Dental Tips Blog

Sep
12

Is Your Crown Too High? Signs to Look For

Posted in Crowns

When you first get a new dental crown, your dentist will check that it fits and isn’t interfering with your bite before it’s cemented in place.

But it’s not unusual to get home and within a couple hours realize that your crown doesn’t feel quite right.

Here are some signs that you should get your crown looked at.

You can’t close your teeth together all the way.

Practice closing your teeth together tightly. Do this without any food in your mouth. If you can’t close all of your teeth together comfortably, then your crown is most likely too high.

You can’t slide your jaw from side to side.

Close your teeth snugly together and shifting your jaw from side to side. If you sense something near your crown is blocking your teeth from sliding together, then your crown may need adjustment.

You feel pain when you bite down.

A high crown doesn’t always hurt, but if it does you’re likely to notice it whenever you’re chewing food.

Pain in jaw muscles.

Your jaw will get into the habit of not letting you bite down on the uncomfortable crown. It won’t take long before your TMJ or cheek muscles start getting sore from being so tense.

Even if your crown is more annoying than painful, that doesn’t mean you can just ignore it. If your crown truly is a little high for your bite, then things will only get worse with time.

You’re looking at fractures, worn enamel, TMJ pain, temperature sensitivity, and even nerve damage.

Don’t wait if your tooth feels a little off! Call your dentist today to schedule a checkup to fine-tune your smile again.

Posted on behalf of:
Mansouri Family Dental Care & Associates
4720 Lower Roswell Rd
Marietta, GA 30068
(770) 973-8222

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