Dental Tips Blog

Aug
4

5 Common Dental Crown Problems

Posted in Crowns

A dental crown usually means salvation for a decayed or broken tooth. But on occasion, some discomfort may persist after the procedure.

Here are five of the most common complications that you could experience.

Tooth Sensitivity

Your tooth will have to be significantly trimmed down to fit a crown. It will understandably be sore and sensitive to temperature changes for the first few days after getting a cap. This can also happen with crowns that are just a tiny bit too short. If even a small amount of the tooth root is exposed then you will feel some increased sensitivity.

Toothache

The trauma of preparing a tooth for a crown can cause some inflammation inside the nerve chamber. This swelling should resolve on its own, as the tooth adjusts to its new shape.

Crown Too High

A tall restoration or too much cement could make your capped tooth higher than it was before. You may not notice the difference right away, but over time, the height change can affect your bite.

Sore Gums Around a Crown

Getting a crown can be a little rough on the surrounding gum tissue. Any irritation should quickly heal within a few days but swelling that persists for weeks could be a sign that there’s excess dental cement left under the gums.

Cracked Root

Crowning a severely cracked tooth can be a gamble. The crack may get deeper over time as you bite down on your crowned tooth and put pressure on it. Once the crack extends into the root, the crown won’t be of much help. An extraction is likely the only way to get relief.

Ask your dentist how the benefits of getting a crown outweigh the risks of side-effects.

Posted on behalf of:
Mansouri Family Dental Care & Associates
4720 Lower Roswell Rd
Marietta, GA 30068
(770) 973-8222

Most Popular

Tori, Exostosis, and Extra Bone Formation in the Mouth

A fairly common occurrence in the mouth is the existence of extra bone development along the outside or inside of the jawline near the teeth, or in the roof of…

Lingual Frenectomy versus Lingual Frenuloplasty

Lingual frenectomy and lingual frenuloplasty are both dental procedures used to correct a condition called ankyloglossia. Ankylogloassia, more commonly known as ‘tied tongue’, is an abnormality of the lingual frenulum….

Difference Between Conscious and Unconscious Sedation

Sedation dentistry is a wonderful option for many people who would not or cannot tolerate dentistry in a traditional dental setting.   Many people have a fear of visiting the dentist,…