Dental Tips Blog

Aug
21

What to Do When Your Dental Crown Comes Off

Posted in Crowns

If you have a dental cap suddenly come off in your mouth, there’s no need to panic.

A few simple steps will keep your tooth safe and clean until you can see a dentist.

Clean Up

Rinse your mouth out with warm water to get rid of debris. Check your tooth to see if any bits are fractured or broken off. If you aren’t sure, look inside the dental cap for pieces of tooth that may have come off with it. If everything looks fine, use a toothpick to gently nudge loose any cement or food debris.

Secure the Crown

Your cap may still be usable so try not to lose it. Practice fitting the crown back onto your tooth, rotating it until you find the correct orientation. Once you’re sure of the fit, stick the crown in place with a dab of temporary dental cement.

Temporary cement is available in almost any drugstore. It won’t help your crown stay in place forever, but it’s the best way to protect your tooth until you can see your dentist.

In An Emergency

As long as everything is stabilized and you’re comfortable, you can often afford to wait a day or two before seeing a dentist.

But if your crown comes off and leaves a very sensitive, bleeding, or damaged tooth, then you may need more immediate help. Constant bleeding from a tooth injury may require a trip to the emergency room. Call your local dental office for instructions if you are in a lot of pain.

No matter what condition your tooth is in, contact your local dentist as soon as possible to have your crown examined and replaced.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Smiles Dentistry
2655 Dallas Highway Suite 510
Marietta, GA 30064
770.422.8776

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