Dental Tips Blog

Oct
17

What to Expect When You Get a Dental Crown

Posted in Crowns

Are you scheduled to get your very first “dental cap”? Here’s what you can expect.

Preparing Your Tooth for a Crown

First off, anesthetic will be used to numb your tooth. The dentist will start trimming your tooth once you can no longer feel anything. This doesn’t hurt; you may just feel a little pressure.

The dentist preps your tooth into a slight cone shape. This allows the crown to fit securely without feeling bulky. Next, he or she will take a scan or mold of your mouth to use as the base for designing the crown.

It takes time to fabricate the crown by hand. So you’ll be fitted out with a temporary cap to protect your tooth while you wait.

Getting Your Permanent Crown

This appointment is fairly quick. You will likely need more anesthetic to keep your tooth comfortable, but everything will go by much faster than the last procedure.

Your dentist will lift off your temporary crown and clean away traces of the cement. He or she then puts in the new crown to check the fit. Once you’re both happy with it, the dentist cements the crown in place with a permanent bonding material.

You may need an x-ray taken of the tooth to ensure there are no gaps or excess cement. Then you’re on your way!

Remember, your new crown is “permanent” in the sense that it’s stronger than the temporary one. But it likely won’t last forever. You need to take good care of it to help it last for several years.

Ask your dentist for more information on getting and maintaining dental crowns.

Posted on behalf of:
Gainesville Dental Group
1026 Thompson Bridge Rd
Gainesville, GA 30501
(770) 297-0401

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