keep any of my remaining natural teeth?

You may be anxious to get rid of your remaining natural teeth, especially if you keep getting cavities or having other problems. But as long as they’re still strong, you may be better off holding onto them and getting a partial denture.

  1. What kind of denture is right for me?

There are many different kinds of dental prostheses. Your dentist will help you find out which materials and design are right for your smile.

  1. Are there any alternatives to getting a denture?

A denture may not even be the solution you need. Ask your dentist about partial dentures, bridges, implants and other options for restoring your bite.

  1. How can I keep my dentures in good shape?

Getting a denture is only the start of your new responsibility. Keeping your denture in shape and your mouth in good health requires some work on your part. Your dentist will explain what you should do to get the most out of your denture.

Visit a dentist in your area to ask any other questions you have.

Posted on behalf of:
Georgia Denture and Implant Specialists
203 Woodpark Pl #102
Woodstock, GA 30188
(770) 926-0021

Mar
13

How to Get Dentures That Don’t Look “Fake”

Posted in Dentures

The time has come for you to part with most of your remaining natural teeth. Fortunately, you can achieve a natural-looking smile by choosing a denture that looks realistic.

Find a Good Denture Dentist

Search for a dentist or prosthodontist who specializes in dentures. Almost any dentist can make you a denture, but the ones who focus on dentures have the time and experience to craft a realistic-looking set of teeth.

Denture providers take into consideration your facial features, skin tone, and bite physics to design a prosthesis that suits your unique needs.

Invest in a Quality Appliance

When it comes to dentures, you get what you pay for. Cheap dentures will have a rather generic appearance. It costs more to get one that’s tailored to your looks and preferences. If you choose the cheapest option, you may end up with unnaturally large, white, or square teeth on your denture.

It’s worth it to get a set of teeth that look like your natural ones.

Consider an Implant Bridge or Implant-Supported Denture

Have you given any thought to dental implants? Now is a good time to do so before you start planning the extraction of your remaining teeth.

It isn’t practical to replace every single tooth with its own dental implant. But you can get two or four implants in an arch to support a denture appliance.

These implants will help preserve the shape and height of your smile since they add structure to your jaw bone. This is the best way to keep your smile looking natural, while wearing a denture.

Ask a dentist near you about which option is best for replacing your natural teeth.

Posted on behalf of:
Soft Touch Dentistry
1214 Paragon Dr
O’Fallon, IL 62269
(618) 622-5050

Mar
9

Why Even Denture Wearers Need Preventative Dental Care

Posted in Dentures

If you have dentures, then why bother with dental appointments?

The reality is that you still need regular preventative and diagnostic care, even if you have no natural teeth left.

Your Denture Needs Maintenance

Your denture can develop small cracks over time that weaken it and provide a hideout for germs. Eventually, your denture can crack or cause sores on your mouth.

Also, your mouth changes shape as the jawbone shrinks under the pressure of a denture. Your denture won’t fit the way it used to unless you get it adjusted or re-lined by your dentist on a routine basis.

Regular preventative check-ups at the dental office will ensure that your denture stays in good working order for as long as possible.

Your Mouth Needs Checkups

If you don’t keep your mouth clean, you can develop sores and fungal infections. At regular checkups, your dentist will make sure your denture fits comfortably and that your current oral hygiene routine is working well for you. Those exams may also include x-rays and essential oral cancer screenings.

Your Oral Health Affects Your Overall Health

Whether you have teeth or not, your mouth is still an important part of your body. If you have an infection or disease going on in your mouth, then it can weaken your immune system. Bacteria left to grow under a denture can infect other parts of your body if they enter the bloodstream or airway.

If your denture is causing you discomfort, then you may even have trouble eating. A poor diet will result in nutritional deficiencies for your body.

Preventative dental visits will ensure that your mouth is healthy and that your denture fits well. Call a dentist near you today to plan a checkup.

