Dental Tips Blog

Mar
9

Why Did My Dental Crown Fail?

Posted in Crowns

Dental crowns don’t last forever, but you do reasonably expect to get several years out of your new dental restoration.

You’re understandably disappointed whenever a crown fails prematurely. What causes some dental caps to so?

Crown Fabrication Error

It’s not common for crowns to come off after a dentist carefully puts them in place. But if yours pops off soon after placement, you should see your dentist to find out if it was just an issue with the cementing process.

Sometimes, a dental crown can fail because it’s just a little bit too high. Even a subtle height discrepancy (we’re talking fractions of a millimeter) between your crown and your other teeth can cause serious problems. Eventually, your crown can loosen up because of premature wear and fall off or crack.

Recurrent Decay

You play an important role in making your dental crown last. If you can’t keep your crowned tooth clean, then it will fail, just like any other tooth. Your capped tooth is not immune to decay; cavity can still form at the edge and then spread underneath the margins, making it come off. That’s why flossing and brushing capped teeth is so important.

Cracked Dental Crown

Your tooth enamel can handle small cracks. Teeth are even designed to tightly close up small cracks. But dental crowns can’t do that. Once cracked, they’re compromised for good.

A crown can crack from trauma, chewing hard foods, or grinding against the opposing teeth. Once your crown cracks, it’s only a matter of time before bacteria slip inside and eat away the underlying tooth which loosens the restoration.

See a restorative dentist for a check-up if you’re worried about your dental crown.

Posted on behalf of:
Kennesaw Mountain Dental Associates
1815 Old 41 Hwy NW #310
Kennesaw, GA 30152
(770) 927-7751

Most Popular

Tori, Exostosis, and Extra Bone Formation in the Mouth

A fairly common occurrence in the mouth is the existence of extra bone development along the outside or inside of the jawline near the teeth, or in the roof of…

Lingual Frenectomy versus Lingual Frenuloplasty

Lingual frenectomy and lingual frenuloplasty are both dental procedures used to correct a condition called ankyloglossia. Ankylogloassia, more commonly known as ‘tied tongue’, is an abnormality of the lingual frenulum….

Difference Between Conscious and Unconscious Sedation

Sedation dentistry is a wonderful option for many people who would not or cannot tolerate dentistry in a traditional dental setting.   Many people have a fear of visiting the dentist,…