Dental Tips Blog

Jan
4

What Happens When You Get a Dental Crown

Posted in Crowns

The famous gold teeth of dental lore are the forerunners to today’s sleek and comfortable dental caps. While dental crowns can still be made out of gold, most patients seek out restorations made from more life-like materials like porcelain.

But you’ve probably wondered more than once: how is a crown placed?

First of all, you visit your dentist to find out if a crown is even the best option for your tooth. He or she will help you decide on a material that best suits the needs of your smile.

Appointment #1

To get started, the tooth is numbed with anesthetic and reshaped so it will fit under a “cap.” Next, a series of impressions is taken to make a mold for the crown and to get an idea of how your teeth fit together when you bite. This ensures your restoration feels natural when you chew on it. Afterwards, your dentist will place a temporary crown to protect the exposed tooth.

The whole first appointment usually takes less than an hour. Within two weeks, the dental lab will have finished up your final crown and your dentist will call you in to have it placed.

Appointment #2

This appointment should be even shorter than the first. Your dentist will lift off the temporary crown, check the fit of the new one, and then cement it in place. Once it’s bonded, the fit will be checked and adjusted again.

You’ll leave with some instructions for special care in the early days of getting a crown. Make sure to ask your dentist for suggestions on making your crown last as long as possible.

Posted on behalf of:
River Ranch Dental
203 George Hopper Rd #100
Midlothian, TX 76065
(469) 672-4245

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