Posted on behalf of:
Precision Digital Dentistry
674 US-202/206
Suite 7
Bridgewater, NJ 08807
(908) 955-6999

Mar
3

How to Make Your Denture More Comfortable

Posted in Dentures

Dentures can sometimes feel bulky, uncomfortable, and far from natural-feeling. A poorly fitting denture can even cause painful sores and chafing.

Here are five ways that you can make your prosthetic teeth as comfortable as possible.

Keep Your Denture Clean

Most importantly, maintain an excellent oral hygiene routine. This includes cleaning your denture daily and properly cleaning your gums, tongue, and any remaining natural teeth. If you let food and bacterial debris build up underneath your denture, you increase your risk for gum irritation.

Use an Adhesive

Less is more when it comes to denture adhesives. Just a tiny bit of denture paste, powder, or cream can give you added confidence that your denture will stay in place.

Soak Your Denture at Night

If you let your denture dry out, the acrylic can warp and shrink slightly, changing its fit. Keep your denture hydrated by storing it in water or a dentist-approved denture soaking solution while you sleep.

Your mouth dries out while you sleep, encouraging bacterial growth, so wearing your dentures at night can lead to fungal infections such as thrush. Soaking your denture at night not only keeps it comfortable, but your mouth healthy.

Practice!

Practice chewing and speaking with your denture from the privacy of your own home. This will build your confidence in your ability to talk and dine with others when you’re in public.

Let Your Dentist Make Adjustments

No denture will fit for a lifetime. As your jawbone changes over time, your denture will require adjustments to stay comfortable. Visit your dentist regularly to check the fit of your denture and see if it needs repairs.

Posted on behalf of:
Greencastle Dental
195 Greencastle Road
Tyrone, GA 30290
(770) 486-5585

Jan
28

How Much Does it Cost to Get and Maintain a Denture?

Posted in Dentures

Just like making any other major purchase, you want to fully understand all the costs associated with dentures before you plan on getting them.

What You Might Pay for a Denture

The tricky part with estimating denture costs is that they vary widely. You could pay anywhere from $300 to nearly $5,000 per upper or lower denture. However, typically the average cost for dentures is somewhere $1,000 – $3,000 per plate (before insurance kicks in.)

Denture costs depend on where the denture is made, what it’s made from, the experience of the dentist, the cost of living in your area, and the technique used to make it.

Immediate dentures, for example, are usually more expensive than traditional ones.

Additionally, you’ll have to ask your dentist what other procedures are included in the quoted price. Does the cost cover just the denture, or does it also include extractions and such that go along with it?

Cost of Maintaining a Denture

Keep in mind that replacing a denture you’ve lost or broken is essentially the same as buying a new one. It worthwhile to keep your current denture in good shape.

A denture reline is a procedure that adjusts your denture to comfortably fit the current shape of your gums and jawbone. You’ll probably need a reline or two within the first few months of getting a denture. After that, your denture may need adjustment every two to five years.

Denture relines can cost around $300 – $400. Add to this the cost of denture cleaning supplies. Soaking solutions, denture brushes, storage cases, and possibly even an adhesive may add up to regular monthly expenses.

Getting a denture is an investment. But it’s not your only option. Talk with your dentist for more information on denture costs and alternatives.

Posted on behalf of:
Mansouri Family Dental Care & Associates
4720 Lower Roswell Rd
Marietta, GA 30068
(770) 973-8222

Jan
27

How to Get Rid of a Fungal Infection Under Your Denture

Posted in Dentures

Everyone has natural yeast or fungus in their mouths called candida. It’s not a contagious thing you can catch from someone else. But if conditions in your mouth are just right, this natural yeast can overgrow and cause irritation.

Denture wearers are especially prone to such infections, since the warm moist environment under a denture is the perfect place for the fungus to thrive.

If you don’t remove and clean your denture on a regular basis, the fungus population can explode and trigger a condition called denture stomatitis. This is inflammation of tissues in the mouth associated with wearing a denture.

Another common term for this yeast infection is thrush.

What should you do if you have thrush and you wear a denture?

Contact Your Dentist

Thrush can be very uncomfortable and can affect the fit of your denture. You may need professional help and prescription meds to get the infection under control. The dentist will give you directions that are specific to your health, oral hygiene condition, and denture type.

Remove and Clean Your Denture

First of all, take out your denture. Your gums need to breathe! The more time you can spend without wearing your denture, the faster the infection can clear up.

Properly disinfect your denture. Scrub it gently but thoroughly with warm water and non-abrasive soap. Soak it in a denture cleaning solution overnight and even after meals. Talk to your dentist about a special solution to use to clear up thrush.

Take an Antifungal

If improved hygiene doesn’t clear the thrush, it may be time for antifungals. Your dentist can prescribe a topical ointment or medication. Apply antibiotic ointment to cracks on the edges of your mouth.

Ask your dentist how you can lower your risk for developing denture stomatitis in the future or clear a current infection up ASAP.

Posted on behalf of:
Grateful Dental
2000 Powers Ferry Rd SE #1
Marietta, GA 30067
(678) 593-2979

Jan
26

Why Your Dentures Don’t Fit Like They Used To

Posted in Dentures

When you first got your dentures, they felt nice and snug and you could chew with confidence.

But now that a few years have gone by, they’re starting to feel a little loose. They slip out of place when you chew and click when you speak.

What’s going on?

Why Dentures Get Loose

Your denture rests directly on your gums for support. When you bite down, the force of your bite presses on the bone underneath. This is different from the way teeth put pressure on bone; teeth have roots embedded deep within the jaw, taking the blunt of the force.

Over time, this constant pressure on your jawbone can actually cause it to start wearing away. As a result, the shape of your mouth changes but your denture doesn’t change to fit it.

Eventually, even the best dentures get loose.

How to Make Your Dentures Fit Again

Your first instinct might be to pack on the denture adhesive. But this solution is only temporary. Adhesive works best in small amounts, anyway, in line with the “less is more” principle.

Never attempt adjusting your denture at home since you could cause irreversible damage.

The best solution for a loose denture is to have it adjusted by a dentist. Only your dentist can successfully reline your denture for a more comfortable fit. If your denture is beyond repairing, then it may be time to get a new one altogether.

If your dentures are loose, then it’s time to see your dentist for advice. Waiting too long will only make things worse, since loose dentures can cause sore gums and wear down your bone even faster.

Call today to find out how you can get a better-fitting appliance.

Posted on behalf of:
Georgia Denture and Implant Specialists
203 Woodpark Pl #102
Woodstock, GA 30188
(770) 926-0021

Jan
8

How Dentures Affect the Shape of Your Smile – for Better and for Worse

Posted in Dentures

Dentures are a common and affordable option for improving your smile’s function and appearance. But what kind of effect they have on your overall facial profile depends on their design and how well they fit.

How Dentures Improve Your Smile

Roots keep your teeth in place. They also stimulate bone health in the jaw. As long as you have teeth in place, the shape of your mouth will stay about the same.

When you lose teeth, your jaw loses valuable support. The bone resorbs and disappears, and your mouth can take on a sunken or caved-in look.

If this has happened to you, then a denture can help restore some of your smile’s original height.

Dentures Can Wear Down Your Jaw

Dentures rest directly on the gums for support. This means that they put pressure on the bone directly and can wear it down over time.

While a denture can keep your smile from looking caved-in, it doesn’t encourage new bone growth. After years of using a denture, your mouth will slowly wear down to the point that you need to be re-fitted.

If your denture doesn’t fit properly, then this bone wear can happen even faster and result in abnormal bone loss.

A bad bite with dentures can lead to problems like:

  • Gum sores
  • Sagging lips
  • Wrinkles around the mouth and neck
  • Saliva and food leaking out of the corners of the mouth
  • Sores and infections
  • Difficulty eating
  • Embarrassment

A well-fitted denture is the key to maintaining a youthful and natural-looking smile. Even better is one that’s supported by implants that act just like tooth roots. Talk with your dentist about denture options to save the shape of your smile.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Smiles Dentistry
2655 Dallas Highway Suite 510
Marietta, GA 30064
(770)422-8776

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